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Can Turkey Learn Tolerance?

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  • Part 3

    Western governments are pushing for independence for a group of Jihadist thugs who recently wanted to create the Osama bin Laden mosque in Kosovo. This name was eventually changed for public relations reasons since the Albanians knew they needed American political support. In June 2007 the visiting US President George W. Bush was hailed as a hero by a group of Albanians, who also apparently stole his watch. "Sooner rather than later you've got to say 'Enough's enough — Kosovo is independent,'" Bush told cheering Albanians. As German newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung later commented, "Why should the Albanians settle for autonomy when George W. Bush had already promised them their own state?"

    President Bush declared a "war on terror" after the Jihadist attacks on the United States in 2001. Six years later, all he has achieved is bleeding American tax payers financially and American soldiers literally while overseeing the eradication of non-Muslim communities in Iraq. Now his administration supports independence for terrorist-sponsoring Muslims in the Balkans and in the Palestinian territories. Unless he does something very substantial in 2008, George W. Bush risks being remembered as one of the worst presidents in American history.

    I listened to a speech by Patrick Sookhdeo, a former Muslim who recently launched his latest book, Global Jihad: The Future in the Face of Militant Islam. Sookhdeo had done a lot of excellent – and frightening – research regarding the Islamization of Western Europe, especially Britain. He recalled having a conversation with a senior Western official regarding what would happen if Muslims in a region of, say, Britain or the Netherlands, should declare that they would no longer accept the laws of the central government and would form a breakaway Islamic Republic. This official then stated that they would probably just have to quietly accept that. When witnessing the Muslim riots in France, which more and more resemble a civil war, this question is no longer just hypothetical.

    As writer Julia Gorin has warned, "An independent Kosovo will serve as a nod to secessionists worldwide," and "history will show what no one cares to understand: the current world war began officially in Yugoslavia."

    Granting Jihadist Muslims independence in Kosovo after they have conducted ethnic cleansing of non-Muslims will establish an extremely dangerous precedent. Not only is it immoral to sacrifice the freedom or perhaps existence of smaller nations, be that the Serbs or the Israelis, in order to save your own skin. As the example of Czechoslovakia demonstrated during WW2, it is also counterproductive. Supporting independence for Muslim Albanians in Kosovo will not lead to stabilization of the Balkans; it will rather lead to the Balkanization of the West. The new thug state will serve as a launching pad for Jihad activities against non-Muslims, just like an independent Palestinian state would do in the Middle East.

    In the case of Kosovo, the Russians are right and Western leaders, both in the European Union and the United States, are wrong. The Serbs have suffered enough. Give them a break!

    In a conflict between Muslims and non-Muslims, other infidels should always support the non-Muslim side. That goes for Kosovo as much as it goes for Kashmir or southern Thailand. It's time to end the demonization of the Serb people and support their struggle against the global Jihad. We are all next in line.

    Fjordman is a noted Norwegian blogger who has written for many conservative web sites.
    General Antranik (1865-1927): “I am not a nationalist. I recognize only one nation, the nation of the oppressed.”

    Comment


    • TURKISH PUBLISHER FACES JAIL OVER ARMENIA BOOK
      By Gareth Jones, Reuters

      Radio Liberty, Czech Rep.
      Dec 4 2007

      A Turkish publisher could receive a jail sentence on Wednesday of up
      to three years for insulting national identity under a law the European
      Union says unfairly restricts freedom of speech and wants scrapped.

      "Tomorrow's hearing may bring a final verdict in my trial, which
      began in 2005. The prosecutor wants the maximum penalty," publisher
      Ragip Zarakolu told Reuters on Tuesday.

      Prosecutors accuse Zarakolu of insulting "Turkishness" under
      article 301 of Turkey's penal code for publishing a Turkish language
      translation of a book by London-based author George Jerjian called "The
      Truth Will Set Us Free". The book urges reconciliation between Turks
      and Armenians and covers the mass killings of Armenians by Ottoman
      Turks during World War One, a highly sensitive issue for Turkey.

      Armenia, backed by many Western historians, says as many as 1.5 million
      of its people suffered systematic genocide at Turkish hands at that
      time. Turkey denies there was genocide and says many Muslim Turks as
      well as Christian Armenians were killed in inter-ethnic conflict as
      the Ottoman Empire collapsed under pressure of war.

