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Does Russian/Slavic Tribe Of Molokans Still Live In Armenia?

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  • Does Russian/Slavic Tribe Of Molokans Still Live In Armenia?

    Hello, everyone!

    I think a small number of them still live in Fioletovo, Armenia. But how many?
    Does anyone know? Did anyone of the forum members ever meet the Molokans before?

    The very subject of the history of the Molokans is pretty interesting, so I hope there will be an interesting discussion here.

    NP
    From Victory to Victory!

  • #2
    Re: Does Russian/Slavic Tribe Of Molokans Still Live In Armenia?

    From Onnik Krikorian:

    Fioletova, Armenia
    Hi,

    I don't have any news or info to add about Molokans in Armenia but I've just returned from Fioletovo and although didn't get many photos taken because of the weather but also, because most of the villagers did not want their photos taken, I thought I'd send them on. You're free to use them for educational and not-for-profit purposes.

    ....

    Cheers,
    Onnik Krikorian

    http://molokane.org/places/FSU/Armen...ian/index.html



    The Molokans (Russian: Молока́не) are a "Biblically-centered" religious movement, among Russian peasants (serfs), who broke away from the Russian Orthodox Church in the 1550s. Molokans denied the Czar's divine right to rule and rejected icons. They also reject the Trinity as outlined by the Nicene Creed, the Orthodox fasts, military service, the eating of unclean foods, and other practices, including water baptism.

    The name "Molokan" was used for the first time in the 1670s, in reference to the people who ignored the 200 fasting days, drinking milk (moloko = "milk" in Russian). Molokans themselves did not completely reject the name—even adding words like "drinking of the spiritual milk of God" (according to I Peter 2:2, "Like newborn babies, crave pure spiritual milk, so that by it you may grow up in your salvation").

    Heretics were punished in Czarist Russia. Beatings, torture, kidnapping, imprisonment, banishment, dismembering, killing, and other forms of punishment were inflicted upon those called "Spiritual Molokans". In the 1800s, the government's policy was to send the heretics away from the center of the country into Caucasus, especially Armenia, Azerbaijan, Ukraine, central Asia, and Siberia. In 1833, there was a reported outpouring of the Holy Spirit upon a number of Molokans in the Transcaucasus region.

    At the end of the 19th century, there were about 500,000 Molokans within the Russia empire. Before World War I there was a well-known colony of Molokans that had been exiled to the Caucasus (an area long within Russian hegemony), mainly to what is now Armenia, Azerbaijan, and eastern Turkey (Kars plain).

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Molokans


    Pictures from History of Caucasian Molokans and Dukhobors
    by Ivan Iakov. Semyenov, Erevan 2001





    Fioletovo, Armenia



    Home of Maksim Gavrilovich Rudometkin in the village of Fioletovo.




    Molokans in the village of Fioletovo, Armenia



    Graves of the ancestors (village of Fioletovo) [Called domiki, little houses, these have hinged covers to protecct the inscription.]



    Village street



    Future homemakers.

    http://molokane.org/molokan/Location..._Pictures.html

    http://molokane.org


    Expelled from the homeland

    [October 20, 2004]

    "We didn't accept their dirty customs, the commandments of their Church. And so they expelled us," 95-year-old Ivan Nikolayevich tells us the story of the Molokans. The residents of the village of Fioletovo in the Lori Marz hold the customs of their ancestors sacred and follow their religious teachings. Because of these teachings, a number of families from the Tambov region of Russia were expelled by Czarina Catherine the Second more than two centuries ago. God guided them towards the Biblical Mount Ararat. The northern region of Armenia appealed to them; they settled here and established a seven-family community. They built houses, began to work the land, and took root themselves in the foreign land. A commander named Nikitin who was serving in a nearby military unit gave considerable help to the Russians who had been expelled from their homeland. In return, they immortalized him by naming their settlement Nikitin. During the Soviet era, the village was renamed in honor of a revolutionary, Fioletov.

    http://archive.hetq.am/eng/society/0410-ml.html






    http://molokane.org
    Last edited by North Pole; 06-12-2008, 05:30 PM.
    From Victory to Victory!

