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Nagorno-Karabagh: Military Balance Between Armenia & Azerbaijan

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  • Re: Nagorno-Karabagh: Military Balance Between Armenia & Azerbaijan

    Originally posted by Hakob View Post
    We have a putsch allready in October 27 1999. That is when oligarchs took over a government that more or less had a national platform. Anybody thinking it was just s terror act is Making a mistake.
    At that time oligarchs that were spawned by Levon Ter Petrosian's ruling years just decapitated the leadership that was trying to implement controll over them.
    About military putsch. As soon as it happens it has to remove embedded chinovniks from power, pass new elections of parliament guaranteeing true voting. After that military has to change constitution allowing it to be the third guarantor of government power and protect itself from retribution or power leadership demolition in case oligarchs or some dominant party decides to prevent it from replacing government again.
    The whole thing should not take more than 8-12 months and then military has to step aside.
    Looking back at some banana republic's stories, this is the only method I see for change. Otherwise one corrupt government replaces another endlessly and nothing changes.
    But once this cycle is broken, there is a chance of bringing socio economic change.
    Banana republics do not have a 100 million bloodthirsty turks around the bend waiting to pounce. Any instability may lead to attack.
    Hayastan or Bust.

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    • Re: Nagorno-Karabagh: Military Balance Between Armenia & Azerbaijan

      Originally posted by Haykakan View Post
      Banana republics do not have a 100 million bloodthirsty turks around the bend waiting to pounce. Any instability may lead to attack.
      Haykakan Jan military take over is not comparable to political chaos which can happen if country continues deteriorating in the hands of current political entities. This continuation may lead to the worst scenario regarding our neighbors and us.
      Military take over may on the contrary, strengthen our defenses and national unity.
      I know, any putsch is a hard to swallow pill. But that may become the only choice.
      Armenia has 4 billion debt and growing. There may be a moment the country will become insolvent and austerity imposed by our creditors. That could lead to total collapse and flight out of Armenia.

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      • Re: Nagorno-Karabagh: Military Balance Between Armenia & Azerbaijan

        Առաջնագծի զինվորները





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        • Re: Nagorno-Karabagh: Military Balance Between Armenia & Azerbaijan

          Russian Forces in Armenia
          11.06.2016

          The Russian military involvement in assistance of the government of Syria had led to a sharp deterioration of relations between Russia and Turkey, which until recently had been seen as if not an ally then at least a solid partner. While the reasons for Turkish president Erdogan’s betrayal of trust with Russia are still not fully known, this unexpected turn of events had instantly elevated the importance of the Russian military contingent in Armenia, a country which is not only tied to Russia by a range of collective security treaties but also shares a long border with Turkey, which is after all a member of NATO, as well as with Azerbaijan and Georgia, both of which have been building their ties to NATO in recent years. Which means that Armenia is the Transcaucasus equivalent of Belarus–a buffer state between the suddenly hostile NATO and Russia. Any escalation of the Russia-NATO differences of opinion over the future of Syria would necessarily involve the Russian forces already stationed there, plus whatever reinforcements could be sent to the area. The presence of Russian forces in Armenia is also significant for the reason of the still unresolved Armenia-Azerbaijan conflict over the future of Nagorno-Karabakh. Given Armenia’s geographic importance and its political and military alignment with Russia through the Collective Security Treat Organization and the Eurasian Economic Union, one also has to keep in mind that Armenia represents a tempting “color revolution” target. For that reason, Russian troops stationed there can rightly consider themselves to be part of a frontline deployment.

          The permanent contingent of Russian forces in that country centers around the 102nd Military Base near the city of Gyumri, with Russian troops enjoying basing rights there thanks to a bilateral Russia-Armenia agreement until 2044. The 102nd Base was established on the basis of the 127th Motorized Rifle Division that was based in Gyumri. Its equipment strength includes 74 Main Battle Tanks, nearly 200 BTRs and BMPs, as well as artillery systems including long-range Smerch MRLs, which is equivalent to a reduced-strength motorized rifle division of three motorized rifle regiments (each with one tank company) plus a separate tank battalion, consistent with the number of 4500 Russian soldiers stationed at Gyumri. The 102nd is not the only such formation in existence–the 201st Military Base in Tajikistan that is intended to help maintain security in Central Asia also as part of the Collective Security Treaty Organization, has roughly similar organization and strength.

          However, while the 201st only needs to worry about Taliban, Al Qaeda, and, now also ISIS infiltration from Afghanistan, the 102nd is based in close proximity to a NATO state which necessitates protection against air attack. That protection is provided by the 988th Air Defense Missile Regiment with S-300 and Buk-M systems and a flight of MiG-29SMT fighters based at the nearby Erebuni airfield which recently also received 18 Mi-24 and Mi-8 helicopters. Rounding off the 13 thousand strong Russian contingent in Armenia are the 4.5 thousand FSB Border Guards based at Gyumri, Armavir, Artashat, and Megri.

          This force serves a number of peacetime functions. It extends Russian conventional deterrence umbrella over Armenia against any external attempts to violate Armenia’s sovereignty. It helps integrate Armenia into the CSTO, with Russian troops serving as military trainers and advisors in a fashion similar to the role their counterparts played in Syria. Indeed, Russian and Armenian forces hold frequent joint military exercises to hone their interoperability. Should the situation deteriorate, the 102nd’s organization and strength make it suitable to wage a low intensity counter-insurgency campaign against well organized “foreign fighters” and, in the event of a major military threat to Armenia, it is sufficiently powerful to screen Armenia’s borders until reinforcements could be sent, while bombarding key enemy sites with Iskander-M missiles. Even though Armenia does not share a border with Russia, it does have one with Iran, whose close security relationship with Russia shows no signs of weakening which means that, should the worst come to worst, Iranian airspace could be used to reinforce Armenia.

          Current Russian national security plans foresee the Russian force grouping in Armenia to be increased, as part of the overall enhancement of the role of CSTO in guaranteeing regional security and in response to increased NATO activity in the region. What happens next is really up to the West. Should it insist on continuing the course toward confrontation, Russian forces in Armenia could greatly complicate its strategic calculations.

          https://southfront.org/russia-defens...medium=twitter

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          • Re: Nagorno-Karabagh: Military Balance Between Armenia & Azerbaijan

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=llrFM9cXruQ

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            • Re: Nagorno-Karabagh: Military Balance Between Armenia & Azerbaijan

              Is it true Chinese made AK's were not working properly on the front?http://videochart.net/video/7k623.39...ref=yelaket.am

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              • Re: Nagorno-Karabagh: Military Balance Between Armenia & Azerbaijan

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                • Re: Nagorno-Karabagh: Military Balance Between Armenia & Azerbaijan

                  Originally posted by ASALA2116 View Post
                  Is it true Chinese made AK's were not working properly on the front?http://videochart.net/video/7k623.39...ref=yelaket.am
                  Chinese AK-47s are one of the best built......after Russia.

                  US made AKs are junk and the worst.

                  So why they were not functioning properly must be operator error.
                  B0zkurt Hunter

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                  • Re: Nagorno-Karabagh: Military Balance Between Armenia & Azerbaijan

                    Originally posted by armo12 View Post
                    Can anyone identify this AK variant? Looks like a modded ak-74m or an ak-12 or an as-300(made by aspar arms)
                    No variant......looks like Baba was in Artsakh.
                    B0zkurt Hunter

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                    • Re: Nagorno-Karabagh: Military Balance Between Armenia & Azerbaijan

                      Originally posted by ASALA2116 View Post
                      Is it true Chinese made AK's were not working properly on the front?http://videochart.net/video/7k623.39...ref=yelaket.am
                      The Armenian Armed Forces do not use the Type 56, which is visibly quite different from the standard AKM.

                      The Army uses the AKM and AK-74 like most post-Soviet states. Its BS, perhaps even propaganda.

                      Can anyone identify this AK variant? Looks like a modded ak-74m or an ak-12 or an as-300(made by aspar arms)
                      Its a modified AK-74M.
                      Last edited by Lori; 06-11-2016, 06:41 PM.

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