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    Thread: Armenia's Energy sector

    1. #31
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      Re: Armenia's Energy sector

      Quote Originally Posted by Vrej1915 View Post
      Just a little description of our Gas network, to make the debate clearer............
      Vrej

      Thank you for very informative explanation of events relating to issues in the energy sector.
      I used to follow the news in those days but never managed to join the dots.
      Very strategic for the country and matter of life and death during those years.

      You seem very informed therefore I have to ask, why do you rely so much on that crap paper lrakir?


      .
      Politics is not about the pursuit of morality nor what's right or wrong
      Its about self interest at personal and national level often at odds with the above.
      Great politicians pursue the National interest and small politicians personal interests

    2. #32
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      Re: Armenia's Energy sector

      Quote Originally Posted by londontsi View Post
      Vrej

      Thank you for very informative explanation of events relating to issues in the energy sector.
      I used to follow the news in those days but never managed to join the dots.
      Very strategic for the country and matter of life and death during those years.

      You seem very informed therefore I have to ask, why do you rely so much on that crap paper lrakir?


      .
      Once again, "I do not rely on", I use articles published in.
      If you consider that you have a better choice, please do propose in this:
      http://forum.hyeclub.com/showthread....llowed-to-read

      Why: because I do not find same subjects elsewhere.

      Do you consider my quoted articles as crap?: please have a sit, and show which argument posted by me is crap, I would be happy to read your view.

    3. #33
      Registered User Serjik's Avatar
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      Re: Armenia's Energy sector

      Did it ever occur to anyone that this Vrej charakter is not who he says he is? Who in their rights minds takes anything Lragir does seriously. - other than Azeris LOL

    4. #34
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      Re: Armenia's Energy sector

      Quote Originally Posted by Vrej1915 View Post
      Just a little description of our Gas network, to make the debate clearer, since the subject is:
      - of strategic nature, economy/security/military.
      - one of the sole fields, where at least theoritically we may have a good economic potential, and a place on a regional scale, if transit plans were to be implemented.
      - a field, where our national interests DO NOT COINCIDE, to say the least, with Russia's.

      SOVIET LEGACY:
      Gas is a relatively modern energy for SRA, and the Transcausasus in general. It was developed in the 70's and on. The Armenian SR was not seen as an entity, but in the frame of the Transcaucasian 3 republics.
      There were 3 Gas pipes entering Armenian territory, and thus bringing Russia's Gas. Back then, Baku was not a significant producer, and Armenia's economy was largely based on petro-chemistry, notably the 2 major complexes of Yerevan (Nayirit), and Vanazor (aka-Kirovakan/ Chimprom factory).
      1- The Northern pipe, passing by North Ossetia, Georgia, Marneul (Treghk), Ayrum, Vanazor...
      This medium size pipe was secondary, in the general plan of the GOSPLAN's Transcausaus Gas network in full development then.
      2- The main Gas pipe coming from Kazakh/Aghstafa (Az), to Ijevan. Was ment to be the major pipe for Yerevan.
      3- The special Pipe for Nakhitchevan, specially built on the demand of Mr Aliyev Heidar, then the "main" boss of the Transcaucasus, well placed in the Politburo of Moskwa, and close accomplice of Brejnev. This went from Akna(aka-Agdam), Askeran,Stepanakert, Shushi, Perzor(aka-Lacin), Goris, Sisian, Shahabunk(aka-Shahpuz, Nakh), Nakhitchevan.
      The main asset of Armenia: In the entire network, there was a medium size strategic reserve, built in Apovian, in the territory of big salt deposit (natural salt mine reserves). This is a very favorable geological strata, safe, economical, easy to expand, if necessary.
      Since the idea of independance, war, let alone a blockade was not even imaginable, the aim of the reserve was to insure the security of the network, in case there was an accident, on the pipes coming from Russia.

