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Armenia doesn't recognize Artsakh Independence

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  • Armenia doesn't recognize Artsakh Independence

    Why aren't more Armenian organizations asking for this? It really frustrates me that Artsakh get's no respect from Armenia's politicians. It seems the only ones who really care are the ones that have ties to the Diaspora (Hunchag, Tashnag, Heritage parties).

    I don't want any problem with the Turkish superpower but I have hopes of liberating Nakhitchevan some day for Diasporan Armenians (in LA, Beirut, Iran, ect)...this seems hopeless in the face of our current deli ma regarding Artsakhs legitimacy.
    kurtçul kangal

  • #2
    Re: Armenia doesn't recognize Artsakh Independence

    My judo coach who is Armenian, told me that in the
    war Armenians where near Meghri and were around 7km
    to closing off the route from Nakhitchevan to Baku, but
    the Russians stopped it, becuase the situation would
    get far out of line.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Armenia doesn't recognize Artsakh Independence

      the reason i think Armenia doesnt accept Artsakh's independence is because we dont want to be known as the aggressor. Right now azerbaijan is the aggressor because they began with the ethnic cleansing and we retaliated. If we accept the independence then we will break the ceasefire, azerbaijan will xxxxx and probably attack. Also i think Armenia doesnt want to be the first country to accept Artsakh's independence. If another country accepts it i guarantee Armenia will be the next country to accept it.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Armenia doesn't recognize Artsakh Independence

        Originally posted by Icy View Post
        My judo coach who is Armenian, told me that in the
        war Armenians where near Meghri and were around 7km
        to closing off the route from Nakhitchevan to Baku, but
        the Russians stopped it, becuase the situation would
        get far out of line.
        Nakhitchevan's security is guaranteed by Turkey. Thats why Armenia did not attack to that region. It would give Turkey a legal right to interfere.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Armenia doesn't recognize Artsakh Independence

          The simple reason is that Armenia relies on depicting the NKR as a state that came into being of its own accord and without interference from Armenia. In this manner the NKR's current existence can thus be justified as a result of self-determination. As ninetoyadome put it, it depicts the Azeris as the aggressors and the Armenian population of Karabagh as a group acting in self defence. This position is easier to justify and hold in the international political arena.

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          • #6
            Re: Armenia doesn't recognize Artsakh Independence

            Originally posted by MrT View Post
            The simple reason is that Armenia relies on depicting the NKR as a state that came into being of its own accord and without interference from Armenia. In this manner the NKR's current existence can thus be justified as a result of self-determination. As ninetoyadome put it, it depicts the Azeris as the aggressors and the Armenian population of Karabagh as a group acting in self defence. This position is easier to justify and hold in the international political arena.
            True and also while few there are still Azeri's there so it gives the territory as much right (at least in international eyes) to be independent as Kosovo with some nations not disagreeing with its right to independence (Armenia, Greece, Russia and so forth) and others entirely rejecting it (Turkey, Azerbaijan).

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            • #7
              Re: Armenia doesn't recognize Artsakh Independence

              I don't think some of you understand the word "independence". It would be a completely separate state, and with higher regard internationally if recognized as such.

              Icy, you're right, the Artsakh Army was about to take two significant positions to the North and East but Russia stopped them, preventing Artsakh from suing for peace (that would not be in Russia's interest).

              In the meantime, South Ossetia and Abkhazia are not recognized by a few nations...I'm glad Armenia wasn't among them, since Russia resists doing anything that might offend the psuedo-Kuwaiti monarchs.
              kurtçul kangal

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              • #8
                Re: Armenia doesn't recognize Artsakh Independence

                It's been many years since 1993. The political climate is changing. Azeris are getting the best weapson that money can buy from the US, Turkey, Israel and Russia. Since its been so long, and the stalemate has went nowhere, and since Artsakh has rebuilt itself and is truly standing on its own feet, it should be recognized by Armenia. Any political party that doesn't support it should be questioned for its loyalty as far as I'm concerned.

                Artsakh has already declared itself independent, after all. Armenia would only recognize what has already been established.

                http://www.karabakh.net/engl/gov?id=78
                kurtçul kangal

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Armenia doesn't recognize Artsakh Independence

                  Arguing over Karabakh: Heritage calls for recognition, Republicans say move mistimed


                  An opposition party in parliament has embarked on its second attempt in as many years to get the recognition of Nagorno-Karabakh by Armenia on the agenda of lawmakers in Yerevan.

                  The parliament’s minority faction of ex-foreign minister Raffi Hovannisian’s Heritage party has submitted to the National Assembly a draft law “On the Recognition of the Nagorno-Karabakh Republic” which, the party’s parliamentary leader says, is aimed at preventing “upcoming undesirable developments.”

