• porno
  • jigolo sitesi

  • Armenian Singles
    Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
    Results 16 to 22 of 22

    Thread: Preservation, conservation of monuments.

    1. #16
      Registered User
      Join Date
      May 2009
      Posts
      2,967

      Re: Preservation, conservation of monuments.

      Quote Originally Posted by Vrej1915 View Post
      A new piece of Negationism BBC style....
      Ani de-Armenised into a seljuk turk, georgian and ottoman empire...

      http://www.bbc.com/travel/story/2016...e-world-forgot

      When I go on the link ( in the UK) this is what I get.
      Just for the record the BBC World service is independently financed by the Foreign Office, ( foreign ministry),
      not that their UK counterpart bias is any better.

      Help
      BBC Worldwide (International Site)

      We're sorry but this site is not accessible from the UK as it is part of our international service and is not funded by the licence fee. It is run commercially by BBC Worldwide, a wholly-owned subsidiary of the BBC, the profits made from it go back to BBC programme-makers to help fund great new BBC programmes. You can find out more about BBC Worldwide and its digital activities at www.bbcworldwide.com.
      .
      Politics is not about the pursuit of morality nor what's right or wrong
      Its about self interest at personal and national level often at odds with the above.
      Great politicians pursue the National interest and small politicians personal interests

    2. #17
      Registered User
      Join Date
      May 2011
      Posts
      7,753

      Re: Preservation, conservation of monuments.



      https://www.hstry.co/timelines/the-g...ty-of-ani-60d4

      Quote Originally Posted by londontsi View Post
      When I go on the link ( in the UK) this is what I get.
      Just for the record the BBC World service is independently financed by the Foreign Office, ( foreign ministry),
      not that their UK counterpart bias is any better.



      .
      History
      The empire the world forgot
      Ruled by a dizzying array of kingdoms and empires over the centuries, the former regional power of Ani is now an eerie, abandoned city of ghosts.

      - magnific photo of Hovvi yegeghetzi under snow

      An abandoned city of ghosts
      Ruled by a dizzying array of kingdoms and empires over the centuries – from the Byzantines to the Ottomans – the city of Ani once housed many thousands of people, becoming a cultural hub and regional power under the medieval Bagratid Armenian dynasty. Today, it’s an eerie, abandoned city of ghosts that stands alone on a plateau in the remote highlands of northeast Turkey, 45km away from the Turkish border city of Kars. As you walk among the many ruins, left to deteriorate for over 90 years, the only sound is the wind howling through a ravine that marks the border between Turkey and Armenia.

      - photo of the rear parts of the walls, badly renovated or in ruins...

      The toll of many rulers
      Visitors who pass through Ani’s city walls are greeted with a panoramic view of ruins that span three centuries and five empires – including the Bagratid Armenians, Byzantines, Seljuk Turks, Georgians and Ottomans. The Ani plateau was ceded to Russia once the Ottoman Empire was defeated in the 1877-78 Russo-Turkish War. After the outbreak of World War I, the Ottomans fought to take back northeast Anatolia, and although they recaptured Ani and the surrounding area, the region was given to the newly formed Republic of Armenia. The site changed hands for the last time after the nascent Turkish Republic captured it during the 1920 eastern offensive in the Turkish War of Independence.

      - photo of the collabsed bridge on the Akhuryan, markink the border between occupied and Independant Armenias .

      A hotly contested territory
      The ruins of an ancient bridge over the Akhurian River, which winds its way at the bottom of the ravine to create a natural border, are fitting given the vexed state of Turkish-Armenian relations. The two countries have long disagreed over the mass killings of Armenians that took place under the Ottoman Empire during World War I, and Turkey officially closed its land border with Armenia in 1993 in response to a territorial conflict between Armenia and Turkey’s ally Azerbaijan.

      - photo of a "renovayed church"

      A bid to save the ruins
      Although the focus on Turkish-Armenian tension preoccupies most discussion of Ani, there’s an ongoing effort by archaeologists and activists to save the ruins, which have been abandoned in favour of more accessible and less historically contested sites from classical antiquity. Historians have long argued for Ani’s importance as a forgotten medieval nexus, and as a result, Ani is now on a tentative list for recognition as a Unesco World Heritage Site. With some luck and careful restoration work, which has begun in 2011, they may be able to forestall the hands of time.