      WAR:
      During the war, and pre-war period, as soon as it had the capacity, Azerbaijan cut the main Gas pipe of Armenia, coming to Ijevan, as it cut the rail & road communications.
      For a while, even during part of the dark and cold winter 1991, thanks to the necessity to sent Gas to Nakhitchevan and Shushi, Baku was forced to sent some gas true Stepanakert and Goris.
      Thus, while bombarded and encirceled, living in the basements and the dark, Stepanakertzis did have some gas, to keep warm...
      Having no direct pipe link from Goris to Yerevan, via Armenian territory (the network passed via Nakhitchevan), Armenia could not divert some gas to its central network, even if the pressure would definitely not been enough, since the Armenian network was dependant from Nakhitchevan , even for its internal transport.
      Having Lost Its main pipe, and the pipe via NKR and the south, the only entrance left was the pipe via Georgia. All along, the Georgians syphoned shamelessly huge parts of the gas ment for Yerevan, and even more so, as the pipe did go via Treghk (aka Marneul), now mainly an azeri inhabited region of of Georgia, borderin 2/3 of Armenia's Northern Border with Georgia, the azeri services blew up this pipe time and time again, at their will, if I do remember well, might be 20 times ... thus the cold years...


      INDEPENDANCE:
      As soon as relative peace was established, the idea of a Gas pipe from Iran was evident.
      First plans were layed in 1996.
      But Russia Blocked with all its might, to exclude any possiilty of Transit, of Iranian Gas to Europe.... And since at tat time Gas price was very cheap, arround 50 USD that time, the Armenian authorities did not felt the emergency of an Iranian source.
      With time passing, Russian/Georgian relations deteriorating, the only pipe coming in via Georgia got older and older. Allready under sised..; plus, Georgia solving its gas import via its close alliance with Baku and Ankara, the northern pipe appeared more fragile as ever. At first shot of a new war, we may be certain, that Baku will decide to blow out the pipe coming from Georgia, regardeless what Maskwa, Tiflis, or anybody else could think about, since it has all ability to do so...
      The only hope was the reserves in Apovian, thus turning to VERY HIGH STRATEGIC OBJECT for Armenia.
      With a new factor. Georgia being in fact independant from russian gas, has no more any incentive, to haste the potential repairs necessary... (already in 92-94, often repairs were done by teams sent from Armenia).
      Anyway, during Kocharian years, some very imprtant strategic plans were implemented, enabling Armenia to face a new war in a more operative situation: The tunnel of Tilijan was finished, the Spantaryan/Ketchud (Vorotan/Arpa) tunnel finalised, even if it effectively never transported a drop of water to Sevan, the road linking Ijevan to Vanatzor was built, the second road directly from Kapan to Meghri, via Dzav (bypassing Kajaran pass and Nakhitchevan threat) etc...
      In this same logic, and even with much delay, due to Russian veto, the pipe from Iran was built.
      It was built by Iranian finances, and state budget of Armenia. The Russians refused to finance, thus the pipe was State property, independant from already partially russian hold Hayrusgazart.
      Plus, Armenia had to built a second section, inside its territory, linking Sisian with Ararat, to bypass the Nakhitchevan blockade, of the Soviet era network...

      The reason/pretext permitting the construction (ok of Moskwa), was to use it in a Gas/electricity swap plan with Iran, using thus the V block of Hraztan power plant, yet not built, and planned during Soviet era, and in fact overcapacity for shrinked Armenian industry...

      This point is very important, to understand our Iranian partners.
      They did not really need the power generating capacity of Hraztan, but on a long range perspective, accepted the idea, to bypass the veto of Moskwa, having the firm hope, to turn, even the forcefully minimized pipe's infrastructure, as a transit road, to export to Europe (since most important and harassing work, the earth and infrastructure are done, adding a bigger pipe next the existing demands much less efforts and funds.)

      When if fact, our regime passed the new pipe, from state control to Russians (Hayrusgazart), and then ended up selling not only its network, the Apovian reserves, plus the OBLIGATION to buy only rusian gas for the coming 30 years, he Iranians have grounds to feel betrayed.

      In all logic, this policy is not in best terest of Armenia, even if it is for the regime ???
      Quote Originally Posted by londontsi View Post
      Vrej

      Thank you for very informative explanation of events relating to issues in the energy sector.
      I used to follow the news in those days but never managed to join the dots.
      Very strategic for the country and matter of life and death during those years.

      You seem very informed therefore I have to ask, why do you rely so much on that crap paper lrakir?


      .
      Quote Originally Posted by Vrej1915 View Post
      Once again, "I do not rely on", I use articles published in.
      If you consider that you have a better choice, please do propose in this:
      http://forum.hyeclub.com/showthread....llowed-to-read

      Why: because I do not find same subjects elsewhere.

