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Names of 12,211 Villages Were Changed in Turkey

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  • #21
    Re: Names of 12,211 Villages Were Changed in Turkey

    Damn, I forgot Bells wrote the definition the first time. But still, it be nice if he described in detail why Gavur was wrong "as usual"!
    THE ROAD TO FREEDOM AND JUSTICE IS A LONG ONE!

    Comment


    • #22
      Re: Names of 12,211 Villages Were Changed in Turkey

      Originally posted by Saco View Post
      Damn, I forgot Bells wrote the definition the first time. But still, it be nice if he described in detail why Gavur was wrong "as usual"!
      that's up to the fur-baller juggler
      Sardarabad,1918.

      Comment


      • #23
        Re: Names of 12,211 Villages Were Changed in Turkey

        White genocide is a term used by armos to describe what everyone else calls cultural genocide. Cultural genocide happens through assimilation, almost always forced.
        Due to budget cuts the light at the end of the tunnel has been turned off.

        Comment


        • #24
          Re: Names of 12,211 Villages Were Changed in Turkey

          I know what cultural genocide is. I was a bit confused with the term White Genocide though at first.
          THE ROAD TO FREEDOM AND JUSTICE IS A LONG ONE!

          Comment


          • #25
            Re: Names of 12,211 Villages Were Changed in Turkey

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_Genocide
            Azerbaboon: 9.000 Google hits and counting!

            Comment


            • #26
              Re: Names of 12,211 Villages Were Changed in Turkey

              Thanks Fed.
              THE ROAD TO FREEDOM AND JUSTICE IS A LONG ONE!

              Comment


              • #27
                Re: Names of 12,211 Villages Were Changed in Turkey


                Reuters
                Men chat in an open-air cafe in the Kurdish dominated city of Diyarbakir, southeastern Turkey, earlier this month. In a groundbreaking gesture, the government decided to restore the name of a Kurdish village.


                Turkey renames Kurdish village as part of reforms

                By Ibon Villelabeitia - Reuters

                Friday August 21, 2009

                Erdogan government also considers allowing sermons in minority language

                ANKARA – Turkey has begun restoring names of Kurdish villages and is considering allowing religious sermons to be made in Kurdish as part of reforms to answer the grievances of the ethnic minority and advance its EU candidacy.

                Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has said his government will push democratic reforms to address decades-old grievances from the Kurdish population and help end a 25-year conflict between the state and separatist guerrillas.

                Erdogan, who has given few details on the measures and their time frame, is seeking public, military and parliamentary support for his “Kurdish initiative,” aimed at persuading Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) rebels to lay down arms and end an insurgency that has killed some 40,000 people.

                The conflict has long hampered Ankara’s European Union membership bid and weighed on the local economy.

                Analysts say some of the expected measures will require difficult legal and constitutional reforms for which Erdogan needs broad consensus, but the main opposition parties have rejected a call for talks, arguing the process threatened Turkey’s unity.

                Turkey’s estimated 12 million Kurds out of a population of 72 million have long complained of discrimination by the state.

                Erdogan’s Islamist-rooted Justice and Development Party (AKP), which first came to power in 2002, has taken some steps to expand political and cultural rights for Kurds, partly under pressure from the EU.

                The Haberturk daily said the provincial council of Diyarbakir in the mainly Kurdish southeast had restored the old Kurdish name to a hamlet and the state-appointed provincial governor had not objected.

                The governor had challenged similar moves by the council in court in the past.

                Positive development

                Villagers had applied to the council for it to accept the name Celkaniya for their settlement in place of the Turkish name Kirkpinar.

                The council is dominated by the pro-Kurdish Democratic Society Party (DTP).

                “This is a very positive development. We are still in shock. The government’s democratic initiative project is bearing fruit for the first time in Diyarbakir,” the paper quoted council chairman Sehmus Bayhan, from the DTP, as saying.

                More than 12,000 village names, some 35 percent of the total, were changed in Turkey between 1940 and 2000 under a “Turkification” drive, according to a report by the Milliyet daily.

                The name change initiative, dating back to the Ottoman era before World War One, was also designed to give Turkish names to places with Armenian, Greek and Bulgarian names, it said.

                The Hurriyet newspaper reported Interior Minister Besir Atalay, who has been holding talks with political parties, business groups and Turkey’s generals on the “Kurdish initiative,” as saying he would discuss with the country’s religious authorities the possibility of sermons being made in Kurdish.

                Under the plan, sermons in the main cities in the southeast will remain in Turkish but in villages where the population is completely Kurdish, preachers will be allowed to choose whether they conduct sermons in Turkish or Kurdish.

