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Global Warming

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  • Haykakan
    started a topic Global Warming

    Global Warming

    I think by now it is clear that global warming is having a huge impact on our world. The superstorm raging across the eastern seaboard now is one of the many unprecedentet weather events which have never before been recorded nor witnessed previosly. I have felt the effects of global warming perhaps more then most people because i am a avid icefisherman and i have witnesses the disappearence of safe ice in michigan. We used to have about three months of safe ice here and that has not happened in over a decade with only 2 weeks of safe ice last year(also unprecedented). What pisses me off is that global warming was never even mentioned in any of the presidential debates by either candidate nor the media people, instead what we heard over and over again was more oil, gas, and coal.. There seems to be no limits as to the dept ones head can reach inside ones a-hole. This isuue has been swept under the rug at our own peril and i just wanted to bring it back out for discussion so that the subject can be revived.

  • Haykakan
    replied
    Re: Global Warming

    BOISE, Idaho — More than a quarter million sockeye salmon returning from the ocean to spawn are either dead or dying in the Columbia River and its tributaries due to warming water temperatures.

    Federal and state fisheries biologists say the warm water is lethal for the cold-water species and is wiping out at least half of this year's return of 500,000 fish.

    "We had a really big migration of sockeye," said Ritchie Graves of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. "The thing that really hurts is we're going to lose a majority of those fish."

    He said up to 80 percent of the population could ultimately perish.

    Elsewhere in the region, state fisheries biologists in Oregon say more than 100 spring chinook died earlier this month in the Middle Fork of the John Day River when water temperatures hit the mid-70s. Oregon and Washington state have both enacted sport fishing closures due to warm water, and sturgeon fishing in the Columbia River upstream of Bonneville Dam has been halted after some of the large, bottom dwelling fish started turning up dead.

    Efforts by management teams to cool flows below 70 degrees by releasing cold water from selected reservoirs are continuing in an attempt to prevent similar fish kills among chinook salmon and steelhead, which migrate later in the summer from the Pacific Ocean.

    The fish become stressed at temperatures above 68 degrees and stop migrating at 74 degrees. Much of the basin is at or over 70 degrees due to a combination that experts attribute to drought and record heat in June.

    "The tributaries are running hot," Graves said. "A lot of those are in the 76-degree range."

    In Idaho, an emergency declaration earlier this month allowed state fisheries managers to capture endangered Snake River sockeye destined for central Idaho and take them to a hatchery to recover in cooler water. Of the 4,000 fish that passed Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River, less than a fourth made it to Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River. An average year is 70 percent.

    "Right now it's grim for adult sockeye," said Russ Kiefer of the Idaho Department of Fish and Game. He said sockeye will often pull into tributary rivers in search of cooler water, but aren't finding much relief.

    "They're running out of energy reserves, and we're getting a lot of reports of fish dead and dying," he said.

    Thirteen species of salmon and steelhead are listed as endangered or threatened in the Columbia River basin.

    Don Campton of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said fish congregating in confined areas trying to find cool water makes them a target for pathogens.

    "When temperatures get warm, it does stress the fish out and they become susceptible to disease," he said.

    Graves said that this year's flow in the Columbia River is among the lowest in the last 60 years. But he said the system has experienced similar low flows without the lethal water temperatures. He said the difference this year has been prolonged hot temperatures, sometimes more than 100 degrees, in the interior part of the basin.

    "The flow is abnormally low, but on top of that we've had superhot temperatures for a really long time," he said.

    Leave a comment:


  • Haykakan
    replied
    Re: Global Warming

    WASHINGTON — Earth dialed the heat up in June, smashing warm temperature records for both the month and the first half of the year.

    Off-the-charts heat is "getting to be a monthly thing," said Jessica Blunden, a climate scientist for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. "This is the third month this year that we've broken the monthly record."

    "There is almost no way that 2015 isn't going to be the warmest on record," she added.

    NOAA calculated that the world's average temperature in June hit 61.48 degrees Fahrenheit (16.33 Celsius), breaking the old record set last year by 0.22 degrees (.12 degrees Celsius). Usually temperature records are broken by one or two one-hundredths of a degree, not nearly a quarter of a degree, Blunden said.

    And the picture is even more dramatic when the entire year is considered.