      Affirming that the killings amounted to genocide is a criminal offence
      in Turkey. Nobel Literature Laureate Orhan Pamuk is among writers
      prosecuted for his comments on the events of 1915-16, though he was
      acquitted on a legal technicality.

      "I am against all forms of restriction on free expression... I did
      not even write this book, but Turkish people have a right to know
      what Armenians think," said Zarakolu, head of the Belge International
      Publishers.

      Zarakolu said he would appeal against any conviction. He has often
      been a target of Turkish prosecutors over the decades for his stance
      on freedom of expression and for publishing books the authorities
      have disapproved of.

      Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan's conservative government, under heavy
      EU pressure, is mulling ways of amending article 301, though analysts
      say the real problem lies not in the text but in the conservative
      mindset of many judges and prosecutors.

      "The government could have changed the law already. It is a very
      dangerous article. If accusations depict writers and journalists as
      traitors or enemies of Turkey, it is not so simple to be in front
      of Turkish public opinion," said Zarakolu. "It opens the door to
      our being lynched or killed by ultra-nationalist gangs," he said,
      citing the example of prominent Turkish Armenian editor Hrant Dink
      who was shot dead in Istanbul in January by an ultra-nationalist youth.

      Dink had been handed a suspended jail sentence under article 301 for
      his comments on the Armenian issue. Tens of thousands of people marched
      through Istanbul at his funeral to protest against ultra-nationalist
      violence.

      Members of the European Parliament visiting Turkey this week said
      article 301 was harming Turkey's bid to join the EU. "This latest case
      underlines that the Turkish government's promise to reform article
      301 cannot come too soon," Richard Howitt, a British Labor MEP,
      said in a statement.

      "Authors expressing peaceful views should never lead to imprisonment.

      The Turkish government has understood this and it is now for the
      Turkish parliament to pass, and for the Turkish courts to respect,"
      he said.
      General Antranik (1865-1927): “I am not a nationalist. I recognize only one nation, the nation of the oppressed.”

      Comment


      • turkey goons

        Daily Telegraph, London

        Inter Milan football strip 'offends Muslims'

        By Megan Levy
        Last Updated: 3:25pm GMT 12/12/2007

        A football strip worn by Italian team Inter Milan is at the centre of a legal row after a lawyer claimed it offended "Muslim sensibilities".

        Inter Milan jersey
        The 'offensive' Inter Milan strip

        Players wore the new strip – a white shirt with large red cross on it – in a Champions League match last month against Turkish team Fenerbahçe to celebrate the club’s centenary.

        But a Turkish lawyer, Baris Kaska, took exception to the "Crusader-style" cross which he said symbolised "Western racist superiority over Islam".

        He claimed the offending shirt reminded Turks of an emblem of the Christian order of the Knights Templar.

        Mr Kaska, who specialises in European law, has lodged a complaint in a local court against the club.

        He is seeking damages, and is appealing to Uefa to annul the match, which Inter Milan won 3-0.

        Mr Kaska told the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia: "That cross only brings one thing to mind - the symbol of the Templar Knights.

        "It made me think immediately of the bloody days of the past. While I was watching the game I felt profound grief in my soul."
        advertisement

        He said the court had contacted both Uefa and Fifa to convey his demand that Inter Milan should be "heavily fined for displaying an offensive symbol".

        Inter Milan officials are reportedly "astounded" at the controversy.

        They have pointed out that a red cross on a white background was the symbol of the city of Milan, and that many Italian football clubs have incorporated the cross on their shirts.

        Comment


        • Originally posted by steph View Post
          Daily Telegraph, London

          Inter Milan football strip 'offends Muslims'

          By Megan Levy
          Last Updated: 3:25pm GMT 12/12/2007

          A football strip worn by Italian team Inter Milan is at the centre of a legal row after a lawyer claimed it offended "Muslim sensibilities".

          Inter Milan jersey
          The 'offensive' Inter Milan strip

          Players wore the new strip – a white shirt with large red cross on it – in a Champions League match last month against Turkish team Fenerbahçe to celebrate the club’s centenary.