      Do you consider my quoted articles as crap?: please have a sit, and show which argument posted by me is crap, I would be happy to read your view.
      Quote Originally Posted by Serjik View Post
      Did it ever occur to anyone that this Vrej charakter is not who he says he is? Who in their rights minds takes anything Lragir does seriously. - other than Azeris LOL
      First quote by Vrej is highly informative and instructive. If one reads of Vrej's concern for the waters of Seven & other waters & invironment &, &, & it's easy to see genuine concern connected to an intellect of merit.
      If you read Londontsi's post above,you see an exercise in civil conversation that is clear, to the point and pleasant (ime).
      If you read Vrej's reply, again you see a clear intelligent civil response.
      The basic grass roots "brainstorming" to seek potential solutions that Hakob advocates, is IMO the only option we actually have. Provided we have that at all.
      IMO , Vrej has written too many sound things to bring question of character or patriotism into question.
      Read Vrej's last post.
      There is no question that Russia is pressuring us, to there advantage. Russia is not acting like the friend who sacrifices to help his friend get back on their feet & stand on their own.
      Russia has made many sacrifices for Armenia, but always in the context them remaining our leaders.
      We, Armenians don't have any true friends amongst the people's.
      As I've said before on a number of occasions ... We (Armenians) are the only ones who care about Hayastan.
      If we, from the ground up, do not figure out how to get out of this (these) impossible situation, well expect more of the same.
      The tutorial on our gas that you posted above Vrej was most helpful. I like Londontsi never understood this with such clarity until your post.
      Artashes
      HARK

    5. #35
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      Re: Armenia's Energy sector

      My Dear,
      Russia, nor any other power did ever made any sacrifices for Armenia.
      And it is just normal.
      Only servant minded peoples (like us, having lost statehood for a millennium) think that making sacrifices for an other, would be payed back by gratitude, and return 'love'.
      This kind of criteria does not exist in state relationship.
      Only mutual interest, and respect due the might of the partner (not always military), dictate relations.
      No one asks Russia to do sacrifices for us.
      All I say, we need to force Russia, however unrealistic it might seem, to respect our basic, vital national interests.
      And to do that, N°1 condition, is STOP SAYING AMEN to every Russian betrayal, on the ground of groundless Russophylia.
      The best way to encourage Russia's treacherous acts, is to forgive its past criminal behaviour towards us.....

    6. #36
      Azatavrear Eddo211's Avatar
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      Re: Armenia's Energy sector

      Quote Originally Posted by Vrej1915 View Post
      My Dear,
      Russia, nor any other power did ever made any sacrifices for Armenia.
      And it is just normal.
      Only servant minded peoples (like us, having lost statehood for a millennium) think that making sacrifices for an other, would be payed back by gratitude, and return 'love'.
      This kind of criteria does not exist in state relationship.
      Only mutual interest, and respect due the might of the partner (not always military), dictate relations.
      No one asks Russia to do sacrifices for us.
      All I say, we need to force Russia, however unrealistic it might seem, to respect our basic, vital national interests.
      And to do that, N°1 condition, is STOP SAYING AMEN to every Russian betrayal, on the ground of groundless Russophylia.
      The best way to encourage Russia's treacherous acts, is to forgive its past criminal behaviour towards us.....
      Now this how we should all be thinking....there is no doubt that we need Russia as an ally and most of us like Russia even born there but that shouldn't mean forgetting the reality of the past or aligning all of Armenia's national/foreign policies 100 percent with Russian policies.
      B0zkurt Hunter

    7. #37
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      Re: Armenia's Energy sector

      Quote Originally Posted by Eddo211 View Post
      Now this how we should all be thinking....there is no doubt that we need Russia as an ally and most of us like Russia even born there but that shouldn't mean forgetting the reality of the past or aligning all of Armenia's national/foreign policies 100 percent with Russian policies.
      Exactly what I say.
      If you do not want Russia to sell your vital interests, start by reminding its betrayals, and your anger, memory about that.
      No threat of reversal/or certain impunity: best way to get same dish served again!