      - photo of Armenian inscription and carvings on a wall of church, guess the Cathedral of Ani

      ‘The City of 1,001 Churches’
      At its height during the 11th Century, scholars estimate that Ani’s population reached as high as 100,000 people. Artistic renderings based on the site’s archaeological findings show a bustling medieval centre crowded with myriad homes, artisanal workshops and impressive churches scattered throughout.
      Known as “The City of 1,001 Churches”, Ani’s Armenian rulers and city merchants funded an extraordinary number of places of worship, all designed by the greatest architectural and artistic minds in their milieu. Although the nickname was hyperbole, archaeologists have discovered evidence of at least 40 churches, chapels and mausoleums to date.

      - photo of the Cathedral of Ani

      An imposing cathedral
      A rust-coloured brick redoubt, the Cathedral of Ani looms over the now-abandoned city. Although its dome collapsed in an earthquake in 1319 – and, centuries later, another earthquake destroyed its northwest corner – it is still imposing in scale. It was completed in 1001 under the reign of Armenian King Gagik I, when the wealth and population of Ani was at its peak. Trdat, the renowned Armenian architect who designed it, also served the Byzantines by helping them repair the dome of the Hagia Sophia.

      - photo of a renovation on halved church


      Half of a church
      Only one half of the Church of the Redeemer remains – a monument to both the artistic prowess of the Armenian Bagratid Dynasty and the inevitability of time. Propped up by extensive scaffolding now, the church was an impressive architectural feat when it was built. It featured 19 archways and a dome, all made from local reddish-brown volcanic basalt.
      The church also housed a fragment of the True Cross, upon which Jesus was crucified. The church’s patron, Prince Ablgharib Pahlavid, reportedly obtained the relic during a visit to the Byzantine court at Constantinople.

      - photo of Krikor Abughamretz church

      Half of a church
      Only one half of the Church of the Redeemer remains – a monument to both the artistic prowess of the Armenian Bagratid Dynasty and the inevitability of time. Propped up by extensive scaffolding now, the church was an impressive architectural feat when it was built. It featured 19 archways and a dome, all made from local reddish-brown volcanic basalt.
      The church also housed a fragment of the True Cross, upon which Jesus was crucified. The church’s patron, Prince Ablgharib Pahlavid, reportedly obtained the relic during a visit to the Byzantine court at Constantinople.

      - photo of the troglodyte undergrund parts of Ani, in the river canyon

      The remnants of an underground city
      Opposite the Church of St Gregory of the Abughamrentsare a series of caves dug out of the rock, which some historians speculate may predate Ani. The caves are sometimes described as Ani’s “underground city” and signs point to their use as tombs and churches. In the early 20th Century, some of these caves were still used as dwellings.

      - photo of a magnificent part of a church arc, still clearly painted makhaghat style, unprotected under open sky

      A church that keeps watch
      The Church of St Gregory of Tigran Honents stands vigilant over the ravine that separates Turkey and Armenia. Commissioned by a wealthy merchant and built in 1215, it was constructed when the then-controlling Kingdom of Georgia granted Ani as a fiefdom to a bloodline of Armenian rulers, the Zakarians. During the winter, the lonely church makes for a striking sight against the endless, snow-covered Armenian steppe in the distance.

      - photo of frescoes of Tigran Honentz dome

      Frescoes cover the walls
      The Church of St Gregory of Tigran Honents is one of Ani’s best preserved buildings, adorned with remnants of paintings depicting scenes from the life of Christ and St Gregory the Illuminator. Detailed fresco cycles did not ordinarily appear in Armenian art of the era, leading scholars to believe the artists were most likely Georgian.

      - photo of part of the King palace tranformed into "mosque' by occupation regime

      An Islamic minaret still stands
      The Seljuk Empire – a Turkish state in Anatolia that drove out the Byzantines and eventually gave way to the Ottoman Empire – controlled the greater area of what is today northeast Turkey and Armenia beginning in the mid-1000s. However, in 1072, the Seljuks granted control of Ani to an Islamic dynasty of Kurdish origin, the Shaddadids. The Shaddadids, in turn, left their mark on Ani with buildings like the mosque of Manuchihr, which is perched precariously on the edge of the cliff. Its minaret is still standing from when the mosque was constructed in the late 1000s; the rest of the mosque is most likely an addition from the 12th or 13th Centuries.

