Announcement

Collapse

Forum Rules (Everyone Must Read!!!)

1] What you CAN NOT post.

You agree, through your use of this service, that you will not use this forum to post any material which is:
- abusive
- vulgar
- hateful
- harassing
- personal attacks
- obscene

You also may not:
- post images that are too large (max is 500*500px)
- post any copyrighted material unless the copyright is owned by you or cited properly.
- post in UPPER CASE, which is considered yelling
- post messages which insult the Armenians, Armenian culture, traditions, etc
- post racist or other intentionally insensitive material that insults or attacks another culture (including Turks)

The Ankap thread is excluded from the strict rules because that place is more relaxed and you can vent and engage in light insults and humor. Notice it's not a blank ticket, but just a place to vent. If you go into the Ankap thread, you enter at your own risk of being clowned on.
What you PROBABLY SHOULD NOT post...
Do not post information that you will regret putting out in public. This site comes up on Google, is cached, and all of that, so be aware of that as you post. Do not ask the staff to go through and delete things that you regret making available on the web for all to see because we will not do it. Think before you post!


2] Use descriptive subject lines & research your post. This means use the SEARCH.

This reduces the chances of double-posting and it also makes it easier for people to see what they do/don't want to read. Using the search function will identify existing threads on the topic so we do not have multiple threads on the same topic.

3] Keep the focus.

Each forum has a focus on a certain topic. Questions outside the scope of a certain forum will either be moved to the appropriate forum, closed, or simply be deleted. Please post your topic in the most appropriate forum. Users that keep doing this will be warned, then banned.

4] Behave as you would in a public location.

This forum is no different than a public place. Behave yourself and act like a decent human being (i.e. be respectful). If you're unable to do so, you're not welcome here and will be made to leave.

5] Respect the authority of moderators/admins.

Public discussions of moderator/admin actions are not allowed on the forum. It is also prohibited to protest moderator actions in titles, avatars, and signatures. If you don't like something that a moderator did, PM or email the moderator and try your best to resolve the problem or difference in private.

6] Promotion of sites or products is not permitted.

Advertisements are not allowed in this venue. No blatant advertising or solicitations of or for business is prohibited.
This includes, but not limited to, personal resumes and links to products or
services with which the poster is affiliated, whether or not a fee is charged
for the product or service. Spamming, in which a user posts the same message repeatedly, is also prohibited.

7] We retain the right to remove any posts and/or Members for any reason, without prior notice.


- PLEASE READ -

Members are welcome to read posts and though we encourage your active participation in the forum, it is not required. If you do participate by posting, however, we expect that on the whole you contribute something to the forum. This means that the bulk of your posts should not be in "fun" threads (e.g. Ankap, Keep & Kill, This or That, etc.). Further, while occasionally it is appropriate to simply voice your agreement or approval, not all of your posts should be of this variety: "LOL Member213!" "I agree."
If it is evident that a member is simply posting for the sake of posting, they will be removed.


8] These Rules & Guidelines may be amended at any time. (last update September 17, 2009)

If you believe an individual is repeatedly breaking the rules, please report to admin/moderator.
See more
See less

Yezidis in ARMENIA

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Yezidis in ARMENIA

    Armenian 97.7%, Yezidi 1%, Russian 0.9%, other 0.4% (2001 census)
    There is 1% yezidi population in Armenia.I want to learn something about Yezidis in ARMENIA.Are they like Kurds in other counries?(in a bad situation)I am waiting for armenians' informations about it.
    [COLOR="Red"]A TANGO BETWEEN GOD AND SATAN[/COLOR]

  • #2
    I read that Yezidis were killed in Mesopotamia for years.I know that there were a lot of Yezidis in Turkey but they were killed because of their diffrerent religions .
    [COLOR="Red"]A TANGO BETWEEN GOD AND SATAN[/COLOR]

    Comment


    • #3
      Is this also a genocide done by many nations(turks,arabs,even kurds who are muslims?
      [COLOR="Red"]A TANGO BETWEEN GOD AND SATAN[/COLOR]

      Comment


      • #4
        Agro-Industrial Party [Vladimir BADALYAN]; Armenia Party [Myasnik MALKHASYAN]; Armenian National Movement or ANM [Alex ARZUMANYAN, chairman]; Armenian Ramkavar Liberal Party or HRAK [Harutyun MIRZAKHANYAN, chairman]; Armenian Revolutionary Federation ("Dashnak" Party) or ARF [Vahan HOVHANISSIAN]; Democratic Party [Aram SARKISYAN]; Justice Bloc (comprised of the Democratic Party, National Democratic Party, National Democratic Union, the People's Party, and the Republic Party) [Stepan DEMIRCHYAN]; National Democratic Party [Shavarsh KOCHARIAN]; National Democratic Union or NDU [Vazgen MANUKIAN]; National Revival Party [Albert BAZEYAN]; National Unity Party [Artashes GEGAMIAN, chairman]; People's Party of Armenia [Stepan DEMIRCHYAN]; Republic Party [Aram SARKISYAN, chairman]; Republican Party or RPA [Andranik MARKARYAN]; Rule of Law Party [Artur BAGHDASARYAN, chairman]; Union of Constitutional Rights [Hrant KHACHATURYAN]; United Labor Party [Gurgen ARSENYAN]
        [COLOR="Red"]A TANGO BETWEEN GOD AND SATAN[/COLOR]

        Comment


        • #5
          there are too many parties for a 3 million country.Even Turkey don't have so many poltical parties.And Turkey is 70 million.
          [COLOR="Red"]A TANGO BETWEEN GOD AND SATAN[/COLOR]