    8. #38
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      Re: Armenia's Energy sector

      Quote Originally Posted by Vrej1915 View Post
      My Dear,
      Russia, nor any other power did ever made any sacrifices for Armenia.
      And it is just normal.
      Only servant minded peoples (like us, having lost statehood for a millennium) think that making sacrifices for an other, would be payed back by gratitude, and return 'love'.
      This kind of criteria does not exist in state relationship.
      Only mutual interest, and respect due the might of the partner (not always military), dictate relations.
      No one asks Russia to do sacrifices for us.
      All I say, we need to force Russia, however unrealistic it might seem, to respect our basic, vital national interests.
      And to do that, N�1 condition, is STOP SAYING AMEN to every Russian betrayal, on the ground of groundless Russophylia.
      The best way to encourage Russia's treacherous acts, is to forgive its past criminal behaviour towards us.....
      ---- only servant minded people --- think that making sacrifices for an other, would be paid back by gratitude, and return love ---- and it is just normal ---
      ---- this kind of criteria does not exist in state relationships ----

      Both you (Vrej) & Hakakan have pointed out to me that it's "normal" for a state to be out for their best interests when dealing with all others (I paraphrase).
      I have stood corrected in the sense that is is reasonable for an individual or state to be concerned for their selves.
      However, the conduct of the individual & the state are the same.
      The state represents the collective individuals & and the individual is a representitive of his people's, state, or country.
      I, as an individual, do represent the mores & conduct of my family & represent how they brought me up.
      To conduct myself badly is a tarnish on my family & would cause them to wonder where I learned such bad conduct.
      Both you and Hakakan say it is "normal" to act in a self centered bigoted way.
      I say it is the common real politk, BUT not normal.
      There is a difference to the common conduct & what's actually normal.
      Normal is kindness for the sake of kindness. It may not (and is not) what is commonly done, but that is what an honest, decent conduct would (and should) dictate be done, if one wants to qualify for being normal.
      To say, because the common conduct is to act like a blind, self centered a$s hole, does not make that conduct normal.
      This conduct cannot be justified BECAUSE everyone else is doing it.
      When you say -- only servant minded people think that making sacrifices for other, would be paid back by gratitude, and return love---
      I adamantly disagree.
      Our people have honestly & and decently worked, contributed, & sacrificed across this globe, but rarely been acknowledged.
      It may be the real politk for virtually all the other nations to take the credit as their own, and NOT show gratitude & return love in kind, but that is nothing more than self centered bigotry.
      Are you advocating that you would not return or at least recognize a kind selfless act in kind??
      Do you the the individual should be taught such??
      It is one thing to teach understanding & recognition of the underhanded conduct of this world, but quit another thing to condone it, or classify it as normal.
      I know I've struggled to make this point, but had to try.
      Artashes
      HARK

    9. #39
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      Re: Armenia's Energy sector

      Quote Originally Posted by Artashes View Post
      ---- only servant minded people --- think that making sacrifices for an other, would be paid back by gratitude, and return love ---- and it is just normal ---
      ---- this kind of criteria does not exist in state relationships ----

      Both you (Vrej) & Hakakan have pointed out to me that it's "normal" for a state to be out for their best interests when dealing with all others (I paraphrase).
      I have stood corrected in the sense that is is reasonable for an individual or state to be concerned for their selves.
      However, the conduct of the individual & the state are the same.
      The state represents the collective individuals & and the individual is a representitive of his people's, state, or country.
      I, as an individual, do represent the mores & conduct of my family & represent how they brought me up.
      To conduct myself badly is a tarnish on my family & would cause them to wonder where I learned such bad conduct.
      Both you and Hakakan say it is "normal" to act in a self centered bigoted way.
      I say it is the common real politk, BUT not normal.
      There is a difference to the common conduct & what's actually normal.
      Normal is kindness for the sake of kindness. It may not (and is not) what is commonly done, but that is what an honest, decent conduct would (and should) dictate be done, if one wants to qualify for being normal.
      To say, because the common conduct is to act like a blind, self centered a$s hole, does not make that conduct normal.
      This conduct cannot be justified BECAUSE everyone else is doing it.
      When you say -- only servant minded people think that making sacrifices for other, would be paid back by gratitude, and return love---
      I adamantly disagree.
      Our people have honestly & and decently worked, contributed, & sacrificed across this globe, but rarely been acknowledged.
      It may be the real politk for virtually all the other nations to take the credit as their own, and NOT show gratitude & return love in kind, but that is nothing more than self centered bigotry.
      Are you advocating that you would not return or at least recognize a kind selfless act in kind??
      Do you the the individual should be taught such??
      It is one thing to teach understanding & recognition of the underhanded conduct of this world, but quit another thing to condone it, or classify it as normal.
      I know I've struggled to make this point, but had to try.
      Artashes
      My Dear,
      Sorry if I shocked you.
      In a moral sense, you are right, that's not good.
      But unfortunately in REALPOLITICS, that's the way things work.