      - photo of the panorama seen fron inside the window of the palace

      Origins up for debate
      The original purpose of the mosque of Manuchihr is debated on both the Turkish and Armenian sides. Some contend that the building once served as a palace for the Armenian Bagratid dynasty and was only later converted into a mosque. Others argue that the structure was built as a mosque from the ground up, and thus was the first Turkish mosque in Anatolia. From 1906 to 1918, the mosque served as a museum of findings from Ani’s excavation by the Russian archaeologist Nicholas Marr. Regardless of the building’s origins, the mosque’s four elegant windows display spectacular views of the river and the other side of the gorge.

      - photo of the wall from inside,

      Once formidable city walls
      Ani’s city walls may seem ready to crumble, but when they were constructed in the 10th Century, they made for a formidable defence. The Bagratid family of kings built them in order to fortify their new capital and, over the centuries, they protected the city’s occupants against siege after siege by various armies. These ramparts, along with Ani’s inhabitants, witnessed bloody conflicts between the Bagratids and the Byzantines, and the Byzantines and the Seljuks.
      Despite Ani’s history as a field of warfare, the ruins also represent many periods throughout history where the city saw a remarkable interchange of cultures, religions and artistic motifs.
      - photo of the panrama

      _Interactive poster


      If you liked this story, sign up for the weekly bbc.com features newsletter, called “If You Only Read 6 Things This Week”. A handpicked selection of stories from BBC Future, Earth, Culture, Capital, Travel and Autos, delivered to your inbox every Friday.
      Last edited by Vrej1915; 03-17-2016 at 02:54 PM.

    3. #18
      Registered User
      Join Date
      May 2011
      Posts
      7,753

      Re: Preservation, conservation of monuments.

      THE GHOSTS OF EMPIRES PAST IN THE RUINED CITY OF ANI
      From the Bronze Age to the Turkish War of Independence and beyond
      Circa 1000 BC
      Bronze Age settlers create dwellings on the Ani plateau, leaving behind traces of pottery and small tools.
      (Credit: Michele Burgess/Alamy)
      5th Century
      The Armenian Kamsarankan dynastic family builds a citadel (pictured) at Ani.
      (Credit: Sémhur/Wikimedia Commons/CC BY-SA 3.0)
      961
      In a move to forge a legacy, King Ashot III of the Bagratid dynasty moves his kingdom’s capital from Kars to Ani, a sign of the city’s growing commercial and cultural importance (pictured: Armenian feudal kingdoms around 1000 AD).
      1045
      The Bagratid leaders of Ani are defeated by the Byzantines, who take the city as a long-awaited prize in their campaign against the Armenian kingdom.
      DID YOU KNOW?
      (Credit: VirtualANI)
      When Ani was the capital of Armenia (during the Bagratid dynasty), its population was estimated at 100,000, surpassing London and Paris at that time (pictured: details of an artistic rendering of Ani).
      (Credit: Hafiz-i Abru/Wikimedia Commons)
      1064
      The Seljuk Turks, led by Alp Arslan (depicted on his throne above), defeat the Byzantines and capture Ani.
      1072
      The Seljuks grant control of Ani to the Shaddadid dynasty.
      (Credit: Ivan Vdovin/Alamy)
      1199
      The Kingdom of Georgia, led by Queen Tamar, captures Ani from the Shaddadids (pictured: portrait of Queen Tamar from a Georgian 50 Lari banknote).
      (Credit: imageBROKER/Alamy)
      1236
      The Mongols invade Ani, capturing the city, which enters into a sustained period of decline.
      (Credit: Westend61 GmbH/Alamy)
      1319
      Ani is devastated by a tremendous earthquake, which causes the dome of its cathedral (pictured) to collapse. (Ani sits near the North Anatolian fault line, and many earthquakes – the biggest occurring in 1319, 1832 and 1988 – have devastated the city).
      15th Century
      Several Turkic dynasties, including the Karakoyunlus (also known as the Black Sheep Turkomans) and the Akkoyunlus each control Ani for a period of time.
      1579
      Ani is incorporated into the Ottoman Empire.
      DID YOU KNOW?
      (Credit-Armenica.org/Wikimedia Commons)
      Because of its many places of worship, Ani became known as “The City of 1,001 Churches”. While the nickname was hyperbole, archaeologists have found evidence of at least 40 related ruins to date.
      Credit: Dominic Dudley/Alamy)
      1650s
      Ani is gradually abandoned, except for a few surrounding villages, due to shifting trade routes and the rise of new regional centres of commerce.
      1878
      The city of Kars and the ruins at Ani are ceded to Russia as a part of the Ottoman Empire’s territorial losses from the Russo-Turkish War.
      1918
      The Ottoman Empire retakes Ani during a World War I campaign, but is forced to cede the region to the newly formed Armenian Republic after the Ottomans are defeated.
      1920
      Turkish forces under the command of Kâzım Karabekir capture Ani during the Turkish War of Independence. According to his memoirs, Karabekir ignored a command from a government minister to level the ruins. The Treaty of Kars in the following year officially recognizes Turkish sovereignty over the plateau.
      (Credit: Pacific Press/Alamy)
      1993
      Turkey closes its 311km land border with Armenia in response to the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict and initiates a diplomatic freeze that exists to this day.
      (Credit: Bob Gibbons/Alamy)
      Today
      Restoration efforts by the Turkish Ministry of Culture and Tourism are underway, and officials hope that 2016 will bring with it Unesco recognition of Ani as a World Heritage site.

