Announcement

Collapse

Forum Rules (Everyone Must Read!!!)

1] What you CAN NOT post.

You agree, through your use of this service, that you will not use this forum to post any material which is:
- abusive
- vulgar
- hateful
- harassing
- personal attacks
- obscene

You also may not:
- post images that are too large (max is 500*500px)
- post any copyrighted material unless the copyright is owned by you or cited properly.
- post in UPPER CASE, which is considered yelling
- post messages which insult the Armenians, Armenian culture, traditions, etc
- post racist or other intentionally insensitive material that insults or attacks another culture (including Turks)

The Ankap thread is excluded from the strict rules because that place is more relaxed and you can vent and engage in light insults and humor. Notice it's not a blank ticket, but just a place to vent. If you go into the Ankap thread, you enter at your own risk of being clowned on.
What you PROBABLY SHOULD NOT post...
Do not post information that you will regret putting out in public. This site comes up on Google, is cached, and all of that, so be aware of that as you post. Do not ask the staff to go through and delete things that you regret making available on the web for all to see because we will not do it. Think before you post!


2] Use descriptive subject lines & research your post. This means use the SEARCH.

This reduces the chances of double-posting and it also makes it easier for people to see what they do/don't want to read. Using the search function will identify existing threads on the topic so we do not have multiple threads on the same topic.

3] Keep the focus.

Each forum has a focus on a certain topic. Questions outside the scope of a certain forum will either be moved to the appropriate forum, closed, or simply be deleted. Please post your topic in the most appropriate forum. Users that keep doing this will be warned, then banned.

4] Behave as you would in a public location.

This forum is no different than a public place. Behave yourself and act like a decent human being (i.e. be respectful). If you're unable to do so, you're not welcome here and will be made to leave.

5] Respect the authority of moderators/admins.

Public discussions of moderator/admin actions are not allowed on the forum. It is also prohibited to protest moderator actions in titles, avatars, and signatures. If you don't like something that a moderator did, PM or email the moderator and try your best to resolve the problem or difference in private.

6] Promotion of sites or products is not permitted.

Advertisements are not allowed in this venue. No blatant advertising or solicitations of or for business is prohibited.
This includes, but not limited to, personal resumes and links to products or
services with which the poster is affiliated, whether or not a fee is charged
for the product or service. Spamming, in which a user posts the same message repeatedly, is also prohibited.

7] We retain the right to remove any posts and/or Members for any reason, without prior notice.


- PLEASE READ -

Members are welcome to read posts and though we encourage your active participation in the forum, it is not required. If you do participate by posting, however, we expect that on the whole you contribute something to the forum. This means that the bulk of your posts should not be in "fun" threads (e.g. Ankap, Keep & Kill, This or That, etc.). Further, while occasionally it is appropriate to simply voice your agreement or approval, not all of your posts should be of this variety: "LOL Member213!" "I agree."
If it is evident that a member is simply posting for the sake of posting, they will be removed.


8] These Rules & Guidelines may be amended at any time. (last update September 17, 2009)

If you believe an individual is repeatedly breaking the rules, please report to admin/moderator.
See more
See less

The List

Collapse
This is a sticky topic.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Joseph
    replied
    Re: The List



    http://www.turkishforum.com.tr/en/co...ian-hate-list/

    Leave a comment:


  • Alexandros
    replied
    Re: The List




    New ATC Chairman | Ambassador Richard L. Armitage

    October 30, 2009

    Mavi Boncuk

    AMERICAN-TURKISH COUNCIL ELECTS A NEW CHAIRMAN

    In recognition of the vital role outstanding leadership plays in the promotion of U.S.-Turkey relations, the Board of Directors of the American-Turkish Council today announced that retiring Chairman Brent Scowcroft will be succeeded as Chairman by Ambassador Richard L. Armitage, President of Armitage International. Ambassador Armitage will begin his service as Chairman, January 1, 2010.

    With the completion of his current term on December 31, 2009, Brent Scowcroft will have served nine years as Chairman of the Board of the American-Turkish Council.
    The Board of Directors and the Members of the American-Turkish Council take this opportunity to thank General Scowcroft for more than a half-century of personal commitment to a strong U.S.- Turkey relationship and particularly for his highly successful leadership of the American-Turkish Council. He will continue to be an active member of the ATC Board.

    Corporate members of ATC, both American and Turkish, welcome Ambassador Armitage and look forward to working with him to strengthen the business, defense, trade and investment, foreign policy and cultural relations between the United States and Turkey, two proven allies and friends. General Scowcroft and Ambassador Armitage will travel to Turkey November 16-20 for senior-level discussions with Turkey's government, military and business leadership. This timely visit will assure the smoothest possible transition for ATC.

    American-Turkish Council, 1111 14th St NW, Ste 1050, Washington, DC 20005 | ph 202.783.0483 | fax 202.783.0511

    BIOGRAPHY OF AMBASSADOR RICHARD L. ARMITAGE

    Richard L. Armitage has been President of Armitage International since 2005, continuing a more than 40-year career of alternating private practice and government

    From 1993 until March 2001, Mr. Armitage was President of Armitage Associates L.C. In 1992 and 1993, Ambassador Armitage directed U.S. assistance to the Newly Independent States (NIS) of the former Soviet Union. From 1989 until early 1992, Mr. Armitage filled key diplomatic positions as Presidential Special Negotiator for the Philippines Military Bases Agreement and Special Mediator for Water in the Middle East. President George H. W. Bush sent him as a Special Embassy to Jordan's King Hussein during the 1991 Gulf War. In the Pentagon from June 1983 to May 1989, he served as Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs.

    In May 1975, Mr. Armitage came to Washington as a Pentagon consultant and was posted in Tehran, Iran, until November 1976. Following two years in the private sector, he took the position of Administrative Assistant to Senator Robert Dole of Kansas in 1978. In the 1980 Reagan campaign, Mr. Armitage was senior advisor to the Interim Foreign Policy Advisory Board, which prepared the President-Elect for major international policy issues confronting the new administration. From 1981 until June 1983, Mr. Armitage was Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for East Asia and Pacific Affairs in the Office of the Secretary of Defense.

    Born in 1945, Ambassador Armitage graduated in 1967 from the U.S. Naval Academy, where he was commissioned an Ensign in the U.S. Navy. He served on a destroyer stationed on the Vietnam gun line and subsequently completed three combat tours with the Mobile Riverine Advisory Forces in Vietnam. Fluent in Vietnamese, Mr. Armitage left active duty in 1973 and joined the U.S. Defense Attaché Office, Saigon. Immediately prior to the fall of Saigon, he organized and led the removal of Vietnamese naval assets and personnel from the country.

    Mr. Armitage currently serves on the Board of Directors of ConocoPhillips, ManTech International Corporation and Transcu Ltd. He is a member of The American Academy of Diplomacy as well as a member of the Board of Trustees of the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS). He was awarded the Department of State Distinguished Service Award, is a four-time recipient of the Department of Defense Medal for Distinguished Public Service, the Secretary of Defense Medal for Outstanding Public Service, the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs Award for Outstanding Public Service, the Presidential Citizens Medal, and the Department of State Distinguished Honor Award. He has received decorations from the governments of Russia, Thailand, Republic of Korea, Bahrain, and Pakistan, and he was awarded a KBE and became a Knight Commander of the Order of St. Michael and St. George in 2005.

    Link

    Leave a comment:


  • Hellektor
    replied
    Re: The List

    Add Barack Hussein Obama, the spineless, shameless, lying scumbag of a politician to the shit list.

    Not only he denied the Armenian Genocide despite his repeated solemn pledges before becoming US president, but his total anti-Armenian/pro-Turk policy and that in about 100 days after his inauguration has shown his real face behind the smiling mask, which is even uglier than that of Clinton and Bush (Dumbfuck Retard the Second) put together.

    Leave a comment:


  • Alexandros
    replied
    Originally posted by Joseph View Post
    AMERICAN JEWISH OFFICIAL RETIRES AFTER LONG ANTI-ARMENIAN CAMPAIGN
    Barry Jacobs, Director of Strategic Studies at the American Jewish Committee (AJC), is retiring from his organization at the end of October. The "good news" was confirmed by an AJC official. The reason I characterize Jacobs' departure as "good news" is that he has been at the forefront of AJC's attempts over the years to undermine the adoption of various congressional resolutions on the .

    Several months ago, I wrote a column calling for Jacobs' dismissal from AJC because of his long-standing anti-Armenian efforts. Although I am sure that my column had no bearing on his departure, I am pleased that he will not be around any longer to carry out the Turkish government's denialist directives

    I had called for Jacobs' dismissal after his infamous public confrontation with Aram Hamparian, the Executive Director of the Armenian National Committee of America (ANCA), on February 21, in Washington, D.C. On that occasion, Jacobs had declared: "We are not historians, which is a polite, bullxxxx way of saying we're not going to take responsibility, we are not going to make a decision on 1915. ...The bilateral relationship between the United States and Turkey will suffer greatly if this [] resolution is passed. The Jewish community believed that also, and that's been our position. And the world is not made up of choices between good and bad, at least not in the Foreign Service when I was in it; it's made up between choices between bad and worse. So we take practical positions, and the position of all the Jewish organizations, including ADL, was not to have a position on the facts of what happened, or not taking a public position on what happened in 1915, we did not think, do not think, that the United States Congress is the place to settle this. And that's all I can tell you. And that's the real world and that's the position of United States Government and of the Government of Israel."

    For over 10 years, with the full blessing of his bosses, Jacobs aggressively campaigned to subvert all efforts to bring about the acknowledgment of the by the U.S. Congress. In an interview published by the Turkish Daily News on July 29, 1999, he pledged that Jewish organizations would "take an active and vigorous role in being friends of Turkey in the United States.... We will champion to the best of our ability Turkish interests in the U.S. Congress. We will be Turkey's friends officially in Congress" and work to help get favorable legislation passed, he said.

    Speaking more like a paid lobbyist than the representative of a human rights organization, Jacobs shamelessly declared: "We want to work with your [Turkish] Embassy in Washington, the Turkish-American community and Turkey's many friends and win our battles on Capitol Hill. We want the American people and our leaders to understand what Turkey and its citizens have accomplished. We want our media to accurately reflect Turkey's importance and achievements. We don't want those who are not friends of Turkey to have the means to use human rights or other issues against your interests."

    Jacobs acknowledged that AJC's extensive support for Turkey "brought us [Jewish organizations] into open conflict with Greek-Americans and Armenian-Americans. It has been welcomed by the Turkish government, but we have paid a price. The price has been that we have the Greek and Armenian-Americans very angry at us."

    Jacobs admitted that his excessively pro-Turkish position had even elicited complaints from many Jewish members of his own organization who asked: "Why are we supporting Turkey, which has a terrible human rights record?"

    I have no illusion that Jacobs' retirement would alter his organization's pro-Turkish agenda. Nevertheless, the departure of an official, who cultivated extensive contacts with Turkish denialists for more than a decade, would hopefully diminish the effectiveness of AJC's activities against Armenian issues. A similar situation would occur should Abraham Foxman, National Director of the Anti-Defamation League (ADL), leave his influential position at the ADL.

    While it is clear that the departure of a particular AJC or ADL official is not going to change the long-standing pro-Turkish policies of these organizations, it is equally important to recognize that in recent years closer contacts have been established between Armenian and Jewish American leaders and members of their respective communities.

    One would hope that those who replace Jacobs and Foxman would reassess their organizations' questionable stand on the and join the growing ranks of Jewish leaders who sympathize with the tragic history of the Armenian nation and resent being used as a tool to carry out Turkey's denialist policies.


    By Harut Sassounian, Publisher, The California Courier

    Interesting article Joseph.Thanks for posting!

    Leave a comment:


  • Joseph
    replied
    AMERICAN JEWISH OFFICIAL RETIRES AFTER LONG ANTI-ARMENIAN CAMPAIGN
    Barry Jacobs, Director of Strategic Studies at the American Jewish Committee (AJC), is retiring from his organization at the end of October. The "good news" was confirmed by an AJC official. The reason I characterize Jacobs' departure as "good news" is that he has been at the forefront of AJC's attempts over the years to undermine the adoption of various congressional resolutions on the .

    Several months ago, I wrote a column calling for Jacobs' dismissal from AJC because of his long-standing anti-Armenian efforts. Although I am sure that my column had no bearing on his departure, I am pleased that he will not be around any longer to carry out the Turkish government's denialist directives

    I had called for Jacobs' dismissal after his infamous public confrontation with Aram Hamparian, the Executive Director of the Armenian National Committee of America (ANCA), on February 21, in Washington, D.C. On that occasion, Jacobs had declared: "We are not historians, which is a polite, bullxxxx way of saying we're not going to take responsibility, we are not going to make a decision on 1915. ...The bilateral relationship between the United States and Turkey will suffer greatly if this [] resolution is passed. The Jewish community believed that also, and that's been our position. And the world is not made up of choices between good and bad, at least not in the Foreign Service when I was in it; it's made up between choices between bad and worse. So we take practical positions, and the position of all the Jewish organizations, including ADL, was not to have a position on the facts of what happened, or not taking a public position on what happened in 1915, we did not think, do not think, that the United States Congress is the place to settle this. And that's all I can tell you. And that's the real world and that's the position of United States Government and of the Government of Israel."

    For over 10 years, with the full blessing of his bosses, Jacobs aggressively campaigned to subvert all efforts to bring about the acknowledgment of the by the U.S. Congress. In an interview published by the Turkish Daily News on July 29, 1999, he pledged that Jewish organizations would "take an active and vigorous role in being friends of Turkey in the United States.... We will champion to the best of our ability Turkish interests in the U.S. Congress. We will be Turkey's friends officially in Congress" and work to help get favorable legislation passed, he said.

    Speaking more like a paid lobbyist than the representative of a human rights organization, Jacobs shamelessly declared: "We want to work with your [Turkish] Embassy in Washington, the Turkish-American community and Turkey's many friends and win our battles on Capitol Hill. We want the American people and our leaders to understand what Turkey and its citizens have accomplished. We want our media to accurately reflect Turkey's importance and achievements. We don't want those who are not friends of Turkey to have the means to use human rights or other issues against your interests."

    Jacobs acknowledged that AJC's extensive support for Turkey "brought us [Jewish organizations] into open conflict with Greek-Americans and Armenian-Americans. It has been welcomed by the Turkish government, but we have paid a price. The price has been that we have the Greek and Armenian-Americans very angry at us."

    Jacobs admitted that his excessively pro-Turkish position had even elicited complaints from many Jewish members of his own organization who asked: "Why are we supporting Turkey, which has a terrible human rights record?"

    I have no illusion that Jacobs' retirement would alter his organization's pro-Turkish agenda. Nevertheless, the departure of an official, who cultivated extensive contacts with Turkish denialists for more than a decade, would hopefully diminish the effectiveness of AJC's activities against Armenian issues. A similar situation would occur should Abraham Foxman, National Director of the Anti-Defamation League (ADL), leave his influential position at the ADL.

    While it is clear that the departure of a particular AJC or ADL official is not going to change the long-standing pro-Turkish policies of these organizations, it is equally important to recognize that in recent years closer contacts have been established between Armenian and Jewish American leaders and members of their respective communities.

    One would hope that those who replace Jacobs and Foxman would reassess their organizations' questionable stand on the and join the growing ranks of Jewish leaders who sympathize with the tragic history of the Armenian nation and resent being used as a tool to carry out Turkey's denialist policies.


    By Harut Sassounian, Publisher, The California Courier

    Leave a comment:


  • Joseph
    replied
    Though the US will continue to cowtow to Israel, neo-con groups such as JINSA are on their way out with the new administration.

