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Could Egypt inspire revolution in Azerbaijan?

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  • Armanen
    replied
    Re: Could Egypt inspire revolution in Azerbaijan?

    Originally posted by gegev View Post
    “Erkir Media” TV, in Armenia, showed March 11, 2011 Azerbaijan opposition rally in Baku, the police there outnumbered the demonstrators. Hundreds of policemen have been busy with beating and kicking demonstrators into the police cars to deliver them police stations.

    Ilham demonstrated his typical Sultan’s behavior. It is impossible to compare levels of democracy in Azerbaijan and Armenia, we are in a very preferable situation!
    Yep! So next time you hear an Armenian claim there are no freedoms in Armenia or that Serj is a dictator, smack them!

    Leave a comment:


  • gegev
    replied
    Re: Could Egypt inspire revolution in Azerbaijan?

    “Erkir Media” TV, in Armenia, showed March 11, 2011 Azerbaijan opposition rally in Baku, the police there outnumbered the demonstrators. Hundreds of policemen have been busy with beating and kicking demonstrators into the police cars to deliver them police stations.

    Ilham demonstrated his typical Sultan’s behavior. It is impossible to compare levels of democracy in Azerbaijan and Armenia, we are in a very preferable situation!
    Last edited by gegev; 03-11-2011, 07:14 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Armanen
    replied
    Re: Could Egypt inspire revolution in Azerbaijan?

    Originally posted by retro View Post
    Armenia, Russia and the Ukraine haven't transitioned properly towards parliamentary democracy and they are hardly very egalitarian societies. When power and wealth become centralised. It creates all sort of structural, socio-economic problems and what you don't want to end up living in is a corrupt, plutocratic society with a bloated public sector and little rule of law.

    Can only parliamentary democracies have egalitarian societies? In the US for example, the gap between rich and poor has been growing for the past 20 + years, and is only getting worse. The top 10% of US controls well over 90% of the wealth.

    Armenia is on an evolutionary process toward building a stronger and better state. However, it is far from being authoritarian, otherwise we wouldn't have nearly as much foreign agents of influence aka levon and raffi, running around the country trying to stir up trouble. Nor would Armenians enjoy freedom of speech. Armenia is one of the most stable and free of the post-Soviet states. And we need political evolution, not a western backed revolution!

    Leave a comment:


  • retro
    replied
    Re: Could Egypt inspire revolution in Azerbaijan?

    Originally posted by Armanen View Post
    Are you implying that Armenia is an authoritarian state?
    Armenia, Russia and the Ukraine haven't transitioned properly towards parliamentary democracy and they are hardly very egalitarian societies. When power and wealth become centralised. It creates all sort of structural, socio-economic problems and what you don't want to end up living in is a corrupt, plutocratic society with a bloated public sector and little rule of law.


    Mr. Tolosa pointed out two kinds of problems: structural problems Armenia had before, and problems that arose later. Low-rate improvement of business environment seriously affects the Armenian economy, Tolosa said.

    However, Mr. Kapinos was not at all satisfied with the IMF official`s answer. He asked one more question about the root of the problems. One of the foreign guests said that the problem may be the lack of democracy in Armenia or Armenia`s failing to reject Soviet standards.

    The IMF official said that Armenia will benefit from more balanced distribution of its resources.

    Finally, Mr. Kapinos decided to answer is own questions. "The problems stem from the system formed in 1990s, namely, oligopoly," he said. Oligopolies are unlikely to come to an end themselves, so there is a need for external interference. The current system makes Armenia dependent on transfers and import. Mr. Kapinos arrived at the following conclusion: only programs envisaging system management reforms will change the situation in the country.

    However, Mr. Tolosa did not like Mr. Kapinos` "revolutionary" appeals. There is no need for a revolution in Armenia, he said. The IMF is supporting the programs that will produce "evolutionary" results, Tolosa said. He reminded the participants of as rampant corruption in the United States in 1900s as it is in Armenia now.

    http://news.am/eng/news/50972.html

    Leave a comment:


  • londontsi
    replied
    Re: Could Egypt inspire revolution in Azerbaijan?

    Originally posted by KarotheGreat View Post
    Yes to bad that this isn't in our interest, as long as Alijev can stay in power and steal money for the state he will not start a war. No one can guarantee that the revolutionaries will be better than Alijev they could be nationalists that are ready to attack Armenia. So I as an Armenian support Alijev as Sultan of Azerbaijan.
    I rather agree with this.

    I wonder if Serge Sarkisyan could make an offer (off record !!), at one of the “get togethers”,
    not to do anything that will undermine his regime as long as he “barks but not bites”.

    They could even think of ways how to covertly support the regime in case of “difficulties”.

    It sounds like a win win situation.

    Leave a comment:


  • KarotheGreat
    replied
    Re: Could Egypt inspire revolution in Azerbaijan?

    Originally posted by gegev View Post
    Remember that Mutalibov supporters are still in Azerbaijan. Alievs can't stay in power that long, just because of barking at Armenians that loudly, things can be reversed during a week. Azeris are fed up with Ilham promises/barking and waiting until the Kharabakh issue is settled; they know that the Arthakh land is lost forever! Soon the Egyptian scenario will be staged there, too. The opposition is just waiting for a good "reason" to start. #11March is inevitable.
    Yes to bad that this isn't in our interest, as long as Alijev can stay in power and steal money for the state he will not start a war. No one can guarantee that the revolutionaries will be better than Alijev they could be nationalists that are ready to attack Armenia. So I as an Armenian support Alijev as Sultan of Azerbaijan.

    Leave a comment:


  • Christina
    replied
    Re: Could Egypt inspire revolution in Azerbaijan?

    In 1952 Egypt had it's glorious revolution. Sadat, Nassir, Salah Salem 'the dancing major" were the
    top celebrities. Om Kalsoum (you can spell her name many different versions)
    was the singer that was Nassir's favorite. He made sure his speeches
    on the radio always followed her singing. When all the citizens were listening.
    By the way, I am sure some here know this: her famous song became a
    unofficial anthem of Egyptians and in turn of other Arab nations as she toured
    doing her performances. Enta Omri is an example of one of her songs.
    She had many favorite songs, too many to mention here.
    On a song of hers,
    the mataphor of words went if I recall, words to the effect: Oh my hands that
    are bound behind me, oh that I wish they were free..."
    King Farouk was a corrupt ruler, (a branch of this family is originally cousins of the Turkish Ottoman
    rulers, but I assume everyone knows this!),
    the Egyptians did not like the British as they felt they were the real rulers.
    Sadat mentioned in his autobiography the way the British on motor bikes ran through his village
    Mit abel Kum, and how they treated the people.

    Well, the Free Officer's Movement met. They planned it all brilliantly.
    This is the most famous Revolution that never shed any blood.
    They set the example.
    They gave a 21 gun salut to King Farouk and his group.
    (he went to Europe, naturally).

    The military controlled everything in Egypt. Then Gamal Abdel Nassir became the
    ruler of Egypt. United Arab Republics. When he died there was a mass funeral
    of so many people, it was a quiet day.

    Then came Anwar el-Sadat. You know the story, I hardly need to go into his history as
    head of the nation.

    The military has always played a prominent role in Egyptian history.

    I am not surprised in their position in the recent events.

    I know someone will find a way to disagree with me.

    Read the books: Anwar el-Sadat Autobiography, Revolt On The Nile (I had the first edition, hard to get now, and
    like a dummy, I gave it away....oh....)
    I[I know that my spelling is off].
    Last edited by Christina; 03-11-2011, 12:41 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • gegev
    replied
    Re: Could Egypt inspire revolution in Azerbaijan?

    Remember that Mutalibov supporters are still in Azerbaijan. Alievs can't stay in power that long, just because of barking at Armenians that loudly, things can be reversed during a week. Azeris are fed up with Ilham promises/barking and waiting until the Kharabakh issue is settled; they know that the Arthakh land is lost forever! Soon the Egyptian scenario will be staged there, too. The opposition is just waiting for a good "reason" to start. #11March is inevitable.
    Last edited by gegev; 03-10-2011, 07:32 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Armanen
    replied
    Re: Could Egypt inspire revolution in Azerbaijan?

    Originally posted by retro View Post
    The problem with authoritarian type states is that they tend to be plagued by high level corruption. Unrepresentative government is not ideal and maybe the Armenian kettle shouldn't call the Azeris pot black.

    It's my understanding that the clerics in Azerbaijan are Iranics. Whilst some kind of Kurdish political class, lord over their "mentally challenged" Azeri slaves. Aliyev is a Kurd is he not?

    Are you implying that Armenia is an authoritarian state?

    Leave a comment:


  • retro
    replied
    Re: Could Egypt inspire revolution in Azerbaijan?

    Originally posted by Federate View Post
    Precisely why I want Azerbaijan to remain as authoritarian as possible.
    Whilst it's a mistake to go though life wishing ill upon your enemies. I see that Aliyev has been hobnobbing with other low life crooks.

    The president and Andrew are said to be ‘close friends’ and Prince Andrew is oficially known as ‘the dear guest’ on his visits to the country.

    A source told the Daily Mail: “They appear to have common interests and a shared sense of humour. Andrew is always laughing at Ilham’s jokes, which are usually about women.”

    Paul Flynn, a Labour backbench MP, said: ‘The Royal Family has no business cultivating friendships with someone who has a record of being a

    brutal autocrat. The dear friends of today can end up being the murderous dictators of tomorrow. Azerbaijan is a very primitive democracy that doesn’t recognise human rights.’ Meanwhile, Tory MP Andrew Rosindel defended the Duke of York.

    "Azerbaijan is an oil-rich country which we could do an enormous amount of trade with," he said. “The fact that the Duke of York has built up strong relations with the leaders is a jolly good thing. I commend him for it and I think all he is doing is right.

    “Azerbaijan is not a country with our standards of human rights but there are many countries like that that we trade with.”

    read more:

    http://www.tntmagazine.com/tnt-today...#ixzz1GFUObBcQ

    Leave a comment:

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