    FILE - In this June 29, 2015, file photo, children play as they cool down in a fountain beside the Manzanares river in Madrid, Spain. June was warm nearly all over, with exceptional heat in Spain, Austria, parts of Asia, Australia and South America. Pakistan reported a June heat wave that killed more than 1,200 people, which according to an international database would be the 8th deadliest in the world since 1900. AP Photo/Andres Kudacki, File FILE - In this June 29, 2015, file photo, children play as they cool down in a fountain beside the Manzanares river in Madrid, Spain. June was warm nearly all over, with exceptional heat in Spain, Austria, parts of Asia…The first six months of 2015 were one-sixth of a degree warmer than the old record, set in 2010, averaging 57.83 degrees (14.35 Celsius).

    The old record for the first half of the year was set in 2010, the last time there was an El Nino — a warming of the central Pacific Ocean that changes weather worldwide. But in 2010, the El Nino petered out. This year, forecasters are predicting this El Nino will get stronger, not weaker.

    "If that happens, it's just going to go off the charts," Blunden said.

    June was warm nearly all over the world, with exceptional heat in Spain, Austria, parts of Asia, Australia and South America. Southern Pakistan had a June heat wave that killed more than 1,200 people — which according to an international database would be the eighth deadliest in the world since 1900. In May, a heat wave in India claimed more than 2,000 lives and ranked as the fifth deadliest on record.

    May and March also broke monthly heat records, which go back 136 years. Earth has broken monthly heat records 24 times since the year 2000, but hasn't broken a monthly cold record since 1916.

    "This is what anthropogenic global warming looks like, just hotter and hotter," said Jonathan Overpeck, co-director of the Institute of the Environment at the University of Arizona.

    Leave a comment:


  • Artashes
    replied
    Re: Global Warming

    Headline on one of the local newspapers this morning -- 10/1/14
    35,000 walrus come to shore at point lay because floating sea ice is weak and sporadic and not sufficient to support them.
    Although this has happened before since the climatic change started rearing its ugly head, it is not normal for the walrus to do this. They usually are out on the ice.
    Thirty five thousand stranded and vulnerable.
    Bad news. Just one of the consequences of man trashing the planet.

    Leave a comment:


  • Artashes
    replied
    Re: Global Warming

    Originally posted by Eddo211 View Post
    all large jets have the capability to dump fuel in flight to lower the aircraft's weight down to landing weight.....this is normally done during an emergency to return to land and regulations calls for dumping over the sea and not ground. The fuel jettison tubes are close to the wing tip area.
    Also normal contrails can change color as the sun sets or moves across the horizon.

    With that said the US is experimenting with cloud seeding to create rain clouds or to stop the rain clouds by introducing charge particles into the atmosphere. Some speculate its future military application by creating severe weather like tornadoes, hurricane, and tsunami. You have some facts and some conspiracy theories to go with it.
    I have many pictures of the actions I spoke of from all over the world.
    The planes up here as well as across the globe are flying to nowhere. They are flying in patterns and criss crossing the previous path. All commercial planes have a flight path that is generally followed strictly.
    The world citizenry is just now starting to collect rain samples as well as dirt samples and low lying natural collection (trees/shrubs, etc).
    Aluminum oxides, barium salts, and other matter have been identified so far.
    When the govt programs that are detrimental to the common wheel are exposed, the first thing they do is lie and tell us it is benificial to us or national security. Often there is a grain of truth to their lies but the primary purpose is always obfuscated.
    This program is of such size and cost as to be stunning.
    It's live and in color and happening now.
    ---- RIGHT NOW ----
    It's taking place right in front of our eyes. Our general response... Apathy.
    Those in control have the general populations number.
    Let me quote (I paraphrase)....... Why are we worrying about an event that took place way back a hundred years ago when we have such pressing problems today
    We're fkd.