                Erdogan was scheduled to chair a national security meeting later yesterday to discuss the Kurdish reforms with ministers and the country’s top commander, General Ilker Basbug.

                The jailed guerrilla leader of the PKK, Abdullah Ocalan, had been expected last weekend to issue a “road map” of his own on how to resolve the conflict, but this has been delayed.

                Source

                Comment


                • #28
                  Re: Names of 12,211 Villages Were Changed in Turkey

                  Originally posted by Alexandros View Post

                  Reuters
                  Men chat in an open-air cafe in the Kurdish dominated city of Diyarbakir, southeastern Turkey, earlier this month. In a groundbreaking gesture, the government decided to restore the name of a Kurdish village.


                  Turkey renames Kurdish village as part of reforms

                  By Ibon Villelabeitia - Reuters

                  Friday August 21, 2009

                  Erdogan government also considers allowing sermons in minority language

                  ANKARA – Turkey has begun restoring names of Kurdish villages and is considering allowing religious sermons to be made in Kurdish as part of reforms to answer the grievances of the ethnic minority and advance its EU candidacy.

                  Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has said his government will push democratic reforms to address decades-old grievances from the Kurdish population and help end a 25-year conflict between the state and separatist guerrillas.

                  Erdogan, who has given few details on the measures and their time frame, is seeking public, military and parliamentary support for his “Kurdish initiative,” aimed at persuading Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) rebels to lay down arms and end an insurgency that has killed some 40,000 people.

                  The conflict has long hampered Ankara’s European Union membership bid and weighed on the local economy.

                  Analysts say some of the expected measures will require difficult legal and constitutional reforms for which Erdogan needs broad consensus, but the main opposition parties have rejected a call for talks, arguing the process threatened Turkey’s unity.

                  Turkey’s estimated 12 million Kurds out of a population of 72 million have long complained of discrimination by the state.

                  Erdogan’s Islamist-rooted Justice and Development Party (AKP), which first came to power in 2002, has taken some steps to expand political and cultural rights for Kurds, partly under pressure from the EU.

                  The Haberturk daily said the provincial council of Diyarbakir in the mainly Kurdish southeast had restored the old Kurdish name to a hamlet and the state-appointed provincial governor had not objected.

                  The governor had challenged similar moves by the council in court in the past.

                  Positive development

                  Villagers had applied to the council for it to accept the name Celkaniya for their settlement in place of the Turkish name Kirkpinar.

                  The council is dominated by the pro-Kurdish Democratic Society Party (DTP).

                  “This is a very positive development. We are still in shock. The government’s democratic initiative project is bearing fruit for the first time in Diyarbakir,” the paper quoted council chairman Sehmus Bayhan, from the DTP, as saying.

                  More than 12,000 village names, some 35 percent of the total, were changed in Turkey between 1940 and 2000 under a “Turkification” drive, according to a report by the Milliyet daily.

                  The name change initiative, dating back to the Ottoman era before World War One, was also designed to give Turkish names to places with Armenian, Greek and Bulgarian names, it said.

                  The Hurriyet newspaper reported Interior Minister Besir Atalay, who has been holding talks with political parties, business groups and Turkey’s generals on the “Kurdish initiative,” as saying he would discuss with the country’s religious authorities the possibility of sermons being made in Kurdish.

                  Under the plan, sermons in the main cities in the southeast will remain in Turkish but in villages where the population is completely Kurdish, preachers will be allowed to choose whether they conduct sermons in Turkish or Kurdish.

                  Erdogan was scheduled to chair a national security meeting later yesterday to discuss the Kurdish reforms with ministers and the country’s top commander, General Ilker Basbug.

                  The jailed guerrilla leader of the PKK, Abdullah Ocalan, had been expected last weekend to issue a “road map” of his own on how to resolve the conflict, but this has been delayed.

                  Source
                  Even if the AKP is losing support among Turks, this willl be compensated by more votes from the Kurdish region if this initiative works. Also, the TSK actually supports this reconciliation.

                  The only risk is that Kurdish reconciliation could futher Islamify Turkey, as Islam is the best way to win support among the Kurdish majority. Maybe Kurds will be fine with a Turkish national identity if they are allowed to keep their ethnic identity.

                  I bet this news really upsets those who wish Turkey to be split

                  Comment


                  • #29
                    Re: Names of 12,211 Villages Were Changed in Turkey

                    Not quite bad enough for an AfD, but bad enough for a major rewrite.
                    Plenipotentiary meow!

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