                  Stepan Safaryan describes the protocols on normalizing relations signed last week by Armenia and Turkey as a prelude to conciliatory steps in the resolution of the long-running Armenian-Azerbaijani conflict over Nagorno-Karabakh.

                  “Heritage today has two top objectives – to prevent the ratification of the notorious [Armenia-Turkey] protocols and, by this proposed legislation, stop Armenian authorities from signing any document that would go against the interests of the Karabakh Republic,” Safaryan tells ArmeniaNow.

                  According to the opposition parliamentarian, the signing of the Armenian-Turkish protocols in Zurich, Switzerland, on October 10 will be followed by certain “not pro-Armenian” actions in the Nagorno-Karabakh settlement. “The recognition of Karabakh by parliament will make it possible to prevent this process,” argues Safaryan.

                  Heritage leader Raffi Hovannisian initiated a similar draft law in 2007. But in April 2008, the parliament voted 64 to 15 to prevent that bill from being put on the agenda of discussions.

                  Heritage lawmakers today hope the parliamentary majority “has learned some lessons” since last year and that they won’t block the bill from making it to the floor this time around.

                  “If it is being said that Karabakh will have no relation to the course of the development of Armenian-Turkish relations, then the best way to dispel these suspicions is to pass a law and recognize Karabakh’s independence,” Heritage MP Larisa Alaverdyan tells ArmeniaNow.

                  The main argument of critics of such a piece of legislation is that this step will harm the ongoing internationally mediated negotiations with Azerbaijan.

                  Secretary of the ruling Republican Party’s faction in parliament Eduard Sharmazanov says that negotiations are in progress and “any other interference may harm the Minsk Group process.”

                  “We have always said that recognition is the last bullet that will be used, failing all other means,” Sharmazanov tells ArmeniaNow.

                  After the failure of the bill to reach the parliament floor last year, President Serzh Sargsyan also said that Armenia does not recognize Nagorno-Karabakh’s independence because it is in a process of negotiations.

                  “Do you remember that in the case with Kosovo and other cases it was said that recognition is the last resort? If there is no other means, then Armenia will recognize Nagorno-Karabakh’s independence,” the president said on September 20, 2008 during a meeting with foreign media.

                  Meanwhile, in March 2008, President Robert Kocharyan also spoke about the need for Armenia to recognize Nagorno-Karabakh.

                  The ex-president made that statement after the UN General Assembly adopted, on March 14, a resolution dealing with “the state of occupied territories of Azerbaijan” and internationally reaffirmed Azerbaijan’s territorial integrity.

                  Kocharyan then said in Karabakh that in the event of such developments Armenia could recognize the independence of Karabakh or sign a military agreement with Stepanakert on ensuring the latter’s security.

                  That statement drew a stormy reaction from Baku and an opinion from Zeyno Baran, former U.S. top Karabakh negotiator Matthew Bryza’s Turkish-American wife who heads Hudson Institute’s Center for Eurasian Policy.

                  In one interview given to an Azerbaijani website, Day.az, Baran then said:

                  “Even if Armenia makes that decision, no one will recognize Nagorno-Karabakh, no one will second this decision, including the Minsk Group and its member Russia, which is an ally of Armenia in many issues. That’s why I don’t treat seriously statements like these made by the Armenian leadership.”

                  And Baku reacts to every mention by Armenia of a possible recognition of Karabakh with threats to renew hostilities.

                  “If Armenia recognizes Karabakh’s independence, it could lead to the resumption of military operations,” Azerbaijan’s President Ilham Aliev said in April 2008.

                  One expert from a Yerevan-based think-tank, however, downplays the impact of such a move by Armenia on the negotiating process.

                  “Azerbaijan’s threats show that in reality the Azerbaijani side is not ready for concessions and issues these war threats only to prevent developments that would be unfavorable for it,” says Mitk analytical center expert Edgar Helhelyan.

                  The analyst finds it essential to restore Karabakh’s right to be present at the negotiating table as a full party.

                  “And the start of this process will be Armenia’s recognition of the Nagorno-Karabakh Republic,” he concludes.

                  http://armenianow.com/?action=viewAr...D=1257&lng=eng
                  Azerbaboon: 9.000 Google hits and counting!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Armenia doesn't recognize Artsakh Independence

                    Thanks Federate for the above info. I hope and think that it is about time that Armenia recognizes Nagorno-Karabakh/Artsakh's recognition. I think that this is the time for last resort of things.
                    Հա'յ ժողովուրդ, քո միա'կ բրկութիւնը քո հաւաքական ուժի մէջ է:

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