          But a Turkish lawyer, Baris Kaska, took exception to the "Crusader-style" cross which he said symbolised "Western racist superiority over Islam".

          He claimed the offending shirt reminded Turks of an emblem of the Christian order of the Knights Templar.

          Mr Kaska, who specialises in European law, has lodged a complaint in a local court against the club.

          He is seeking damages, and is appealing to Uefa to annul the match, which Inter Milan won 3-0.

          Mr Kaska told the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia: "That cross only brings one thing to mind - the symbol of the Templar Knights.

          "It made me think immediately of the bloody days of the past. While I was watching the game I felt profound grief in my soul."
          advertisement

          He said the court had contacted both Uefa and Fifa to convey his demand that Inter Milan should be "heavily fined for displaying an offensive symbol".

          Inter Milan officials are reportedly "astounded" at the controversy.

          They have pointed out that a red cross on a white background was the symbol of the city of Milan, and that many Italian football clubs have incorporated the cross on their shirts.
          hahahah, sore loser. I love these lines, "It made me think immediately of the bloody days of the past. While I was watching the game I felt profound grief in my soul." Talk about being melodramatic...my lord.
          General Antranik (1865-1927): “I am not a nationalist. I recognize only one nation, the nation of the oppressed.”

          Comment


          • Lets see now...when the Knights Templer last passed through those parts of Anatolia it was known as Byzantium...that was...er...a...before the Turks came rolling through "crusading" and sacking cities and such as it were...so who is it who should be offended at whom here? I suggest that some Italian Armenians sue the next Turkish soccer team that comes to town - I mean if the mere presence of someone dressed a certain way dredges up memories of past outrages and such...at least it would be real memories of real outrages and not just some sue happy Turkish lawyer who doesn't even know his own history.
            Who, after all, speaks today of the annihilation of the Armenians?
            Adolf Hitler (22 August 1939)

            Comment


            • Oh I forgot - the Turks have been living in Anatolia for 25,000 years - this is why they are suing the Geico Nendertals...for showing them up.
              Who, after all, speaks today of the annihilation of the Armenians?
              Adolf Hitler (22 August 1939)

              Comment


              • Nothing new really.


                NATIONAL MINORITIES OPPRESSED IN TURKEY
                By H. Chaqrian, translated by A.M.

                AZG Armenian Daily #229
                12/12/2007

                Human Rights and Turkey

                And Threatened by Growing Nationalism

                Yesterday the Minorities Rights Group, residing in London, published
                a report, which says that Turkey denies the existence and therefore
                the human rights of numerous ethnic, culture, language and religious
                minority groups on its territory. The report also says that Armenians,
                Kurds, Romanians and representatives of other nations are undergoing
                severe national discrimination and are threatened by nationalist
                forces in Turkey.

                According to the Minorities Rights Group report, in spite of several
                improvements connected with the negotiation process on Turkey's EU
                membership, the situation of the national minorities in that country
                still remains unsatisfactory. The authors of the report express hope
                that the amendments to the Constitution of Turkey, to be submitted to
                Milli Meclis (the Parliament of Turkey) in 2008, shall have positive
                effect on minorities' rights protection.

                This information was received from the ANF News Agency, with
                a reference to "Hye Tert", Istanbul. On the same day "Radikal"
                newspaper published an article on Turkey's official policy on
                minorities, which said, "If someone says he is a citizen of Turkey,
                but Laz, Georgian, Cherqez, Armenian, Jew, Greek, Alavi, Assyrian or
                Ezidi by origin, the Government answers that each citizens of Turkey
                is supposed to be a Turk and Sunnite by faith. The Government does
                not give you the right of having different ethnicity or of religious
                freedom. Although the 'We Are All Turks' and 'Turkey is for Turks'
                slogans proved inconsistent and were replaced by the tendency of
                considering Turkic the entire population of the Republic of Turkey,
                the Government still has a ideologically and politically biassed
                approach to the issue of national minorities.

                In the meanwhile Turkey is conducting membership negotiations with
                the EU, basing upon European values."

