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NO turkey IN EUROPE

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  • Joseph
    replied
    Turks and the EU

    Turks pessimistic over EU debate
    By Sarah Rainsford
    BBC News, Istanbul

    Until last week, the EU had all but slipped off the Turkish news agenda.


    Turkey began negotiations over EU membership in late 2005
    The headlines featured everything but the EU: a senior judge shot dead in court, mass protests in Ankara, or fierce speculation over next year's elections.

    Suddenly, Brussels is big news again.

    Over the past week everyone from the prime minister down has been re-declaring their commitment to the EU accession process and to democratic reform.

    It is no coincidence that these protestations come as Europe prepares to deliver a harsh message to Turkey, first at a meeting of foreign ministers in Luxembourg on Monday, then at the European Council summit mid-week.

    The government here stands accused of flagging enthusiasm for membership, and a go-slow on reforms.

    "It is unthinkable that the government's attitude to the EU could change at the end of a 40-year process, after we achieved the historic victory in October," Turkey's chief EU negotiator insisted.

    But eight months on from the start of accession talks, such claims are beginning to sound hollow.

    Business frustrated

    Turkish business leaders are some of the country's strongest advocates of EU membership.

    Last week they accused the government of neglecting accession preparations in favour of a narrow domestic agenda. It is a view widely echoed here.


    An Istanbul exhibition highlighted Turkey's EU challenges
    "The government virtually stopped all reforms in December 2004 when it got the green light to start membership talks, and reforms realised before then are not being implemented," says Cengiz Aktar, Professor of European Studies at Bahcesehir University.

    "We are seeing a rise in nationalist and militarist moods here, and the government - which is already trying to win the next election - has decided to appeal to these nationalist voters," he adds.

    In the current climate the EU agenda does appear to have been shelved on such sensitive issues as minority rights, the Kurdish issue and, most contentious of all, Cyprus.

    Staff at the EU information centre in the heart of European Istanbul say public interest in the accession process has also fallen away in recent months.

    The drop-in centre, piled high with glossy brochures, now deals with just 20 enquiries on an average day, mostly from students seeking advice on study grants.

    One day last week, two men had come to discover how EU standards would affect their textile business. In the background, a third visitor tapped away on a computer.

    "I come in regularly to check how the talks are going," Sevket Tuci explained, clearly an EU fan. He declared himself as frustrated as Brussels that Turkey is slacking in its commitments.

    "As a nation we love leaving things to the last minute. It's like exams - we cram the night before, then get lazy again as soon as the date has passed. I think that's what has happened here."

    Losing faith

    But if the government is guilty of being distracted, many Turks save a good deal of blame for their failing EU-enthusiasm for Europe itself.

    Even the children on a school field-trip to the EU centre sense the problem.


    The Cyprus issue is hanging like the sword of Damocles over Turkey's EU accession process
    Cengiz Aktar
    Professor of European Studies
    "I want Turkey to join the EU so that if something bad happens with a non-EU country, they can stand beside us," says 12-year-old Melis.

    "But I don't think it will ever happen. I've heard not many countries want us there. It's not very nice not to be wanted."

    "Public opinion here is less and less believing in the successful outcome of these negotiations," explains Emre Gonen of Bilgi University.

    He links that to strong signals coming from some in Europe that Turkey should never be allowed to join the club. Those signals are reinforced by the fact that Turkey is the only candidate country with no firm date for accession.

    "That is extremely dangerous," says Emre Gonen. "Negotiations are aimed at membership. If that aim is debated daily, it leaves little room for passion on the part of the candidate country."

    Drift

    A lecture from Brussels seems unlikely to reignite Turkish passions for the EU.

    But supporters hope it will act as a wake-up call for the government - while warning of a major dispute still looming on the horizon.

    "The Cyprus issue is hanging like the sword of Damocles over Turkey's EU accession process," says Cengiz Aktar.

    The EU says Ankara must honour its commitment to open its ports and airports to Greek Cypriot traffic by the end of this year. Turkey refuses unless the EU lifts the isolation of northern Cyprus.

    "The only way to bypass this is to work hard for harmonisation with the EU, so Brussels realises Turkey is serious and it can't call the whole thing off over Cyprus," Cengiz Aktar argues.

    "If Turkey can't do that it may all collapse. Then we will drift away from Europe and the West. That is definitely a possibility."

    Leave a comment:


  • Joseph
    replied
    Turks and the EU

    Turks pessimistic over EU debate
    By Sarah Rainsford
    BBC News, Istanbul

    Until last week, the EU had all but slipped off the Turkish news agenda.


    Turkey began negotiations over EU membership in late 2005
    The headlines featured everything but the EU: a senior judge shot dead in court, mass protests in Ankara, or fierce speculation over next year's elections.

    Suddenly, Brussels is big news again.

    Over the past week everyone from the prime minister down has been re-declaring their commitment to the EU accession process and to democratic reform.

    It is no coincidence that these protestations come as Europe prepares to deliver a harsh message to Turkey, first at a meeting of foreign ministers in Luxembourg on Monday, then at the European Council summit mid-week.

    The government here stands accused of flagging enthusiasm for membership, and a go-slow on reforms.

    "It is unthinkable that the government's attitude to the EU could change at the end of a 40-year process, after we achieved the historic victory in October," Turkey's chief EU negotiator insisted.

    But eight months on from the start of accession talks, such claims are beginning to sound hollow.

    Business frustrated

    Turkish business leaders are some of the country's strongest advocates of EU membership.

    Last week they accused the government of neglecting accession preparations in favour of a narrow domestic agenda. It is a view widely echoed here.


    An Istanbul exhibition highlighted Turkey's EU challenges
    "The government virtually stopped all reforms in December 2004 when it got the green light to start membership talks, and reforms realised before then are not being implemented," says Cengiz Aktar, Professor of European Studies at Bahcesehir University.

    "We are seeing a rise in nationalist and militarist moods here, and the government - which is already trying to win the next election - has decided to appeal to these nationalist voters," he adds.

    In the current climate the EU agenda does appear to have been shelved on such sensitive issues as minority rights, the Kurdish issue and, most contentious of all, Cyprus.

    Staff at the EU information centre in the heart of European Istanbul say public interest in the accession process has also fallen away in recent months.

    The drop-in centre, piled high with glossy brochures, now deals with just 20 enquiries on an average day, mostly from students seeking advice on study grants.

    One day last week, two men had come to discover how EU standards would affect their textile business. In the background, a third visitor tapped away on a computer.

    "I come in regularly to check how the talks are going," Sevket Tuci explained, clearly an EU fan. He declared himself as frustrated as Brussels that Turkey is slacking in its commitments.

    "As a nation we love leaving things to the last minute. It's like exams - we cram the night before, then get lazy again as soon as the date has passed. I think that's what has happened here."

    Losing faith

    But if the government is guilty of being distracted, many Turks save a good deal of blame for their failing EU-enthusiasm for Europe itself.

    Even the children on a school field-trip to the EU centre sense the problem.


    The Cyprus issue is hanging like the sword of Damocles over Turkey's EU accession process
    Cengiz Aktar
    Professor of European Studies
    "I want Turkey to join the EU so that if something bad happens with a non-EU country, they can stand beside us," says 12-year-old Melis.

    "But I don't think it will ever happen. I've heard not many countries want us there. It's not very nice not to be wanted."

    "Public opinion here is less and less believing in the successful outcome of these negotiations," explains Emre Gonen of Bilgi University.

    He links that to strong signals coming from some in Europe that Turkey should never be allowed to join the club. Those signals are reinforced by the fact that Turkey is the only candidate country with no firm date for accession.

    "That is extremely dangerous," says Emre Gonen. "Negotiations are aimed at membership. If that aim is debated daily, it leaves little room for passion on the part of the candidate country."

    Drift

    A lecture from Brussels seems unlikely to reignite Turkish passions for the EU.

    But supporters hope it will act as a wake-up call for the government - while warning of a major dispute still looming on the horizon.

    "The Cyprus issue is hanging like the sword of Damocles over Turkey's EU accession process," says Cengiz Aktar.

    The EU says Ankara must honour its commitment to open its ports and airports to Greek Cypriot traffic by the end of this year. Turkey refuses unless the EU lifts the isolation of northern Cyprus.

    "The only way to bypass this is to work hard for harmonisation with the EU, so Brussels realises Turkey is serious and it can't call the whole thing off over Cyprus," Cengiz Aktar argues.

    "If Turkey can't do that it may all collapse. Then we will drift away from Europe and the West. That is definitely a possibility."

    Leave a comment:


  • kerkuk_kurdista
    replied
    Originally posted by NickyMartin
    I even can't laugh you.
    These kind of hate posts creates the possibility of new genocides...
    Such post is enough to commit another genocide?
    I guess his words are true after all.....

    Leave a comment:


  • Gallipoli
    replied
    Why does this forum have to do deal with people have such moronic wishes?


    Originally posted by Jacob
    I want all nations block the membership of turkey.

    turkey cannot be a member of european union because they dont belong to there.They belong to asia send them to asia.Asia minor smyrna constantinopole all are stolen lands from armenains and greeks.

    I want all european nations realize what kind of a xxxx turkey is. if you accept turkey to eu they xxxxs out your continent.

    turks hate every nation.They only loves themselfs.Turks cannot live any body.They kill animals they have no mercy.Never trust them.

    Leave a comment:


  • RUDO
    replied
    Jacob,can you tell me a nation which is perfect???

    I know the answer.

    But it is better to wait for your respond.

    By the way,do you know anyone who is perfect???(Don't say legendary men)

    Finally,are you perfect???(Upppss,personal question.Soorry!!!)

    Leave a comment:


  • NickyMartin
    replied
    Originally posted by Jacob
    I want all nations block the membership of turkey.

    turkey cannot be a member of european union because they dont belong to there.They belong to asia send them to asia.Asia minor smyrna constantinopole all are stolen lands from armenains and greeks.

    I want all european nations realize what kind of a xxxx turkey is. if you accept turkey to eu they xxxxs out your continent.

    turks hate every nation.They only loves themselfs.Turks cannot live any body.They kill animals they have no mercy.Never trust them.
    I even can't laugh you.
    These kind of hate posts creates the possibility of new genocides...

    Leave a comment:


  • hitite
    replied
    Originally posted by Jacob
    They kill animals they have no mercy...
    ... a prerequisite for a good shish kebab.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kharpert
    replied
    This makes no sense.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest started a topic NO turkey IN EUROPE

    NO turkey IN EUROPE

    I want all nations block the membership of turkey.

    turkey cannot be a member of european union because they dont belong to there.They belong to asia send them to asia.Asia minor smyrna constantinopole all are stolen lands from armenains and greeks.

    I want all european nations realize what kind of a xxxx turkey is. if you accept turkey to eu they xxxxs out your continent.

    turks hate every nation.They only loves themselfs.Turks cannot live any body.They kill animals they have no mercy.Never trust them.
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