    10. #40
      Azatavrear Eddo211's Avatar
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      Re: Armenia's Energy sector

      Quote Originally Posted by Artashes View Post
      ---- only servant minded people --- think that making sacrifices for an other, would be paid back by gratitude, and return love ---- and it is just normal ---
      ---- this kind of criteria does not exist in state relationships ----

      Both you (Vrej) & Hakakan have pointed out to me that it's "normal" for a state to be out for their best interests when dealing with all others (I paraphrase).
      I have stood corrected in the sense that is is reasonable for an individual or state to be concerned for their selves.
      However, the conduct of the individual & the state are the same.
      The state represents the collective individuals & and the individual is a representitive of his people's, state, or country.
      I, as an individual, do represent the mores & conduct of my family & represent how they brought me up.
      To conduct myself badly is a tarnish on my family & would cause them to wonder where I learned such bad conduct.
      Both you and Hakakan say it is "normal" to act in a self centered bigoted way.
      I say it is the common real politk, BUT not normal.
      There is a difference to the common conduct & what's actually normal.
      Normal is kindness for the sake of kindness. It may not (and is not) what is commonly done, but that is what an honest, decent conduct would (and should) dictate be done, if one wants to qualify for being normal.
      To say, because the common conduct is to act like a blind, self centered a$s hole, does not make that conduct normal.
      This conduct cannot be justified BECAUSE everyone else is doing it.
      When you say -- only servant minded people think that making sacrifices for other, would be paid back by gratitude, and return love---
      I adamantly disagree.
      Our people have honestly & and decently worked, contributed, & sacrificed across this globe, but rarely been acknowledged.
      It may be the real politk for virtually all the other nations to take the credit as their own, and NOT show gratitude & return love in kind, but that is nothing more than self centered bigotry.
      Are you advocating that you would not return or at least recognize a kind selfless act in kind??
      Do you the the individual should be taught such??
      It is one thing to teach understanding & recognition of the underhanded conduct of this world, but quit another thing to condone it, or classify it as normal.
      I know I've struggled to make this point, but had to try.
      Artashes
      Artahes what you just described is the Armenians biggest weakness and what has killed us in history.......I would never want us to change, I don't think we can, but we must be more careful to who we extend our kindness and trust.
      B0zkurt Hunter

    11. #41
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      Re: Armenia's Energy sector

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      15 հունվարի, 2014
      Հայաստանի Հանրապետության կառավարությունը հունվարի 16-ի նիստում ներառել է «Հայռուսգազարդի» բաժնետոմսերի 20 %-ը «Գազպրոմին» վաճառելու հարցը: Առաջին անգամ հրապարակվել է նաև ՀՀ էներգետիկայի և բնական պաշարների նախարարության և «Գազպրոմի» միջև կնքվելիք պայմանագրի տեքստը: Հարցը կառավարության նիստում պետք է քննարկվի հետևյալ տեսանկյունից՝ թույլ տալ էներգետիկայի և բնական պաշարների նախարարությանը ՀՀ անունից բաժնետոմսեր վաճառել «Գազպրոմին»: Ի սկզբանե նախատեսված է եղել, որ ՀՀ էներգետիկայի և բնական պաշարների նախարարությունն իր անունից կկնքի պայմանագիրը, որպես կատարումն 2013 թվականի դեկտեմբերի 2-ին Երևանում ստորագրված՝ «Հայաստանի Հանրապետության Կառավարության և Ռուսաստանի Դաշնության Կառավարության միջև «Հայռուսգազարդ» փակ բաժնետիրական ընկերության բաժնետոմսերի առուվաճառքի և հետագա գործունեության պայմանների մասին» համաձայնագրի: Ըստ այդ համաձայնագրի՝ պայմանագիրը կողմերի միջև պետք է կնքվի մինչև հունվարի 17-ը: Սակայն ՀՀ ֆինանսների նախարարությունն առարկել է՝ էներգետիկայի եւ բնական պաշարների նախարարությունը նման պայմանագիր կարող է կնքել միայն կառավարության լիազորությամբ, այլապես չի կարող հանդես գալ ՀՀ անունից: Այդ առարկության հետևանքով էլ հարցը հայտնվել է կառավարության նիստի օրակարգում:

      Հրապարակված պայմանագրի տեքստի համաձայն՝ «Գազպրոմին» վաճառվելու է 12,6 մլն հատ սովորական անվանական բաժնետոմս(յուրաքանչյուրը՝ 5026,5 դրամ արժեքով), որը կազմում է «Հայռուսգազարդի» հիմնադիր կապիտալի 20.0007 %-ը: Այսպիսով՝ Հայաստանի կողմից վաճառվող գույքի արժեքը կազմում է 63,3 մլրդ դրամ (մոտ 155 մլն դոլար):

      Պայմանագրում հատուկ նշվել է, որ վաճառքը պետք է իրականացվի այնպես, որ «Գազպրոմը» դառնա բաժնետոմսերի 100 % սեփականատեր: Եթե դա ինչ-ինչ պատճառներով տեղի չունենա, ապա ՀՀ կառավարությունը պարտավորվում է ետ գնել իր բաժնետոմսերը ու փոխհատուցել «Գազպրոմի» վնասները: Պայմանագրի այս դրույթի դեմ առարկել է ՀՀ ֆինանսների նախարարությունը: Ըստ այդ առարկության՝ Հայաստանը պետք է վաճառի իր գույքը, ոչ թե պարտավորվի ապահովել «Գազպրոմի» համար 100% բաժնեմաս: Ներկայացնենք ֆինանսների նախարարության առարկությունը. «...անհասկանալի է, թե նախարարությունը` որպես վաճառող կողմ, ինչու պետք է ապահովի «Գազպրոմ» ԲԲԸ-ի 100 տոկոս բաժնետեր լինելու պայմանը: Նշվածի ռիսկայնությունը կայանում է նրանում, որ եթե ինչ-ինչ պատճառներով «Հայռուսգազարդ» ՓԲԸ-ի բաժնետոմսերի քանակն ավելանա, ապա նախարարությունն իր վրա պարտավորություն կվերցնի` 63 333 900 000 ՀՀ դրամով հետ գնելու վաճառված բաժնետոմսերը»:

      Սակայն այս առարկությանը էներգետիկայի եւ բնական պաշարների նախարարությունը պատասխանել է, որ այսպիսի դրույթ նախատեսված է դեկտեմբերի 2-ի համաձայնագրով:

      «Հայռուսգազարդի» հիմնադիր կապիտալը գնահատված է 316.65 մլրդ դրամ (մոտ 800 մլն դոլար):

    12. #42
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      Re: Armenia's Energy sector

      Kocharian Again Slams Government Over Gas Deals

      Emil Danielyan
      Հրապարակված է՝ 17.01.2014
      http://www.armenialiberty.org/conten.../25233705.html
      Former President Robert Kocharian on Friday reaffirmed his criticism of the Armenian government’s controversial energy agreements with Moscow and its secret subsidizing of the price of natural gas supplied by Russia.

      In that regard, Kocharian shrugged off through his office Energy Minister Armen Movsisian’s claims that those agreements are more beneficial for Armenia than deals which he had cut with the Russians while in office.

      Movsisian singled out on Wednesday a so-called “assets-for-debt” deal that was signed in November 2002. It granted Russia ownership of Armenia’s largest thermal power plant and four other state-run enterprises in payment for Yerevan’s $100 million debt to Moscow.

      In a statement, Kocharian’s office argued that key terms of the 2002 settlement were worked out by a Russian-Armenian intergovernmental commission that was co-headed by then Defense Minister Serzh Sarkisian and a Russian deputy prime minister. It said that Movsisian, who has served as energy minister since 2001, was also a “key participant of the process.”

      “Robert Kocharian continues to believe that the [2002] agreement was good and beneficial and that the intergovernmental commission did a good job. Judging from his interview, Movsisian has rethought the evaluation of the work done by him and his personal contribution to that agreement,” the statement said scathingly. It poured scorn on Movsisian’s “selective memory.”

      Speaking to Tert.am, Movsisian implied that Kocharian has no moral right to deplore the secret subsidies, effectively acknowledged by the Armenian government late last year, because the ex-president himself sold energy assets to Russia’s Gazprom giant to prevent gas price hikes. The minister pointed to a complex Russian-Armenian energy accord that was signed in 2006. It gradually raised Gazprom’s share in Armenia’s ARG gas distribution network to 80 percent and gave the Russian monopoly control over a gas pipeline from Iran that was being constructed at the time.

      Gazprom paid at the time almost $250 million to buy an incomplete thermal power plant located in the central Armenian town of Hrazdan. The Kocharian government used the bulk of that money for subsidizing domestic gas prices.

      Kocharian’s office said that the ex-president’s administration paid those subsidies openly and transparently, unlike the current government that denied until recently that Gazprom sharply raised its gas tariff for Armenia in 2011. The government ceded its 20 percent share in ARG to Gazprom to clear a $300 million debt incurred as a result of the secret subsidizing.

      Russian-Armenian agreements signed last December also granted Gazprom 30-year privileges in the Armenian energy market. In particular, the current and future authorities in Yerevan will not be allowed to raise taxes paid by the Gazprom-owned distribution network or take any other measures that would narrow its profit margins.

      Kocharian described these concessions as “shocking” in remarks posted on his unofficial website on Monday. The criticism was part of his intensifying war of words with Prime Minister Tigran Sarkisan over the government’s economic policies. Signaling his return to politics, the ex-president also launched thinly veiled attacks on Serzh Sarkisian, his successor and erstwhile political ally.

      Movsisian and some senior members of the ruling Republican Party of Armenia (HHK), notably Education Minister Armen Ashotian, have hit back at Kocharian this week in a sign of the Sarkisian administration’s concerns about his possible comeback. The latest statement released by Kocharian’s office slammed Ashotian as well.

    13. #43
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      Re: Armenia's Energy sector

      17.01.14
      ArmRosgazprom renamed ‘Gazprom Armenia’ after Russian takeover
      http://www.armenianow.com/economy/51...as_deal_russia


      Alexey Miller, Chairman of the Gazprom Management Committee and Armen Movsisyan, Armenia’s Minister of Energy and Natural Resources have signed a Sales and Purchase Agreement for the remaining 20 percent of ArmRosgazprom’s shares. The document was signed in the Gazprom headquarters in Moscow on Thursday “in furtherance of the intergovernmental Agreement between the Russian Federation and the Republic of Armenia”, a Gazprom press release said.

      As a result of the deal, Gazprom’s ownership stake in ArmRosgazprom was increased to 100 percent. The company will be named Gazprom Armenia.

      “This deal fully complies with the spirit of strategic cooperation between Russia and Armenia. Gazprom has been successfully cooperating with Armenian partners in many areas and for many years. We have implemented large-scale projects both in main gas transportation and power generation. But above all, Armenia has achieved a major socially important result – we reached the gasification level of 96 percent.

      Another key area of our cooperation is the NGV (natural-gas-vehicle) sector. Armenia has even more CNG filling stations than Russia. We all have something to learn from our Armenian colleagues.

      “Gazprom has always been and will remain a reliable partner for Armenia,” said Alexey Miller.

      ____________
      NB: the comany's name was HAY-RUS-GAZ-ART, which in English must have been ARM-RUS-GAS-PROD, and not Prom...

    14. #44
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      Re: Armenia's Energy sector

      Armenia: Citizens Feeling Gouged by High Cost of Russian Gas
      January 24, 2014 - 12:44pm, by Marianna Grigoryan

      Armenia is experiencing a Russian-style winter this year, and despite Yerevan’s plans to join the Moscow-led Customs Union, consumers are not catching a break when it comes to the cost of Russian gas. Instead, the price of Russian gas imports has risen 18 percent over last year, a development that is stoking public anger with the government’s decision to cast its economic lot with the Kremlin.

      With temperatures dropping as low as -20 Celsius (-4 Fahrenheit), many Armenians have been hit with whopping gas bills that are wreaking havoc with their monthly budgets. Based on interviews by EurasiaNet.org with representatives of 30 separate families paying their gas bills at Yerevan post offices, the average December gas bill for a family of four stood at between 50,000-60,000 drams ($123-$148) – roughly an increase of over 40 percent from last year. Officially, an average monthly income stands at 150,960 drams per month, or $370.

      “I kept potatoes in my kitchen, and I used to grow flowers there; they all are frozen now, and I must give my entire pension [25,000 drams or $61] to pay for the small amount of gas I’ve used,” said one elderly woman, wallet in hand, waiting to pay her gas bill in a Yerevan post office.

      Back in early December, before the cold spell set in, supporters of President Serzh Sargsyan’s administration painted a different scenario – one in which Yerevan’s September decision to join the Customs Union would ensure that citizens reaped significant economic benefits. Russian President Vladimir Putin, during a December visit to Armenia, reinforced that impression with a pledge that Armenians would be paying Russian “domestic prices” for gas. Gazprom CEO Alexei Miller made a similar promise. But no Russian official ever provided details, and the gas price never decreased, instead it has gone up.

      At present Armenia pays $189 per 1,000 cubic meters of Russian gas received at its border; consumers, however, pay a far higher price – 158,000 drams, or $391, per 1,000 cubic meters, an 18-percent increase from the past.

      Many customers cannot believe their eyes when they see their gas bills, said one Yerevan post-office employee, who asked not to be named. “They repeatedly ask whether the final sum is correct,” she said. “Some get mad and start cursing the authorities. Others leave in silence, without paying, and ask for installment-plan options.”

      Naira Zohrabian, head of the parliamentary faction of the opposition Prosperous Armenia Party, said workers are being pushed to the economic brink. “I was shocked to see the bills I had to pay” – 67,000 drams ($166) for gas in December, she said. “My salary is comparatively high (245,000 drams or about $605). … I cannot imagine how people earning a salary of 40,000-50,000 drams (roughly $98-$123) pay such amounts.”

      As popular anger grows over high gas bills, representatives of the governing Republican Party of Armenia have remained largely silent. Some have simply advised citizens to skimp. “Everybody should think about being economical, despite their income level,” said MP Manvel Badeian, who claims he himself received a 300,000-dram (over $740) gas bill for December.

      Sneers generally greet such statements.

      “What economy are they talking about? Are they mocking us? With the temperature 20 degrees below zero, and three small kids at home, is it normal to pay 60,000 drams [$148] for a single gas heater?” asked 39-year-old Marat Martirosian, a construction worker in Yerevan. “Should we turn off the heater and let our children freeze?”

      One middle-aged Yerevan taxi driver, who declined to give his name, agreed. “They said gas will become cheaper when we join the Customs Union, and people will live better, but if they go on like this, nobody will stay in this country,” he said. “They gave everything to the Russians. Why don’t they respond to the people now?”

      The Republican Party’s parliamentary faction head, Galust Sahakian, brushed off public complaints, and also emphasized the need to economize. People would be even angrier if there were no gas at all, he told the news site Yerkir.am on January 14. “People now are in such a situation that they try to find someone to blame, and they are blaming the government for this,” Sahakian said.

      For their part, opposition leaders appear more focused on the government’s controversial pension-reform plan. Arman Musinian, spokesperson for the Armenian National Congress, the country’s largest opposition coalition, said that “discussions about our steps are being held at the moment.” The coalition views “all issues as part of an integral whole,” he said.

      Political analyst Manvel Sarkisian, director of the Armenian Center for National and International Studies, believes the potential exists for public anger over gas prices to boil over. “If a powerful grassroots movement were launched, perhaps opposition parties would unite in light of current developments,” he said. “There is a chance for that at the moment.”

      http://www.eurasianet.org/node/67976
      <<եթե զենք էլ չլինի' ես քարերով կկրվեմ>>

    15. #45
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      Re: Armenia's Energy sector

      U.S. company buys Armenian power plants in $250 million deal
      YEREVAN | Wed Jan 29, 2014 1:55pm EST

      YEREVAN (Reuters) - U.S. power company ContourGlobal said it will acquire three hydroelectric power plants in Armenia in a $250 million deal.

      The company said it had bought the Vorotan Hydro plants for $180 million and planned to invest an additional $70 million, making it the largest single U.S. private investment in the Caucasus country of 3.8 million.

      The deal may decrease Armenia's dependence on Russia, Yerevan's main trading partner and biggest foreign investor which is due to boost its control over the country's natural gas infrastructure.

      The Vorotan Hydro Cascade complex is a series of three hydroelectric power plants totalling 405 megawatts on the Vorotan river in southern Armenia.

      It accounts for about 15 percent of Armenia's power capacity and provides energy for 250,000 homes.

      A long-term power purchase agreement was signed on Wednesday between ContourGlobal and the Armenian government.

      The agreement says the company will invest $70 million over the next six years in a refurbishment program to modernize the plants and improve their performance and safety.

      Armenia plans to join a customs union led by its former Soviet master Russia and has approved a deal under which the Russian state gas export monopoly Gazprom (GAZP.MM) will take over full ownership of its subsidiary ArmRosgazprom, by acquiring the remaining 20 percent of shares from Armenia.

      Russia has invested $3 billion in the country with a GDP of $9.9 billion in 2012, according to the World Bank.

      (Reporting by Hasmik Mkrtchyan; Writing by Margarita Antidze; Editing by David Evans)

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