                Thus, the report of the Minorities Rights Group, London, is proved
                by the abovementioned publication of "Radikal", and vice versa. But
                the fact the problems of national minorities have been realized in
                the Turkish society does not imply that the problems are soon to be
                solved. The Ankara officials are going on with insisting upon the
                unitary organization of the Turkish statehood. Therefore growing
                self-consciousness of national, ethnic and other minority groups is
                considered a threat to the national integrity and security of the
                Republic of Turkey.
                General Antranik (1865-1927): “I am not a nationalist. I recognize only one nation, the nation of the oppressed.”

                Comment


                • Assyrian International News Agency
                  In Turkey, a Trilogy of Christian Murder
                  Posted GMT 12-15-2007 18:47:17
                  Let us look at the Father Santora, the Hrant Dink and the Malatya murders from a different perspective. Santora was a Catholic priest in Trabzon. Hrant Dink was of Armenian descent and a well-known intellectual but also he belonged to the Orthodox community. As everyone knows, the missionaries who were brutally killed in Malatya were Protestants. Basically three sets of murders eliminated people who belonged to three different sects of Christianity. If you are a person who likes conspiracy theories you could produce really complicated and plausible conspiracy theories in the face of these murders.

                  Imagine there are some deep state elements within Turkey who follow the Ittihat ve Terakki (Union and Progress) mentality which prevailed in the falling Ottoman Empire. If you assume the existence of this kind of central power/deep state apparatus which wishes to manipulate Turkey and its political atmosphere, and their involvement in these murders, then the whole meaning and the context of these man slaughters would be changed.

                  The message of the murders

                  Let us continue our conspiracy instruction process. What would these murders then mean? What would be the target of these moves? What kind of purpose would these murders possibly be serving? Three murders from three Christian sects in Turkey. You are sending very strong message to the every individual member of these sects that they are not wanted in Turkey. In this way you would be one step closer to your final goal of getting rid of the remaining handful Christians and you would contribute to the ethnic/religious purification of Turkey. What else? These moves will also have the potential to block the European Union process. Do not forget that just last week a Syriac priest had been kidnapped and a journalist of Greek descent have been severely beaten by unknown people, both of which indicate that, if there is such a conspiracy, it is still unfolding. If you want to continue this conspiracy theory you can go even deeper and make it more sophisticated still.

                  Trabzon and Malatya

                  Santora was killed in Trabzon which is very cosmopolitan and full of potential for conflict between different sectors of society who are sharply separated ethnically, religiously and culturally. Likewise, Malatya has a similar demographic structure. Dink was killed in Istanbul but his murder was a huge conspiracy on its own. As you see this chain of murders have the potential to serve multiple purposes at once. The Christian population will be got rid of. The seeds of huge conflicts will be sown in some cities that have huge potential for internal conflict between different sectors of the society and another obstacle between Europe and Turkey will be put in place. I could continue this conspiracy producing process but I think this is far enough!

                  People in Turkey like conspiracy theories a lot and most of the time they tend to think that foreign intelligence services have had a finger in these kinds of events in order to lead Turkey into an unknown position. Our people, however, are not aware of the fact that what has been happening in Turkey has a huge potential to create implausible, well supported conspiracy theories about Turkey's internal power balances, as I indicated above. Let us put conspiracy theories aside for a while and look at some concrete facts and try to evaluate them in this trilogy of murders.

                  If we leave aside speculations, what we have in our hands is the following: These are typical hate crimes aiming at eliminating some people because of their thoughts and their religious affiliations. In spite of these murders there has been no punishment or a prosecution for the ongoing hate speech campaigns toward minorities on the Internet and in media in Turkey. There is no awareness whatsoever on the part of the judiciary about their duty to stop these kinds of hate speech campaigns, instead they still press charges against intellectuals who publicly discuss the existence of minorities in Turkey. Basically legal provisions, similar to their western counterparts, aiming at protecting minorities against hate speech are used to punish those who claim that there are certain minorities in Turkey. This is really unbelievable but unfortunately a routine practice.

                  Orhan Kemal Cengiz
                  www.turkishdailynews.com.tr
                  General Antranik (1865-1927): “I am not a nationalist. I recognize only one nation, the nation of the oppressed.”

                  Comment



                  • Father Adriano Franchini (undated photo)


                    Italian Catholic Priest Stabbed in Western Turkey


                    By VOA News

                    16 December 2007

                    A Catholic priest has been stabbed at a church in western Turkey, in the latest attack on a Christian in the predominantly Muslim country.

