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Merry 'Armenian Christmas' everyone

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  • Merry 'Armenian Christmas' everyone

    Kristos dznav yev haydnetsav... Orhnial eh dzenoonte Kristosi (That's what we say... right?)

    WHY ARMENIANS CELEBRATE CHRISTMAS ON JANUARY 6

    Painting by Roudolf Kharatian

    "Armenian Christmas," as it is popularly called, is a culmination of celebrations of events related to Christ's Incarnation. Theophany or Epiphany, or Astvadz-a-haytnootyoon in Armenian, means "revelation of God," which is the central theme of the Christmas Season in the Armenian Church. During Christmas two major events are celebrated in the church: the Nativity of Christ in Bethlehem and his Baptism in the River Jordan. The Armenians celebrate this major feast on January 6th.

    It is frequently asked why Armenians do not celebrate Christmas on December 25th with the rest of the world. The exact date of Christ's birth has not been historically established; neither is recorded in the Gospels. However, until the fourth century, all Christian churches celebrated Christ's Birth on January 6th.

    The Church of Rome changed the date from January 6th to December 25th in the fourth century. The change was intended to subdue an ancient pagan feast celebrating the birth of the Sun on December 25th. At the time, Christians also were tempted to participate in these pagan festivities. Thus the church hierarchy decided to celebrate the Birth of Christ on December 25th and the feast of Epiphany on January 6th.

    Armenia was not affected by this change for the simple fact that there were no such pagan practices in Armenia at the time and the Armenian Church was not a satellite of the Church of Rome. Remaining faithful to the tradition of their forefathers, Armenians continue to celebrate Christmas on January 6th until today.

    IN THE HOLY LAND

    In the Holy Land, the Orthodox churches use the old calendar the Julian calendar, which is 13 days behind the Gregorian, the one we use today to determine the date of religious feasts. As such, the Armenians celebrate Christmas on January 19th in Bethlehem.

    On the day before Armenian Christmas, January 18th, the Armenian Patriarch together with the clergy and the faithful, travels from Jerusalem to the city of Bethlehem, to the Church of Nativity of Christ, where elaborate and colorful ceremonies take place.

    Outside, in the large square of the Church of Nativity, the Mayor of Bethlehem and City officials greet the Patriarch and his entourage. A procession, led by Armenian scouts and their band, brings the Patriarch into the Church of Nativity, while priests, seminarians and the faithful join in the sing of Armenian hymns.

    Afterwards, festive services are held in the Cathedral of Nativity all night long and until the next day, January 19th. In recent years, however, as a result of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Christmas celebrations in Bethlehem have been less colorful and restrained because of political tensions and security problems in the West Bank.

    By Hratch Tchilingirian
    The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposing ideas in mind at the same time and still retain the ability to function. -- F. Scott Fitzgerald

  • #2
    Shnorhavor Sourp Dznoont polorin!

    Comment


    • #3
      Merry Christmas you guys! I love our Christmas....it's beautiful!
      "Here I am, rock you like a hurricane!"- Los Escorpiones

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by violette829 Merry Christmas you guys! I love our Christmas....it's beautiful!
        I love the fact that it is not commercialized and it's not about gifts and money. January 6th is all about family, and I like that.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Merry 'Armenian Christmas' everyone

          Originally posted by ckBejug Kristos dznav yev haydnetsav... Orhnial eh dzenoonte Kristosi (That's what we say... right?)

          WHY ARMENIANS CELEBRATE CHRISTMAS ON JANUARY 6

          Painting by Roudolf Kharatian

          "Armenian Christmas," as it is popularly called, is a culmination of celebrations of events related to Christ's Incarnation. Theophany or Epiphany, or Astvadz-a-haytnootyoon in Armenian, means "revelation of God," which is the central theme of the Christmas Season in the Armenian Church. During Christmas two major events are celebrated in the church: the Nativity of Christ in Bethlehem and his Baptism in the River Jordan. The Armenians celebrate this major feast on January 6th.

          It is frequently asked why Armenians do not celebrate Christmas on December 25th with the rest of the world. The exact date of Christ's birth has not been historically established; neither is recorded in the Gospels. However, until the fourth century, all Christian churches celebrated Christ's Birth on January 6th.

          The Church of Rome changed the date from January 6th to December 25th in the fourth century. The change was intended to subdue an ancient pagan feast celebrating the birth of the Sun on December 25th. At the time, Christians also were tempted to participate in these pagan festivities. Thus the church hierarchy decided to celebrate the Birth of Christ on December 25th and the feast of Epiphany on January 6th.