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Does Russian/Slavic Tribe Of Molokans Still Live In Armenia?

      Originally posted by North Pole View Post
      Does anyone know? Did anyone of the forum members ever meet the Molokans before?
      I had the pleasure of meeting a few Molokans several years ago in Yerevan. They were working as construction laborers near the Yerevan Opera house. I noticed them because of their none-Armenian "look," they were tall, blond with pinkish/redish skin. I approached their foremen asking who and/or what they were and he said they were Molokans. I got to exchange a couple of words with them in Armenian, but that was about it. They seemed very reserved and serious. I felt as if I was disturbing their solitude. After they went about their work assignment their foremen told me that in Yerevan construction contractors like hiring Molokans because they are known to be very hardworking and very honest.
      Մեր ժողովուրդն արանց հայրենասիրութեան այն է, ինչ որ մի մարմին' առանց հոգու:

      Նժդեհ


      Please visit me at my Heralding the Rise of Russia blog: http://theriseofrussia.blogspot.com/

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Does Russian/Slavic Tribe Of Molokans Still Live In Armenia?

        Originally posted by Armenian View Post
        I had the pleasure of meeting a few Molokans several years ago in Yerevan. They were working as construction laborers near the Yerevan Opera house. I noticed them because of their none-Armenian "look," they were tall, blond with pinkish/redish skin. I approached their foremen asking who and/or what they were and he said they were Molokans. I got to exchange a couple of words with them in Armenian, but that was about it. They seemed very reserved and serious. I felt as if I was disturbing their solitude. After they went about their work assignment their foremen told me that in Yerevan construction contractors like hiring Molokans because they are known to be very hardworking and very honest.

        I suprised the guy knew Armenian, many (at least in the older generation) don't learn Armenian as they don't venture too far and majority of Armenians understand and/or speak Russian. They're like the amish of Armenia.

        My cousin served in the army about 7 years ago and in his platoon was a Molokan Russian guy, anyways they are still pretty good friends I met him two years ago, he is nice guy, other than that I've never been to their villages.
        For the first time in more than 600 years, Armenia is free and independent, and we are therefore obligated
        to place our national interests ahead of our personal gains or aspirations.



        http://www.armenianhighland.com/main.html

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Does Russian/Slavic Tribe Of Molokans Still Live In Armenia?

          Originally posted by Armanen View Post
          I suprised the guy knew Armenian, many (at least in the older generation) don't learn Armenian as they don't venture too far and majority of Armenians understand and/or speak Russian. They're like the amish of Armenia.
          I think there was four or five of them. They were young/middle age. And they did seem to speak some heavily accented Armenian, very basic Armenian. I only got to exchange a few words with them. They looked serious and did not seem to be very talkative.
          Մեր ժողովուրդն արանց հայրենասիրութեան այն է, ինչ որ մի մարմին' առանց հոգու:

          Նժդեհ


          Please visit me at my Heralding the Rise of Russia blog: http://theriseofrussia.blogspot.com/

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Does Russian/Slavic Tribe Of Molokans Still Live In Armenia?

            Originally posted by Armenian View Post
            I approached their foremen asking who and/or what they were and he said they were Molokans. I got to exchange a couple of words with them in Armenian, but that was about it. They seemed very reserved and serious. I felt as if I was disturbing their solitude.
            They are:

            These refugees are totally unlike other refugees. The do not complain. They speak of the shootings and their anxieties when asked, but do not blame or curse anyone. I never heard them repeat that traditional refrain that Russia has deserted them. They are most grateful for any help give. That Russia or Armenia owes them anything is not part of their mentality.

            http://molokane.org/places/FSU/Armen...New_Times.html


            Originally posted by Armanen View Post
            They're like the amish of Armenia.
            True. But they drive cars....

            http://molokane.org/places/FSU/Armen...ian/index.html
            From Victory to Victory!

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