                    Turkish police say Italian priest Adriano Franchini was stabbed in the stomach Sunday after leaving a church service in the city of Izmir. They say he was taken to a hospital but his wounds were not life-threatening.

                    Turkey's Anatolia news agency says police detained a 19-year-old man on suspicion of attacking the priest. The motive for the stabbing was not immediately known.

                    Anatolia says the suspected assailant had traveled to Izmir from a town in the north, Balikesir, claiming to be interested in Christianity.

                    It says Franchini had invited the man to observe mass at the church and spoke with him about converting to Christianity.

                    There have been a series of attacks on Christians in Turkey in recent years. In one of the deadlest incidents, three Protestants were killed at the office of a Christian publishing house in the eastern city of Malatya in April.

                    The European Union has long complained that Turkey, an EU applicant, is not fully protecting the religious freedoms of its Christian minority, which makes up less than one percent of the population.

                    Some information for this report was provided by AFP, AP and Reuters.

                    source

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Alexandros View Post

                      Father Adriano Franchini (undated photo)


                      Italian Catholic Priest Stabbed in Western Turkey


                      By VOA News

                      16 December 2007

                      A Catholic priest has been stabbed at a church in western Turkey, in the latest attack on a Christian in the predominantly Muslim country.

                      Turkish police say Italian priest Adriano Franchini was stabbed in the stomach Sunday after leaving a church service in the city of Izmir. They say he was taken to a hospital but his wounds were not life-threatening.

                      Turkey's Anatolia news agency says police detained a 19-year-old man on suspicion of attacking the priest. The motive for the stabbing was not immediately known.

                      Anatolia says the suspected assailant had traveled to Izmir from a town in the north, Balikesir, claiming to be interested in Christianity.

                      It says Franchini had invited the man to observe mass at the church and spoke with him about converting to Christianity.

                      There have been a series of attacks on Christians in Turkey in recent years. In one of the deadlest incidents, three Protestants were killed at the office of a Christian publishing house in the eastern city of Malatya in April.

                      The European Union has long complained that Turkey, an EU applicant, is not fully protecting the religious freedoms of its Christian minority, which makes up less than one percent of the population.

                      Some information for this report was provided by AFP, AP and Reuters.

                      source
                      THE ANSWER IS "NO"

                      Italian Catholic priest stabbed in Turkey


                      ANKARA (Reuters) - An Italian Roman Catholic priest was stabbed on Sunday at his church in the city of Izmir in western Turkey, police said, in an incident that recalled the fatal shooting of another Italian priest in Turkey in 2006.

                      The priest, identified as Adriano Franchini, was taken to hospital. His life was not in danger, a police spokesman told Reuters. He had been stabbed in the stomach.

                      Police have detained three people, the spokesman said, adding it was too soon to say what the motive of the attack was.

                      The incident follows a spate of attacks in mainly Muslim but secular Turkey in recent years on Christian targets.

                      Italian Catholic priest Andrea Santoro was shot dead in his church in the Turkish Black Sea city of Trabzon in February 2006 by a teenager who is now in jail.

                      In April this year three Christians -- a German national and two Turks -- were killed in a Bible publishing house in the eastern town of Malatya. They had their throats cut. The trial of their suspected killers has begun.

                      Also this year, Turkish-Armenian journalist Hrant Dink, a Christian, was shot dead outside his office in Istanbul by a young ultra-nationalist gunman.

                      The European Union has long complained that Turkey, an EU applicant, fails to fully protect the religious freedoms of its tiny Christian minority, which numbers barely 100,000 in a total population of nearly 75 million.

                      In both the Dink and the Malatya killings, Turkish media have suggested nationalist elements in the security forces may have egged on the youthful killers, or at least ignored signals that they were about to carry out their attacks.

                      Some Turkish nationalists fear Christian missionaries operating in Turkey pose a threat to national security.

                      (Reporting by Inci Ozturk, writing by Gareth Jones, editing by Janet Lawrence)
                      General Antranik (1865-1927): “I am not a nationalist. I recognize only one nation, the nation of the oppressed.”

                      Comment

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