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What is it like...

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  • Catharsis
    replied
    Re: What is it like...

    Originally posted by Armanen View Post
    You will have a great time Julia jan. Just be sure to check out all the places Catharsis suggested. It is important to visit all the provinces of Armenia, including Artsakh and get familiar with the people, the history, and the nature.

    Armenians are very warm blooded people so if they see that in you then your whole trip will become easier and more enjoyable.
    I would also add a visit to the tomb-monastery of the great fifth century St. Mesrop Mashtots in Oshakan who revived the use of the Armenian alphabet (and thus saved Armenian cultural identity from being forever diluted) and the remnants of the fourth century royal tombs of Arsacids in Aghts. But I realize that one trip is not enough for all of this. But one should know and perhaps plan ahead for later visits and even possibly longer stays.

    Leave a comment:


  • Stark Evade
    replied
    Re: What is it like...

    Originally posted by Julia View Post
    ...in Armenia?

    A small introduction about me: I'm only 1/4 Armenian, but I'm learning the language and plan to earn my PhD in Ancient Armenian history. I don't know why I'm so interested in Armenia, however. I came here to learn all I can.

    To answer the question, what is it like in Armenia:

    Armenia is a country with a strong religious identity which often doesn't interfere with a respect for science and technology. It's a country with people who are naturally poetic and artistic but who's isolation from the world by being land-locked and surrounded by unfriendly countries has stunted the growth of their artistic potential as well as social and political understanding. It hasn't fully recovered from communism -- there is plenty of corruption and thievery -- but given that it's only been 20 years, it's grown more than any other soviet country. There is a complacency and a feeling of powerlessness among the people regarding their situation and yet, simultaneously, a drive to move on is very apparent. The people recognize that there is more out there but don't quite know what to do with it. It's a country that has a lot of natural beauty and also constant reminders of a lack of a middle-class. There are lots of contradictions and paradoxes. Lots of strange juxtapositions. It's a complicated place with enough sadness for anyone. But hope and great potential abound.

    Leave a comment:


  • Haykakan
    replied
    Re: What is it like...

    That is very true. I have found such cool things off the beaten path. I found a bunch of prehistoric stone cutting tools chiped out of onyx near Ara Ler. Some very interesting cave formations and many other things. Armenia is so old and rich in history that every inch of it has a story behind it. I would love to explore the lori region and zangezur next, maybe a few days at each location.

    Leave a comment:


  • Stark Evade
    replied
    Re: What is it like...

    Originally posted by Julia View Post
    Okay, thanks everyone for your input.
    Carahunge (the Armenian Stonehenge), though, admittedly, it's in the middle of nowhere. But so many great things in Armenia are in the middle of nowhere.

    Leave a comment:


  • Armanen
    replied
    Re: What is it like...

    You will have a great time Julia jan. Just be sure to check out all the places Catharsis suggested. It is important to visit all the provinces of Armenia, including Artsakh and get familiar with the people, the history, and the nature.

    Armenians are very warm blooded people so if they see that in you then your whole trip will become easier and more enjoyable.

    Leave a comment:


  • Julia
    replied
    Re: What is it like...

    Originally posted by Mos View Post
    Armenian Church is integral to Armenian identity. It is because Armenian church armenians have been able to keep identity, culture, language through all foreign oppression . Hopefully, you'll convert to Armenian Orthodox later in your life, we have very beautiful service and we were first nation to adopt Christianity..
    I personally know some Mormon Armenians.. So I think I'm okay.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mos
    replied
    Re: What is it like...

    Originally posted by Julia View Post
    I'm certainly religious, I just don't know if I could join the Armenian Apostolic Church because of my religion right now...

    I already do listen to Armenian music. My mom's friend Harout gives us a bunch.
    Armenian Church is integral to Armenian identity. It is because Armenian church armenians have been able to keep identity, culture, language through all foreign oppression . Hopefully, you'll convert to Armenian Orthodox later in your life, we have very beautiful service and we were first nation to adopt Christianity..

    Leave a comment:


  • Julia
    replied
    Re: What is it like...

    Originally posted by Mos View Post
    Make sure to be part of Armenian Church and if you haven't already be baptized into Armenian Orthodox Church (I was baptized in Armenia when 1 years old). And also importantly, knowledge of Armenian language is obviously key (eastern armenian).

    And listen to Armenian music!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=chw8sAKOM5k

    -Aram Asatryan, he passed away few years ago, he is very well known Armenian singer and great voice he has
    I'm certainly religious, I just don't know if I could join the Armenian Apostolic Church because of my religion right now...

    I already do listen to Armenian music. My mom's friend Harout gives us a bunch.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mos
    replied
    Re: What is it like...

    Make sure to be part of Armenian Church and if you haven't already be baptized into Armenian Orthodox Church (I was baptized in Armenia when 1 years old). And also importantly, knowledge of Armenian language is obviously key (eastern armenian).

    And listen to Armenian music!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=chw8sAKOM5k

    -Aram Asatryan, he passed away few years ago, he is very well known Armenian singer and great voice he has

    Leave a comment:


  • Julia
    replied
    Re: What is it like...

    Originally posted by Mos View Post
    You would have to get used to Soviet mentality, heavy corruption everywhere. It will take a while to get used to after US but things are chaning for better and Yerevan is becoming more and more modern so it is good time now and improvement is a lot. I'm going to move back to Armenia after my studies, all my relatives are there and going back and forth every year to Armenia just makes me miss Armenia more. Once you look at Armenian mountains and valleys you will think there is no place more beautiful...

    Nice videos on life in Yerevan:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3o6izWV7RFo (great song!)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ufPOsBKrc1Q
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=29Q6ILy2b50
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cShZ4vQZsfQ
    I agree, that is a good song. Thanks for the videos.

    Leave a comment:

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