    4. #19
      Registered User bell-the-cat's Avatar
      Join Date
      Oct 2004
      Posts
      4,137

      Re: Preservation, conservation of monuments.

      Quote Originally Posted by Vrej1915 View Post
      A new piece of Negationism BBC style....
      Ani de-Armenised into a seljuk turk, georgian and ottoman empire...

      http://www.bbc.com/travel/story/2016...e-world-forgot
      Could someone please post a copy of the text. (Maybe there is some way of working around the BBC blocking of their own content from UK residents, but I doubt anything from the BBC is worth the effort to do it.)

      Though I am making assumptions of content I have not seen, I would not be surprised it if is actually US sponsored negationism, fully supported by some Armenian academics in America, by a number in Europe too, and by Armenian ngos in Turkey like the Hrant Dink Foundation.
      Plenipotentiary meow!

    5. #20
      Registered User bell-the-cat's Avatar
      Join Date
      Oct 2004
      Posts
      4,137

      Re: Preservation, conservation of monuments.

      Quote Originally Posted by bell-the-cat View Post
      Could someone please post a copy of the text. (Maybe there is some way of working around the BBC blocking of their own content from UK residents, but I doubt anything from the BBC is worth the effort to do it.)

      Though I am making assumptions of content I have not seen, I would not be surprised it if is actually US sponsored negationism, fully supported by some Armenian academics in America, by a number in Europe too, and by Armenian ngos in Turkey like the Hrant Dink Foundation.
      Or has it already been posted, the "The empire the world forgot. Ruled by a dizzying array of kingdoms and empires over the centuries, the former regional power of Ani is now an eerie, abandoned city of ghosts" post above? The photo "captions" are not the real ones, I assume. If the point was to show inaccuracies in the BBC article, why not reproduce what the captions actually say?

      The article is full of the usual lazy clichés, plus a wide selections of lies and distortions. It is definitely partly derived from US Embassy / WMF produced propaganda, being entirely on message with its "remarkable interchange of cultures, religions and artistic motifs" bullxxxx.
      Plenipotentiary meow!

    6. #21
      Registered User
      Join Date
      May 2011
      Posts
      7,753

      Re: Preservation, conservation of monuments.

      Ինչ է արել Հասմիկ Պողոսյանը պաշտոնավարման 10 տարիների ընթացքում
      yerkira.am
      7 Հոկտեմբերի 2016,


      Ալեքսանդր Թամանյանն ասում էր, թե ճարտարապետությունը քարե սիմֆոնիա է: Հետաքրքիր է` ճարտարապետն ի՞նչ ժանրի «սիմֆոնիայի» կվերագրեր ներկայիս Երևանի տեսքը: Նայելով նորակառույցներին` միայն Արմենչիկի «սիմֆոնիաները» կարելի է հիշել. ինչքան Արմենչիկն է վաստակավոր արտիստ, այնքան էլ նորակառույցները` քարե սիմֆոնիա:

      ՀՀ մշակույթի նախկին նախարար Հասմիկ Պողոսյանի ճաշակը, հետաքրքրություններն ու գեղագիտական նախասիրությունները, ցավոք, նրա պաշտոնավարման 10 տարիների ընթացքում այդպես էլ չհամընկան Երևանի ճարտարապետական տեսքի, միջավայրի ընկալման հետ: Եթե նախկինում Հայաստանն աշխարհին հայտնի էր իր ճարտարապետությամբ, ապա այսօր ճարտարապետությունից ու Հին Երևանից գրեթե ոչինչ չի մնացել: Ճարտարապետական ու պատմական նշանակություն ունեցող կառույցները տարեցտարի հողին են հավասարեցվում` պատկան մարմինների լուռ համաձայնությամբ: «Ես իրավասու չեմ», «հարցն ուղղեք քաղաքապետարանին» պատասխաններով կամ էլ ուղղակի խուսափելով հանդիպել լրագրողների հետ` 10 տարի շարունակ` Հասմիկ Պողոսյանի պաշտոնավարման ժամանակ, մեկը մյուսի հետևից լուսանկարներ դարձան երբեմնի պատմամշակութային արժեքները:

      Հին Երևանը քանդելուց հետո մինչև վերջերս Պողոսյանը նշում էր. «Հին Երևան» ծրագրի շրջանակներում կառուցապատումը կանգնած է, քանի որ չենք կարողանում հետաքրքրվող, շահագրգիռ անձանց գտնել»: Բնականաբար, շահագրգիռ անձինք նախընտրում են ոչ թե հնարած Հին Երևան տեսնել, այլ` ամեն շենքն իր տեղում, իր միջավայրում:

      Փոխարենը Պողոսյանի սրտին դարդ էր եղել Լենինի արձանի` հրապարակից հեռացնելը, արձանի տեղն, ըստ նրա, դատարկ է մնացել. «Իմ անձնական կարծիքն է, որ հրապարակում ինչ-որ դատարկություն, այսինքն՝ ոչ թե դատարկություն, այլ ավարտվելու մի տարր ուզում է, բայց ասում եմ՝ Լենինի արձանը քաղաքական էր, այսպես էր, այնպես էր, բայց իր պատվանդանով, լուծումներով հանճարեղ գործ էր»:

      Ուշագրավ է այն հանգամանքը, որ նախարարը նույն սրտացավությամբ էր խոսում թե' Լենինի արձանի և թե' մարշալ Բաբաջանյանի խրոխտ արձանի մասին։ Ավելին, Պողոսյանի խոսքով՝ ինքը դեռ պետք է մարսեր և որոշ ժամանակ անց միայն կարծիք հայտներ. կարծիքը, բնականաբար, հետագայում այդպես էլ չհայտնեց։ Արձանների հետ կապված՝ նախկին նախարարի տեսակետը հստակ իմանալ դժվար է /նախկինում արդեն անդրադարձել էինք այս խնդրին/, ինչպես ցանկացած այլ հարցի դեպքում։

      Տիկին նախարարը հմուտ էր ոչ միայն տեսակետ չհայտնելու, այլ նաև փաստ, խախտման արձանագրում անտեսելու առումով։ Վերահսկիչ պալատը, օրինակ, խախտումներ էր հայտնաբերել` Քոբայրավանքի և Հնեավանքի վերականգնողական աշխատանքների հետ կապված, դեռ առաջին` 2007-2008 թթ. ստուգումների ընթացքում. 321 միլիոն դրամ էր հատկացվել ընկերությանը, որը պետք է զբաղվեր վանական համալիրների վերականգնողական աշխատանքներով, բայց արդյունքում հայտնաբերվել էր 57 միլիոն դրամի՝ փաստաթղթերով չհիմնավորված ծախս:

      Իսկ 2011-ին ՎՊ-ն հայտարարել էր, որ հուշարձանների վերականգնման աշխատանքներին մասնակցում են ոլորտի հետ ընդհանրապես կապ չունեցող շինարարական կազմակերպություններ: «Վահանավանքում, Հնեվանքում, Քարկոփում վերականգնման աշխատանքները կատարվել են թերի եւ ոչ մասնագիտորեն: Խախտվել է պատմամշակութային հուշարձանների ոչ միայն արտաքին տեսքը, այլեւ օգտագործվել է դրանց ոչ հարիր շինանյութ: Նախապես հաշվարկված եւ համարակալված քարերի փոխարեն օգտագործվել է նոր, այլ տեսակի քար»,- նշված է ՎՊ զեկույցում:

      Ոլորտի մասնագետներն ահազանգում էին` Գանձասարի պարիսպները նորոգվում են համապատասխան նորմերի խախտումով: Լսողն ո՞վ էր: Բանը հասավ նրան, որ մարդիկ, ճարտարապետները սկսեցին դիմել ԼՂՀ իշխանությանը:

      Երիտասարդական պալատը, ճիշտ է, քանդեցին ոչ Հասմիկ Պողոսյանի պաշտոնավարման օրոք` 2004-ին, սակայն մինչ օրս Երիտասարդական պալատի հեղինակ Հրաչիկ Պողոսյանն ահազանգում է, որ այն քանդվել է ապօրինաբար: Նախարարը չէր արձագանքում իր պաշտոնավարման ընթացքում քանդվող կառույցների վերաբերյալ հանրության, մասնագետների կոչերին, ուր մնաց` Երիտասարդական պալատի մասին մտահոգվեր:

      Մեկ այլ կառույց՝ Արամի 30-ում գտնվող. Երևանի պատմության մի մասնիկը դարձած երկհարկանի շինությունը քանդելու ժամանակ, երբ Պողոսյանին հարցրինք՝ ինքն է՞լ է կարծում, որ անհրաժեշտ է քանդել այն, նա շտապեց պատասխանել, թե դա հուշարձան շենք չէ: «Հետևաբար, ես՝ որպես մշակույթի նախարար, դրա պատասխանը չեմ կարող տալ»,- ասաց նա։

      Իսկ Աֆրիկյանների տունը հուշարձան շենք էր, որի ապամոնտաժման ժամանակ նախարարը շտապեց հիշեցնել՝ ապամոնտաժելու որոշումը կայացվել է 2004-ին, երբ ինքը նախարար չի եղել, և այդ պատճառով էլ նա կարծիք չուներ շենքի ապամոնտաժման վերաբերյալ։

      Մեկ այլ օրինակ՝ ամիսներ առաջ պարզ դարձավ, որ Երևանի Արամի 9 հասցեում գտնվող ճարտարապետական և պատմական մեծ նշանակություն ունեցող` Արամ Մանուկյանի տունը քանդում են՝ ստորգետնյա ավտոկայանատեղի կառուցելու համար։ Արամ Մանուկյանի տունը, ի դեպ, ներառված է Երևան քաղաքի պատմության եւ մշակույթի անշարժ հուշարձանների ցուցակում: Շենքի տանիքը, հատակն ու միջհարկային ծածկն արդեն քանդված են, մնացել է ճակատը: Այս մասին լրատվամիջոցները գրեցին, ընթերցողները քննարկեցին, ճարտարապետներն իրենց ցավը հայտնեցին, և վերջ։

      Հասմիկ Պողոսյանի հարցազրույցները թերթելիս աչքովս հետաքրքիր մի բան ընկավ. նախարարը նշել էր, որ միշտ ցանկացել է մշակութային լրագրող դառնալ: Եթե նրա ցանկության մասին 10 տարի առաջ իմանայինք, ազգովի ամեն ինչ կանեինք՝ այն իրականություն դարձնելու համար, գոնե մշակութային ինչ-ինչ արժեքներ կփրկեինք։ Թե չէ` տպավորություն է ստեղծվում, թե Հասմիկ Պողոսյանն այնպես էր արել, որ զբոսաշրջիկները Հայաստան գան` միայն իրեն տեսնելու:

      Բայց` ոչ, անաչառ լինելու համար ասենք, որ Պողոսյանն այնպես չէ, որ ընդհանրապես գործ չի արել` Կապանի Հալիձորի բերդից քիչ ներքև նորոգվել է զուգարանը, ինչի համար ծախսվել է մի ողջ կարողություն` 8 միլիոն դրամ:

      Կարինե Հարությունյան

    7. #22
      Registered User
      Join Date
      May 2009
      Posts
      2,967

      Re: Preservation, conservation of monuments.



      .
      Politics is not about the pursuit of morality nor what's right or wrong
      Its about self interest at personal and national level often at odds with the above.
      Great politicians pursue the National interest and small politicians personal interests

    Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

    Thread Information

    Users Browsing this Thread

    There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

    Similar Threads

    1. Armenian Monuments in Rhode Island
      By crusader1492 in forum Genocide Events & Memorials of North America
      Replies: 0
      Last Post: 01-07-2009, 12:17 PM
    2. Replies: 4
      Last Post: 01-29-2006, 02:52 AM
    3. I was truly afraid for Preservation Hall.
      By Stark Evade in forum Music
      Replies: 1
      Last Post: 09-26-2005, 02:39 PM
    4. Western Armenia - Turkish Destruction of Armenian Monuments
      By Tongue in forum Genocide Discussions
      Replies: 15
      Last Post: 09-07-2005, 08:22 AM
    5. Armenian Studies And Preservation Of National Values
      By Siamanto in forum General Armenian Talk
      Replies: 2
      Last Post: 07-18-2005, 11:37 PM

    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •