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Syrian Armenian

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  • #41
    Re: Syrian Armenian

    Let's take this information with a big chunk of precaution, until more reliable info.

    1- Turk Tatars are not known for their readiness to die for other's cause. It's quite the opposite, when war looms at their door, they tend to pay or lure others, to die for them... (Russians, Turks, Kurds, Chechens, Afghans, Ukrainians, Belorussians, North Caucasians, Arabs... Talysh, Udis, Lezkis, etc...). They even rarely volunteered to die in Northern Caucasus, for much more related Chechen, Dagestani, etc... causes.
    2- Turks generally denigrate Arabs, and I would be very surprised to see such eagerness among non hired tatars to go and die in an Arabic country, with language, cultural barriers much bigger, than for Chechnya... (unless they are enrolled, and paid by their state, as is the case for turkish special forces...).
    3- It is highly likely, Arabs, in their turn ignorant of ex-soviet realities, may label a group of Northern Caucasians, as Azerbaijanis, by ignorance, or lurred by fake documents, the guys may have used to transit from Russia's Kavkaz to Syria.
    4- The loss of 30 guys at once, all of a sudden, is a very big number, for such a small contingent (rare reports of any presence of tatar turks in media's, contrary to other ethnicities, first of all Turks...), unless imagining a scenario of a trap, as it was the case, for an unexperimented lebanese sunni brigade from Tripoli, a couple of months ago, trapped and liquidated at once by Syrian units just after entering Homs province. This case of unexperimented, 'romantic' small detachment eliminated at once put aside, we must assume a much bigger contingent of at least 300 loosing 10% in a short period of time..
    5- There is no big sunni azeri districts, able to sent 300 volunteers overseas, on pure 'ideological' bases in Azarbaijan. Such a contingent would need big population of several hundred thousands of sunnis...
    6- Most sunnis of Azerbaijan are national minorities, like the Lezgin, etc...
    7- The main logic of this, might be the undercover mission of semi-regular, or special forces, sent by Aliyev Khan, to acquire combat experience. Still not very convincing...

    Let's wait and see more details, before buying this story...



    Originally posted by Vrej1915 View Post
    http://voskanapat.info/?p=1420

    PHOTOS OF 30???

    _____

    Սիրիայում մոտ 30 ադրբեջանցի զինյալ է ոչնչացվել

    http://news.am/arm/news/147135.html

    Ապրիլ 02, 2013 | 22:35
    Ադրբեջանցիները շարունակում են կռվել Սիրիայի զինյալների շարքերում: Արդեն հրապարակվել է Սիրիայում սպանված մոջահեդ-ադրբեջանցիների մոտավոր թիվը եւ նրանց լուսանկարը:

    Ինչպես հաղորդում է APA-ն՝ վկայակոչելով մոջահեդ-թուրքերի կայքը, մինչ օրս Սիրիայում մոտ 30 ադրբեջանցի զինյալ է սպանվել: Սիրիայում սպանված ադրբեջանցիների անունները չեն նշվում, բայց կայքերում տեղադրվել է նրանցից մի քանիսի լուսանկարները:

    Ավելի վաղ Սիրիայի պետական լրատվամիջոցները հայտնել էին մեկ սպանված ադրբեջանցու մասին: 2012-ի հոկտեմբերի 19-ին Հալեպի նահանգի Ալ-Աթարեբ եւ Աս-Սաֆիրա շրջաններում զինված ընդհարում էր տեղի ունեցել կառավարական զորքերի եւ ընդդիմադիր զինյալների միջեւ, որի ժամանակ սպանվել էր նաեւ Ադրբեջանի քաղաքացի Հասին Քազլին:

    Comment


    • #42
      Re: Syrian Armenian

      YEREVAN. – The Azerbaijani society is facing serious problems and experiencing a deep crisis, Arab Studies specialist Sargis Grigoryan said during a press conference on Thursday, reflecting on the death of thirty Azerbaijani militias in Syria.

      “Primarily the youth of the Azerbaijani society respond to the calls for an Islamic war at the battlefronts. The death of the thirty Azerbaijanis also speaks to the fact that the number of Azerbaijanis that have gotten involved in the Syrian crisis reaches hundreds,” Grigoryan stressed.

      In his words, unlike the Western countries, which state about fighting against the Islamists that return from Syria, the Azerbaijani authorities do not stand out with such steps.

      “I believe this comes to prove that this refers to conducting a designed policy. The Azerbaijani guerrillas acquire know-how, by taking part in military operations at Islamic fronts, [and] upon returning to the homeland, their know-how could be used in other directions,” the Arab Studies specialist noted, and added that the Azerbaijanis are fighting wars also in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iraq, Mali, and in several other countries.

      Sargis Grigoryan expressed a conviction that all this is worrisome because Azerbaijan is Armenia’s neighbor.
      http://news.am/eng/news/147432.html

      Comment


      • #43
        Re: Syrian Armenian

        The Syrian army in street fights with armor. You can see in this video a tank taking multi RPG hits and still fighting.

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9HmmN17LNOM

        Comment


        • #44
          Re: Syrian Armenian

          INCREASE IN NUMBER OF AZERBAIJANI MILITIAS IN SYRIA IS WORRISOME - ARMENIAN EXPERT

          April 04, 2013 | 16:10

          YEREVAN. - The Azerbaijani society is facing serious problems and
          experiencing a deep crisis, Arab Studies specialist Sargis Grigoryan
          said during a press conference on Thursday, reflecting on the death
          of thirty Azerbaijani militias in Syria.

          "Primarily the youth of the Azerbaijani society respond to the calls
          for an Islamic war at the battlefronts. The death of the thirty
          Azerbaijanis also speaks to the fact that the number of Azerbaijanis
          that have gotten involved in the Syrian crisis reaches hundreds,"
          Grigoryan stressed.

          In his words, unlike the Western countries, which state about
          fighting against the Islamists that return from Syria, the Azerbaijani
          authorities do not stand out with such steps.

          "I believe this comes to prove that this refers to conducting
          a designed policy. The Azerbaijani guerrillas acquire know-how, by
          taking part in military operations at Islamic fronts, [and] upon
          returning to the homeland, their know-how could be used in other
          directions," the Arab Studies specialist noted, and added that the
          Azerbaijanis are fighting wars also in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iraq,
          Mali, and in several other countries.

          Sargis Grigoryan expressed a conviction that all this is worrisome
          because Azerbaijan is Armenia's neighbor.

          News from Armenia - NEWS.am

          Comment


          • #45
            Re: Syrian Armenian

            PARTIALLY RESTORED ALEPPO ELECTRICITY THE ONLY POSITIVE CHANGE DURING LAST FEW DAYS

            18:18, 5 April, 2013

            YEREVAN, APRIL 5, ARMENPRESS: Issues connected with electricity are
            gradually resolving in Aleppo. This was noted by Press Secretary of
            the Armenian National Prelacy Jirair Reisian in the interview with
            Armenpress, underlining that even those little positive changes assured
            the high spirit of residents. Issues on water have also been resolved.

            Referring to Sheikh Maksoud district it is necessary to note that it
            remains to be the target of clashes. Bullets are spreading fear in the
            neighboring district, with a lot of Armenians living there. Residents
            avoid going out from their apartments in order to be safe.

            In accordance with the UN data, 70 thousand people were killed during
            23 months ongoing clashes in Syria. Over 1 million citizens have
            become refugees.

            Comment


            • #46
              Re: Syrian Armenian



              If this is going to get out of control then let it! The toorks sitting back enjoying the show! I hope the Kurds wake up, they are next on the menu!

              Comment


              • #47
                Re: Syrian Armenian

                Armenian-born soldier killed in Syria

                March 17, 2013 - 19:40 AMT

                PanARMENIAN.Net - An Armenian-born soldier of the Syrian army was
                killed in clashes with the rebels in Damascus.
                As Aleppo Armenians group said in a post on Facebook, Vazgen Isahak
                Taghlian was killed on March 15 during a battle in one of Damascus
                suburbs. The funeral took place in Surp Sarkis Cathedral on March 17.

                Comment


                • #48
                  Re: Syrian Armenian

                  ++ Rest In Peace ++
                  B0zkurt Hunter

                  Comment


                  • #49
                    Re: Syrian Armenian

                    ABDUCTED BY BANDITS AND FORGOTTEN BY THE WORLD: THE STORY OF FR MICHAEL KAYAL

                    Aleteia
                    April 16 2013

                    Carly Andrews

                    Kidnapped, lost and forgotten: On the 9th of February 2013,
                    27-year-old Father Michael Kayal from Aleppo, Syria, was abducted
                    by Islamic extremist rebels. Two months later he is still missing,
                    yet the world remains silent.

                    Monsignor Georges Dankaye, Rector of the Armenian College, Rome, and
                    Procurator of the Armenian Catholic Church under the Holy See, reveals
                    to us the facts about the kidnapping of Fr. Michael and about the
                    terrible reality in which Syrian Christians are living. This reality
                    is one of bloodshed, torture and inhumanity at an unthinkable level.

                    "Fr. Michael was my student in seminary for two years in Aleppo. He
                    was very kind and intelligent," recounts Dankaye, smiling sorrowfully.

                    "He loved sport and music, and to sing, especially liturgical songs.

                    He was always ready to help."

                    The two were also over a year together in the Armenian College in Rome,
                    where Michael studied Canon Law at the Pontifical Oriental Institute,
                    after which he was ordained a priest on the 2nd of November 2011.

                    By the time Fr. Michael returned to Syria, the uprising had already
                    begun and violence swept through the land, making every movement one
                    of uncertainty for the young priest. But his "spirit, enthusiasm and
                    zeal" captured the hearts of both his parish priest and parishioners.

                    As the situation worsened, and refugees flooded in from the peripheries
                    of Aleppo, Fr. Michael along with three other young priests started
                    up a mission with the migrants. "They went every day to the schools
                    where the Muslim families were taking refuge and took them food to
                    eat, providing both lunch and dinner, and then they brought other aid,
                    and doctors as well."

                    It seems that Fr. Michael was walking in the steps of the saints -
                    a man of servitude and compassion: "I remember one of his phone calls
                    to me; he said, 'what I can always do is serve, and nothing can be
                    greater than this," recalls Dankaye.

                    On the 9th of February, Fr. Michael set out from Aleppo. He was
                    scheduled to visit Rome, stopping first in a small city on the way to
                    Beirut before arriving in Italy on the 12th of February. He had not
                    long been travelling when at one of the many blockades that plague
                    the Syrian roads a band of rebels stormed the bus. "There were three
                    priests aboard, two in clerics and one Salesian dressed in plain
                    clothes. They saw the two priests dressed in clerics and made them
                    get down; to the third they said nothing."

                    "Half an hour later they had phoned his brother, saying, 'we'll be in
                    contact soon to come to an agreement.'" Dankaye continues, "From that
                    moment on the only contact was with his brother, never with the Church
                    itself; then his brother spoke to the bishop ... and it seems that the
                    bishop informed the government." Fr. Michael's family revealed that
                    they made a request for one million Syrian lire and for the liberation
                    of 15 prisoners. However, after having asked the group which prisoners
                    they wanted releasing, the terrorists renounced the request, asking
                    only for the money. "This makes us think that it is a small armed group
                    rather than the Syrian Liberation Front ... because the liberation of
                    15 prisoners would be considered as a good offer." He explains that
                    "there are about 2000 of these little groups. They don't organise or
                    coordinate among one another; each group has their own objectives,
                    their own ideals." Their disorganisation became apparent when, after
                    the family had agreed to pay the ransom, the group made no further
                    attempt at claiming the ransom money.

                    So what is the situation now for Fr. Michael? Is he still alive?

                    Dankaye states that "the only information we have is from one phone
                    call on the 20th of February; they let him talk to his mother for less
                    than half a minute, where he said, 'Mum, I'm OK, but pray for me.'
                    Then from that date on, there has been no more contact. We don't know
                    anything. It remains a mystery."

                    In reference to what the Church is doing to resolve the issue, sadly
                    Dankaye tells us that for now, "they cannot do anything for Fr.

                    Michael without any contact from him or his kidnappers." Indeed,
                    silence cannot be negotiated with. So where does this leave the young
                    priest? The harsh reality of the situation is that the future of Fr.

                    Michael does not appear to be hopeful.

                    Are we witnessing, then, a blatant and merciless persecution of the
                    Christian Church in Syria? The answer, of course, is yes. But the
                    situation is complex; Dankaye explains that "at the beginning of the
                    uprising, the opposition said they wanted to preserve the Christian
                    community. They said, 'don't be afraid to go against this system;
                    we will treat you well,' but obviously, they didn't get the positive
                    reply that they were expecting." According to Dankaye, the opposition
                    expected the Christian community to take arms and join their rebellion,
                    "but this Christian community in Syria are not a community that knows
                    how to use arms or enter into war," he exclaims. "They are normal
                    citizens that love their country, and so it's difficult for them
                    to take up arms against anyone ... So they weren't involved in the
                    manifestations nor in the bearing of arms, and this angered them."

                    The result now is that they are not offering any security to the
                    Christian community, "they no longer say 'we'll treat you well,'"
                    Dankaye states, as he echo's the voice of the opposition. "They say,
                    'we'll take vengeance on you. You Christians didn't enter into the
                    war, you didn't join the opposition, and now you have to pay for it;
                    this is your choice." This is an attack of revenge rather than a
                    specifically religious persecution. Dankaye does, however, refer to
                    other groups such as the "Jihadists and Nasrats, where we can clearly
                    talk of religious persecution." He also mentions the Alawites, and
                    says "that a good part of the Sunnis are also pro-government and they
                    commit massacres."

                    When asked if he saw a way towards peace, Dankaye answered with the
                    heartbreaking reply: "Tragically, I don't see it." He refers to the
                    "political pride" of the regimes, which "won't let it ever go back,"
                    and "even if they wanted to stop it now, they couldn't, because the
                    initiative is no longer in their hands." He continues, "Unfortunately,
                    I have to say that the very worst that exists in man has been awoken,
                    and now it's out of control, and no one can stop it."

                    At these piercing words, the soul shudders to think of the fate of the
                    Armenian Catholics in Syria. "The Christian community doesn't have any
                    way out; it's surrounded," exclaims Dankaye, "it is preparing itself
                    for martyrdom ... we don't want it, we don't hope for it; we fear it,
                    but that's how it is." He remembers the haunting words of his father
                    two weeks earlier: "He told me, 'if you hear of our deaths, do not
                    come to our funeral; we would not take you with us.'"

                    Dankaye also shares a message that he received from a friend a few days
                    ago, which epitomises the shocking gravity of the situation for Syrian
                    Christians: "The wolf kills those pups that can't manage by themselves
                    so that they are not eaten alive by the rats and ants. It's an act of
                    mercy. Don't judge my words too harshly. Talk with your parents. It's
                    so that those animals don't get to them first." When parents are
                    driven to thoughts of ending the lives of their children, one can only
                    imagine the atrocities that await them a few paces outside their doors.

                    To the final question as to what Christians round the world could do,
                    his reply was: pray. "Remain always in prayer. It is also a moment that
                    our Lord lived in Gethsemane. There is the temptation to escape, or to
                    cry out to the Lord, 'save us!' But then, if it is his will, we have
                    to be ready, as the martyrs were, to face death in faithfulness ...

                    it is thus in prayer that we remain welded in faith and strong in
                    hope, and moreover, until the last moment, we remain in love, even
                    in the face of those who know not what they do."

                    We thus call out to all Christians of the world: Pray for Fr.

                    Michael; pray for Syria, a bloodstained land ravaged by an inexorable
                    surge of evil; pray for the tortured and mutilated men, the violated
                    women and girls, the persecuted Christians; pray for the lost ones
                    committing these unthinkable atrocities, and most of all pray that
                    the world rouses from its silence, and runs to the aid of its brothers
                    and sisters.

                    Lastly we cry out a desperate appeal to the humanity of Fr. Michael's
                    kidnappers: Let him home. Please, let Fr. Michael Kayal home.

                    http://www.aleteia.org/en/world/news...e-world-967001

                    Comment


                    • #50
                      Re: Syrian Armenian

                      Gunmen abduct two bishops in northern Syria
                      BBC

                      Militants in a rebel-held area of northern Syria have abducted two bishops travelling from the Turkish border back to the city of Aleppo.

                      The kidnapping was reported by Syrian state media and confirmed by a member of the official opposition leadership.

                      Yohanna Ibrahim is head of the Syriac Orthodox Church in Aleppo and Boulos Yaziji leads the Greek Orthodox Church in the city.

                      They are the most senior Christian clerics caught up directly in the war.

                      It was not immediately clear who had kidnapped them.

                      Christians made up about 10% of the mainly Sunni Muslim country's population before the uprising against President Bashar al-Assad began just over two years ago.

                      According to the UN, at least 70,000 people have been killed overall in the civil war and more than one million are now living as refugees in neighbouring countries.

                      'Driver killed'
                      State TV announced that an "armed terrorist group" had kidnapped the two bishops as they carried out "humanitarian work in Aleppo countryside".

                      Abdulahad Steifo, a Syriac member of the opposition Syrian National Coalition, said the men had been kidnapped on the road to Aleppo from the rebel-held Bab al-Hawa crossing, which is close to the Turkish town of Reyhanli.

                      Asked who was behind their abduction, he said: "All probabilities are open."

                      Christian residents of Aleppo, speaking on on condition of anonymity. told AFP news agency gunmen had killed the bishops' driver.

                      In September, Bishop Ibrahim told Reuters news agency hundreds of Christian families had fled Aleppo as rebels and soldiers battled for control of the country's biggest city.

                      "In its modern history Aleppo has not seen such critical and painful times," he said.

                      "Christians have been attacked and kidnapped in monstrous ways and their relatives have paid big sums for their release," the bishop added.

                      Comment

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