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Armenia's Economic Pulse

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  • Re: Armenia's Economic Pulse

    Armenia’s PM forecasts 5% inflation and 4.6% economic growth


    YEREVAN.- Armenia will register 5% inflation this year, half as much last year, said Armenian Prime Minster Tigran Sargsyan.

    Speaking about 4.6% budgeted economic growth, he said that it is realistic approach stressing that it would contribute to reduction of poverty rate.

    Premier explained increase in poverty rate by economic decline and high inflation registered in 2009-2010. In particular, economic decline made 14%, while inflation reaches 10%.

    The government is trying to encourage economic growth and diversify economy, PM added


    __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ ____________________
    http://news.am/eng/news/72333.html
    <<եթե զենք էլ չլինի' ես քարերով կկրվեմ>>

    Comment


    • Re: Armenia's Economic Pulse

      Is there any legitimacy to this? I know economic numbers are greatly inflated and distorted. For those who know more about the economic situation, to what extend is it true, and what does it mean for the overal situation of the country, and more specifically the emmigration problem.
      <<եթե զենք էլ չլինի' ես քարերով կկրվեմ>>

      Comment


      • Re: Armenia's Economic Pulse

        .

        .
        Interesting misadventure of an Armenian entrepreneur in Armenia.
        Subject section starts at 12.00



        Politics is not about the pursuit of morality nor what's right or wrong
        Its about self interest at personal and national level often at odds with the above.
        Great politicians pursue the National interest and small politicians personal interests

        Comment


        • Re: Armenia's Economic Pulse

          Zee News, India
          Sept 25 2011

          Armenian emigration creates 'women-only' villages

          PTI

          Vardadzor: There are no men to be seen in the rural lanes of Vardzador
          as mother-of-four Susanna Asatrian makes her way to the fields to
          thresh barley and wheat.

          Her husband has left the country in search of work like so many other
          men in remote, impoverished Armenian settlements, leaving them almost
          entirely populated by women to symbolise the country's depopulation
          problem.

          "It's a total matriarchate. We even joke that our village's name
          should be changed from 'Canyon of Roses' to 'Canyon of Women'," said
          the 36-year-old


          In the midst of the harvest season in Vardadzor, around 130 kilometres
          from the ex-Soviet state's capital Yerevan, women do the hard
          agricultural labour, prepare for the long winter ahead and raise their
          children practically without male assistance.

          "The children miss their father, but what can we do?" asked Asatrian.

          In villages like this, women traditionally marry young and their
          husbands often leave after their honeymoon to work as migrant
          labourers, only returning for a couple of months each year.


          The men who remain are largely elderly. More than a million people
          left Armenia in the years from 1988 to 2007, with around two-thirds of
          them relocating to Russia, like Asatrian's husband, leaving the small
          Caucasus republic with a current population of 3.2 million.

          http://zeenews.india.com/news/world/...es_733452.html
          Hayastan or Bust.

          Comment


          • Re: Armenia's Economic Pulse

            What do you all think about the Nordic Model - and do you believe it would be a good system for Armenia?

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nordic_model
            Մեկ Ազգ, Մեկ Մշակույթ
            ---
            "Western Assimilation is the greatest threat to the Armenian nation since the Armenian Genocide."

            Comment


            • Re: Armenia's Economic Pulse

              HEIFER ARMENIA: SAVING ARMENIA'S FARMS

              Heifer International launches new efforts in Armenia to build the
              rural economy LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (Oct. 12, 2011) - Heifer
              International, a worldwide development nonprofit, is scaling up its
              efforts in Armenia to save rural farms and give Armenian men a reason
              to come home and build farm businesses with their families.

              During the Armenian Genocide, relief workers from the U.S.-based
              Church of the Brethren offered assistance to Armenian survivors robbed
              of food, water and even hope. Inspired by the work of his
              congregation, Dan West, the founder of Heifer International, later
              served as a relief worker in the Spanish Civil War. He became
              frustrated by the inadequacy of offering food rations. "What these
              children need is not a cup of milk; they need a cow," he thought. West
              saw that the greatest possible gift is the dignity of being able to
              provide for oneself and one's family.

              Since 1944, Heifer International has worked in more than 120
              nations. Heifer projects work with participants to empower entire
              communities for years to come. Heifer International is among the most
              respected international development organizations, with a track record
              of success that is second to none. Families who receive gifts of
              livestock and training from Heifer are required to "pass on" their
              animal's first offspring, or its equivalent, to another family in
              need.

              Heifer Armenia has worked with more than 8,000 Armenian families in
              the past 11 years. Fifty-eight projects have built up viable family
              farms through gifts of cattle, buffalos, pigs, chickens, rabbits,
              sheep, bees, worms, tree seedlings and organic produce. The projects
              first create food security for the participating families, and then
              surplus product is sold to earn money for education, medical care and
              other necessities.

              The challenges for small farms in Armenia are formidable: livestock
              health is poor, and pasture management is practically
              non-existent. The biggest problem, according to Heifer Armenia
              Director Anahit Ghazanchyan, is the rampant emigration of Armenia's
              rural men, leaving farms under the care of overworked mothers and the
              elderly.

              However, there are solutions to rural Armenia's problems. Pietro
              Turilli, Heifer International's Vice President for Central and Eastern
              European programs, says, "Armenia's small farms have tremendous
              potential to not only feed the people of Armenia, but to become real
              market players, which would dramatically reduce poverty."