    Leave a comment:


  • Eddo211
    replied
    Re: Global Warming

    Originally posted by Artashes View Post
    When the skies up here in north Alaska become 40% or more clear, then you see the military jets (large) fly from eilson air force base and criss cross the skies. They release some particulate gaseous matter that looks like a condensation trail but it is not. The trail does not dissipate like a con-trail but lingers and changes the color of the sky and the cloud formations are disfigured and changed.
    If one examines the plane close, one can see nozzles that are releasing this matter from the trailing edge of the wings.
    I have got no answers from the air force or community ?leaders?. The general public is a blank and continues to be concerned about their emmediate lives to the exclusion of all else.
    The size of the aircraft being used to disburse these chemicals into the atmosphere indicates --- TONS --- of this stuff are being introduced into the skies up here.
    This is not the only place this is occurring.
    How many tons and to what purpose?
    ---- can you feel the love? ----
    all large jets have the capability to dump fuel in flight to lower the aircraft's weight down to landing weight.....this is normally done during an emergency to return to land and regulations calls for dumping over the sea and not ground. The fuel jettison tubes are close to the wing tip area.
    Also normal contrails can change color as the sun sets or moves across the horizon.

    With that said the US is experimenting with cloud seeding to create rain clouds or to stop the rain clouds by introducing charge particles into the atmosphere. Some speculate its future military application by creating severe weather like tornadoes, hurricane, and tsunami. You have some facts and some conspiracy theories to go with it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Artashes
    replied
    Re: Global Warming

    When the skies up here in north Alaska become 40% or more clear, then you see the military jets (large) fly from eilson air force base and criss cross the skies. They release some particulate gaseous matter that looks like a condensation trail but it is not. The trail does not dissipate like a con-trail but lingers and changes the color of the sky and the cloud formations are disfigured and changed.
    If one examines the plane close, one can see nozzles that are releasing this matter from the trailing edge of the wings.
    I have got no answers from the air force or community ?leaders?. The general public is a blank and continues to be concerned about their emmediate lives to the exclusion of all else.
    The size of the aircraft being used to disburse these chemicals into the atmosphere indicates --- TONS --- of this stuff are being introduced into the skies up here.
    This is not the only place this is occurring.
    How many tons and to what purpose?
    ---- can you feel the love? ----

    Leave a comment:


  • Artashes
    replied
    Re: Global Warming

    This June in Fairbanks Alaska a hundred year record was broken for rainfall, and July fell short of breaking it's record by about an inch or less.
    The army corp of engineers had to open a flood gate at the flood control plain to prevent the Chena river from jumping its banks and flooding Fairbanks.
    This last winter in a town where 10 below zero was the high temperature for January & February , 2/3 of January were above zero & 50% of February were above zero and often double degits above.
    Getting strange up here and has been for past 14 years

    Leave a comment:


  • Haykakan
    replied
    Re: Global Warming

    JESSICA DESVARIEUX, TRNN PRODUCER: Welcome to The Real News Network. I'm Jessica Desvarieux in Baltimore.
    May and June had the hottest global temperatures on record, according to a report from the National Climactic Data Center. With July coming in as the Earth's fourth-hottest month on record, glacier-covered Greenland is seeing a real impact, and it has climate change scientists concerned.
    Our guest, Peter Sinclair, has been documenting this impact. He is the media director of the Dark Snow Project, an international team of researchers and climate communicators. He recently returned from his trip to Greenland, and he's currently in Midland, Michigan.
    Thanks for being with us, Peter.
    PETER SINCLAIR, VIDEOGRAPHER, DARK SNOW PROJECT: I'm very happy to be here. Thank you.
    DESVARIEUX: So, Peter, let's take a look at some of the visuals that you captured there in Greenland. I mean, you look at it, and it looks so pristine and peaceful, but people are really concerned about what's going on there. Why is Greenland of particular interest to climate change scientists?
    SINCLAIR: Greenland is currently the ice sheet that is giving us the greatest contribution to sea level rise. We saw BBC report this morning that the combined ice sheets--Antarctica and Greenland--have doubled their mass loss in the last five years. This is very sobering news. And now Antarctica is ten times the size of Greenland and will overtake Greenland at some time in this century as the main source of sea level rise. But for now, Greenland, with potentially 22 feet of sea level rise locked up in the ice there, is a major area of concern. And there may be things that we can still do to save Greenland, or to at least slow down its loss. So it's a major focus at this time.
    DESVARIEUX: So the ice sheet is a major focus, as you just said. But can you break down some of the data that you gathered while there on your recent trip? How does it compare to data from previous studies?
    SINCLAIR: Well, what Dark Snow Project is looking at is factors that are darkening the ice. Our science director, Jason Box, has documented that the Greenland ice sheet is darkening. Therefore it is absorbing more solar energy during summertime. And more solar energy makes the surface melt faster.
    There are reasons for the ice sheet to get dark. Some of them are natural. Some of them are produced by simply increasing areas of the ice sheet that are melting during the summer. As we get warmer and warmer temperatures that come further into the ice sheet, we see those areas remain above freezing long enough to get significant melt.
    So we were in that melt zone, about 20 kilometers in on the ice sheet, that is gradually expanding, where you see water everywhere moving into streams. You can see in the video the streams get larger and larger. And we had, not far away from our camp, we had what are called moulins, these waterfalls where the surface water plunges into the heart of the ice sheet, and thereby sending a whole lot of warmth down into--deep, deep into the ice.
    And so, as I said, we know this has always happened around the edges, but those edges are getting wider and wider and wider. And so it's critical that we understand why. Part of the reason may be soot from wildfires, which are increasing in northern forests around the hemisphere. Part of it may be from biological activity of algae and microbes that are able to grow and to develop when they have liquid water, when they're not frozen. And these microbes create a darkening effect on the ice sheet. And you can see in some of the video some of the areas that are sort of a dark grayish color. Those are the algae areas that we're looking at.
    DESVARIEUX: But, Peter, I mean, you're over there in Michigan, I'm sitting here in this lovely studio in Baltimore, but we're talking about Greenland. Why should people even be concerned about what's going on there?
    SINCLAIR: Well, I've heard scientists say what happens in the Arctic does not stay in the Arctic. We're looking at signs of sea level rise that are becoming increasingly difficult to ignore, particularly in places like Miami, also other places around the world where people are crowded together along low-lying coasts. Hurricane Sandy was certainly a wake-up call, in that it showed us that it doesn't take too many inches of sea level rise to begin to overwhelm infrastructure that we've built long our coasts, infrastructure that was built for the sea level of maybe 50 or 100 years ago but is rapidly becoming overwhelmed when we have an extreme event like a hurricane or extreme storm. So Greenland is going to--the melt of Greenland and the other ice sheets is going to come around and bite us a lot sooner than some people think.
    DESVARIEUX: Which populations would then be bitten harder, I guess, in terms of which populations would be most affected by this sea level rise?
    SINCLAIR: Well, of course, anyone--you said--I believe you're in Baltimore. Is that correct?
    DESVARIEUX: That's correct.
    SINCLAIR: Yeah. So I've been to the harbor in Baltimore, and I don't think it takes a lot of imagination to imagine, picture a foot or two or three of sea level rise, which at the current rates, at the current rate of increase, we could very well see in our lifetime, and what that might do the case of a storm, for instance.
    DESVARIEUX: Okay. So, Peter, I have a challenge for you. How would you respond to those climate-change skeptics that say the Earth has gone through drastic climate change before and that there is no link to human activities such as the burning of fossil fuels and emissions of greenhouse gases? How can we make that direct correlation?
    SINCLAIR: Well, the scientists, it's because the scientists understand the changes of the past so well that they're concerned about the changes we're making now. Generally, in the past the planet has changed. It's changed due to changes in orbital cycles, changes in the sun, sometimes changes in volcanic activity. None of those changes adequately explain the warming process that we're seeing that is undeniable at the present time. But there's plenty of evidence of, in the past, that when we have greenhouse gases, particularly carbon dioxide, when they have, through natural processes, gone up, then we get a warmer planet.
    And so what we've done now and what I've outlined in the interviews with scientists in some of my videos is that we've created an atmosphere now that is like the atmosphere we had two and a half million years ago. And when we look at sea level two and a half million years ago, we see that it was 50, 60, or even 70 feet higher than it is today.
    That won't happen all at once. It won't happen right away. But the past is definitely a record that is warning us that if we keep on the same trajectory, if we keep the same atmosphere that we have already today, that we're heading for much higher sea level rise that most people appreciate.
    DESVARIEUX: Alright. Peter St. Clair, very interesting analysis. Thank you so much for being with us.
    SINCLAIR: You bet. Thank you.

    Leave a comment:


  • Artashes
    replied
    Re: Global Warming

    In post #46 I said Fairbanks university said the ice cap has been same basic size and form for 10,000 years.
    Meant to say 50,000 years.

    Leave a comment:

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