          Armenia was not affected by this change for the simple fact that there were no such pagan practices in Armenia at the time and the Armenian Church was not a satellite of the Church of Rome. Remaining faithful to the tradition of their forefathers, Armenians continue to celebrate Christmas on January 6th until today.

          IN THE HOLY LAND

          In the Holy Land, the Orthodox churches use the old calendar the Julian calendar, which is 13 days behind the Gregorian, the one we use today to determine the date of religious feasts. As such, the Armenians celebrate Christmas on January 19th in Bethlehem.

          On the day before Armenian Christmas, January 18th, the Armenian Patriarch together with the clergy and the faithful, travels from Jerusalem to the city of Bethlehem, to the Church of Nativity of Christ, where elaborate and colorful ceremonies take place.

          Outside, in the large square of the Church of Nativity, the Mayor of Bethlehem and City officials greet the Patriarch and his entourage. A procession, led by Armenian scouts and their band, brings the Patriarch into the Church of Nativity, while priests, seminarians and the faithful join in the sing of Armenian hymns.

          Afterwards, festive services are held in the Cathedral of Nativity all night long and until the next day, January 19th. In recent years, however, as a result of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Christmas celebrations in Bethlehem have been less colorful and restrained because of political tensions and security problems in the West Bank.

          By Hratch Tchilingirian

          YES thank you for providing us with such crucial yet relevant information. That is one article you have read and analyzed to me that makes the most sense of all and thus the most intelligent post by you. Kudos to you. We needed that and you proved that all that once again that there is no such a thing as "Armenian Christmas" it is the "Christmas" of all of the Orthodox/Apostolic Christians celebrating the FEAST of the gathering which was later changed by Rome. Once again, THANK YOU.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Re: Merry 'Armenian Christmas' everyone

            Originally posted by Nimrod YES thank you for providing us with such crucial yet relevant information. That is one article you have read and analyzed to me that makes the most sense of all and thus the most intelligent post by you. Kudos to you. We needed that and you proved that all that once again that there is no such a thing as "Armenian Christmas" it is the "Christmas" of all of the Orthodox/Apostolic Christians celebrating the FEAST of the gathering which was later changed by Rome. Once again, THANK YOU.
            Are you being sarcastic again? I can't even tell. We only call it 'Armenian Christmas' because the rest of the western world doesn't celebrate it on this day. Neither do most Armenians. I wouldn't take the whole naming it 'Armenian Christmas' thing as we're owning the day and making it our own or anything. We're all intelligent enough to know better than that, that said... what's your point?
            The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposing ideas in mind at the same time and still retain the ability to function. -- F. Scott Fitzgerald

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            • #7
              MERRY CHRISTMAS EVERYONE SHONORHAVOR SOORP DZNUND SAXIT
              "Did you hear about the rose that
              grew from a crack in the concrete?
              Proving nature's law is wrong it
              learned to walk without having feet.
              Funny it seems, but by keeping it's dreams, it learned to breathe fresh air. Long live the rose that grew from
              concrete when no one else ever cared." ~Tupac Amaru Shakur (This is dedicated in Loving memory of my brother Armen and my cousin Gor)
              I guess change is good for any of us

              Comment


              • #8
                hmmmmm we celebrate it ont the 25th...heck we did it on the 24th this yr...opps? lol
                When you're in deep xxxx, keep your mouth shut.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Merry 'Armenian Christmas' everyone

                  Originally posted by ckBejug Kristos dznav yev haydnetsav... Orhnial eh dzenoonte Kristosi (That's what we say... right?)
                  no
                  we say "tsezi mezi medz avedis".
                  during easter we say "orhnyal eh haroutyoune krisdosi". I guess that's what got u confused.
                  - and you're gonna forget about me?
                  =Every Day...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Re: Re: Merry 'Armenian Christmas' everyone

                    Originally posted by ckBejug Are you being sarcastic again? I can't even tell. We only call it 'Armenian Christmas' because the rest of the western world doesn't celebrate it on this day. Neither do most Armenians. I wouldn't take the whole naming it 'Armenian Christmas' thing as we're owning the day and making it our own or anything. We're all intelligent enough to know better than that, that said... what's your point?
                    bejug, he has a point.
                    january 6th is not "Armenian Christmas" day.
                    it's Orthodox/apostolic Christmas day.
                    during the roman times, most of the eastern countries (byzantium) such as russia, Greece, assyria, Armenia, etc... belonged to the orthodox church. and Today, we're not alone celebrating it on the 6th. it's just that most americans are Catholic. otherwise, All Greek and russian and assyrian Orthodox churches join us in celebrating christmas on January 6th. just thought I'd clarify.
                    Last edited by jahannam; 01-05-2004, 10:27 PM.
                    - and you're gonna forget about me?
                    =Every Day...

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