              Heifer International's efforts to reach more families in Armenia
              attracted the interest of the World Bank and Armenia's Ministry of
              Agriculture, which invited Heifer Armenia to be a partner in a
              large-scale "Community Agricultural Resource Management and
              Competitiveness" (CARMAC) project. CARMAC is focused on reversing
              environmental damage created through unsustainable grazing, increasing
              the economic viability of small farms through infrastructure work, and
              increasing productivity to gain access to more markets. The project
              will work in six marzes (regions) with a total target population of
              78,000 people.

              We would love to introduce your readers to the work that Heifer is
              doing in Armenia and elsewhere. We can provide more information on the
              projects, including a map of project locations, as well as accounts of
              project successes.

              Heifer Armenia's country program director, Dr. Anahit Ghazanchyn, will
              be in the U.S. from October 18 to October 28 and will be available for
              interviews. Also available is Heifer International Vice President for
              Central and Eastern European programs, Pietro Turilli. Please contact
              us if you'd like more information on Heifer in Armenia.

              About Heifer International

              Heifer's mission is to end hunger and poverty while caring for the
              Earth. Since 1944, Heifer International has provided livestock and
              environmentally sound agricultural training to improve the lives of
              those who struggle daily for reliable sources of food and
              income. Heifer is currently working in 50 countries, including the
              United States, to help families and communities become more
              self-reliant. For more information, visit
              Hayastan or Bust.

              Comment


              • Re: Armenia's Economic Pulse

                Originally posted by Mos View Post
                What do you all think about the Nordic Model - and do you believe it would be a good system for Armenia?

                http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nordic_model
                Sounds like it is better then what Armenia is currently using but keep in mind that it is a general model and various versions of it can be used and created. Hell it sounds better then what the USA is using to but the form of government is not Armenia's big problem. The big economic problems for Armenia are its closed borders, the amount of gdp it must spend on defence, desertification, security and its lack of resources. As i have mentioned many times befor the form of the government is a secondary issue and adressing the issues that really do matter is far more important. It does not matter much if the solutions to Armenia's problems are brought forth by communists, capitalists, democrats, socialists, dictators, kings, clowns.. the important thing is to effectively adress the problems facing the country.
                Hayastan or Bust.

                Comment


                • Re: Armenia's Economic Pulse

                  Originally posted by Haykakan View Post
                  Sounds like it is better then what Armenia is currently using but keep in mind that it is a general model and various versions of it can be used and created. Hell it sounds better then what the USA is using to but the form of government is not Armenia's big problem. The big economic problems for Armenia are its closed borders, the amount of gdp it must spend on defence, desertification, security and its lack of resources. As i have mentioned many times befor the form of the government is a secondary issue and adressing the issues that really do matter is far more important. It does not matter much if the solutions to Armenia's problems are brought forth by communists, capitalists, democrats, socialists, dictators, kings, clowns.. the important thing is to effectively adress the problems facing the country.
                  Well the type of government does matter because a unjust government will never work for the common good. And this is why people debate and even die for bringing about new forms of government, whether it be democratic, monarchical or socialist.
                  For the first time in more than 600 years, Armenia is free and independent, and we are therefore obligated
                  to place our national interests ahead of our personal gains or aspirations.



                  http://www.armenianhighland.com/main.html

                  Comment


                  • Re: Armenia's Economic Pulse

                    Originally posted by Armanen View Post
                    Well the type of government does matter because a unjust government will never work for the common good. And this is why people debate and even die for bringing about new forms of government, whether it be democratic, monarchical or socialist.
                    What you just wrote makes no sence. My argument is that regardless of the form a government takes it can be bad or good and the important thing is that it effectively adresses the problems facing the nation and not what form it takes. There have been good democracies,monarchs,dictators,kings...in the past and there have been bad ones and my point is that the form or of the government does not make it good or bad, it is the people involved that are good or bad rulers. I dont give a rats ass if Armenia is a democracy or a monarchy or a dictatorship as long as the force in power is doing the right things for the country. People have been brainwashed to think that democracy is some magic cure that will solve any countries problems..well that is bs. The onlyform of government i do not want for sure is a theocracy because religion suxass but even then a good leader can make even that work well.
                    Hayastan or Bust.

                    Comment


                    • Re: Armenia's Economic Pulse

                      Given Armenia's situation, our government should most importantly be composed of leaders who are nationalists, in that they stand firmly for the security of Armenia and Karabakh. We are not Switzerland, we are surrounded by enemies, thus the most important thing is a government that sustains the security of Armenia, even if it means having to infringe on personal rights and freedoms. We should be ready to trade some rights for greater security. Now I am left-winger when it comes to policies, more I believe in a big, strong government that provides for its citizens, such as healthcare, benefits, education, etc. (Welfare state) And an economy that is a mix between free market and government intervention. So in short Social Democracy or more accurately the Nordic Model. Of course I would like such a model used in Armenia, but I know the most important issue is our national security, thus such welfare is secondary. We should go after which form of government is best for Armenia, more it's the quality of the leaders, the fact that they will stand up for Armenia and not instead fill their pockets and support their business friends and cronies.
                      Մեկ Ազգ, Մեկ Մշակույթ
                      ---
                      "Western Assimilation is the greatest threat to the Armenian nation since the Armenian Genocide."

                      Comment

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