          Comment


          • #6
            The Yazidi or Yezidi (Kurdish:  zidÓ) are adherents of a small Middle Eastern religion with ancient origins. They are primarily ethnic Kurds, and most Yazidis live near Mosul, Iraq with smaller communities in Syria, Turkey, Iran, Georgia and Armenia, and are estimated to number ca. 500,000 individuals in total. There are also Yazidi refugees in Europe.
            [COLOR="Red"]A TANGO BETWEEN GOD AND SATAN[/COLOR]

            Comment


            • #7
              The Yazidi or Yezidi (Kurdish:  zidÓ) are adherents of a small Middle Eastern religion with ancient origins. They are primarily ethnic Kurds, and most Yazidis live near Mosul, Iraq with smaller communities in Syria, Turkey, Iran, Georgia and Armenia, and are estimated to number ca. 500,000 individuals in total. There are also Yazidi refugees in Europe.

              The origins of Yazidism are ultimately shrouded in the mist of the ancient Middle East. Although the Yazidis speak Kurdish, their religion shows strong influence from archaic Levantine and Islamic religions. Their principal holy site is in Mosul, Iraq. The Yazidis own name for themselves is  zidÓ or  zÓdÓ or, in some areas, Dasini (the last, strictly speaking a tribal name). Some scholars have derived the name Yazidi from Old Iranian yazata (divine being), while others say it is a derivation from Umayyad Caliph Yazid I (Yazid bin Muawiyah), revered by the Yazidis as an incarnation of the divine figure Sultan Ezi (this is no longer widely accepted). Yazidis, themselves, believe that their name is derived from the word Yezdan or  zid meaning God. The Yazidis' cultural practices are observably Kurdish, and almost all speak Kurmanji (Northern Kurdish), with the exception of the villages of Baiqa and Bahazane in Northern Iraq, where Arabic is spoken. Kurmanji is the language of almost all the orally transmitted religious traditions of the Yazidis. Thus, religious origins are somewhat complex.

              The religion of the Yazidis is a highly syncretistic one: Sufi influence and imagery can be seen in their religious vocabulary, especially in the terminology of their esoteric literature, but much of the mythology is non-Islamic, and their cosmogonies apparently have many points in common with those of ancient Iranian religions. Early writers attempted to describe Yazidi origins, broadly speaking, in terms of Islam, or Iranian, or sometimes even pagan religions; however, publications since the 1990s have shown such an approach to be over-simplistic.[1]

              The origin of the Yazidi religion is now usually seen by scholars as a complex process of syncretism, whereby the belief-system and practices of a local faith had a profound influence on the religiosity of adherents of the Adawiyya sufi order living in the Kurdish mountains, and caused it to deviate from Islamic norms relatively soon after the death of its founder, Sheikh Adii Ibn Mustafa who was of Umayyad descent. He settled in the valley of Lalish (some thirty-six miles north-east of Mosul) in the early 12th century CE. Shaeikh Adii himself, a figure of undoubted orthodoxy, enjoyed widespread influence. He died in 1162, and his tomb at Lalish is a focal point of Yazidi pilgrimage. During the fourteenth century, important Kurdish tribes whose sphere of influence stretched well into what is now Turkey (including, for a period, the rulers of the principality of Jazira) are cited in historical sources as Yazidi.
              [COLOR="Red"]A TANGO BETWEEN GOD AND SATAN[/COLOR]

              Comment


              • #8
                Here is some information I get
                [COLOR="Red"]A TANGO BETWEEN GOD AND SATAN[/COLOR]

                Comment


                • #9
                  RUDO, from my travels to Armenia I have seen that Yezdis have many opportunities in Armenia. Our house in Yerevan has many Yezdis living in it. They are in equal conditions as Armenians and get along great with Armenians. They have their own practices and in some ways culture, but in all other manners they are Armenians. Their children are in the same school classes with Armenians, Kurds, Persians and others. They are patriotic because thousands of years of Armenian governments and states have protected them and their rights. Outside of the city they are nearly all in Agriculture. They live a nomadic life as you would probably expect. When I climbed Mt. Aragats in 2004 where many of the Yezdis outside Yerevan are concentrated, their tents can be seen scattered accross the mountainside. The majority of those that I encountered were shepherds.

                  They are involved to some extent politically and enjoy essentially the same level of freedom and prosperity as everyone else in Armenia.

                  Hope this helps.
                  [url]http://www.ArmenianAncestry.com[/url] - [COLOR="Red"]Armenian[/COLOR] [COLOR="Blue"]Genealogy[/COLOR] [COLOR="Orange"]Forum[/COLOR]

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Hovik
                    RUDO, from my travels to Armenia I have seen that Yezdis have many opportunities in Armenia. Our house in Yerevan has many Yezdis living in it. They are in equal conditions as Armenians and get along great with Armenians. They have their own practices and in some ways culture, but in all other manners they are Armenians. Their children are in the same school classes with Armenians, Kurds, Persians and others. They are patriotic because thousands of years of Armenian governments and states have protected them and their rights. Outside of the city they are nearly all in Agriculture. They live a nomadic life as you would probably expect. When I climbed Mt. Aragats in 2004 where many of the Yezdis outside Yerevan are concentrated, their tents can be seen scattered accross the mountainside. The majority of those that I encountered were shepherds.

                    They are involved to some extent politically and enjoy essentially the same level of freedom and prosperity as everyone else in Armenia.

                    Hope this helps.
                    Thanks for your informations.I am happy to hear that Kurds in Armenia are happy.One day maybe I will visit Armenia and Yezidis.
                    [COLOR="Red"]A TANGO BETWEEN GOD AND SATAN[/COLOR]

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X