    On the other hand, Armenia should approach Israel about buying arms to see how the Azeris react. Armenia has good ties with the US and also lives in that same unstable region. This would be symbolic and expose the Israeli position...hypocritical position.


    http://www.marketwatch.com/news/stor...6%7D&dist=hppr

    Support for Azerbaijan Defense Urged by JINSA
    Concern Expressed Over Armenian Organizational Leader's Opposition

    Last update: 5:13 p.m. EDT Oct. 17, 2008

    WASHINGTON, Oct 17, 2008 (BUSINESS WIRE) -- The Jewish Institute for National Security Affairs (JINSA) today expressed deep concern over those leaders of the Armenian Assembly of America who denounced a reported arms sale by Israel to Azerbaijan.
    "Azerbaijan is an important friend of the United States and is one of the few Muslim countries that maintains a positive relationship with Israel," said Tom Neumann, executive director of JINSA.
    "Azerbaijan is in an unstable region, made even more dangerous by Russia's invasion of Georgia last August," Neumann noted. "In light of all that is happening, the support of the U.S. -- and that of the entire free world -- is appropriate and necessary."
    The Jewish Institute for National Security Affairs is an independent, non-profit, non-partisan, non-sectarian educational organization established in 1976 to educate the public on national and international security issues, including the importance of an effective U.S. defense capability and the key role of strategic allies, including Israel, to promote democratic values in the Middle East.
    SOURCE: Jewish Institute for National Security Affairs (JINSA)
    JINSA
    Jim Colbert, 202-667-3900

    Leave a comment:


  • Joseph
    replied
    More on our friend from the TCA. Sounds like a former spook.

    http://www.turkishdailynews.com.tr/a...enewsid=117731



    Lincoln McCurdy - Fostering Turkish-American ties
    Saturday, October 18, 2008

    Lincoln McCurdy has been involved with Turkey since the late 1970s when he was at the US Consulate General in Istanbul. Today he is president of the Washington DC-based Turkish Coalition of America

    GÜL DEMİR and NIKI GAMM
    ISTANBUL – Turkish Daily News


    Some people who work in Turkey for the U.S. government fall in love with the country but most, however, are unwilling to risk their future by staying. Lincoln McCurdy is not one of them. He has been involved in U.S.-Turkish relations since the late 1970s. He told the Turkish Daily News, “I had served as the commercial officer at the U.S. Consulate General in Istanbul in the early 1980s, and when my assignment came to an end I resigned from government service to work in Turkey as a consultant for a major American bank.

    “When I returned to the US I was involved in establishing the American Turkish Council (ATC), a trade association that promoted commercial, defense and cultural relations between the United States and Turkey. I served as its first executive director and later as president. After leaving ATC, I was the senior advisor for the Turkish American Chamber of Commerce and Industry (TACCI) in New York for two years.

    “In 2006, I worked with several concerned Turkish Americans in exploring ways on how to encourage more Turkish Americans to become involved in the U.S. political system and to highlight the achievements of Turkish Americans. Consequently, due to the complexities of U.S. law, two new Turkish American organizations emerged in February 2007.

    The Turkish Coalition of America (TCA), for which McCurdy serves as president, was established as a charitable U.S. organization for the purpose of fostering a better understanding of the Turkish American community through public education. It is supported entirely by private donations with offices in Boston, Massachusetts, and Washington, DC.

    The second organization that was established is the Turkish Coalition USA Political Action Committee (TC-USA PAC) based in Washington, DC, for which McCurdy serves as treasurer. Its purposes is to fund raise in the Turkish American community in order to make financial contributions to political candidates on the federal, state and local levels who have an understanding of the importance of the U.S.-Turkish relationship.

    “Previously, unlike other ethnic communities in the U.S., there was no Turkish American political entity that represented the community in the US political arena. TC-USA PAC has filled this vacuum. Since its establishment, a second Turkish American political action committee, TurkishPAC, has been established in Houston, Texas—thereby providing another voice for the Turkish American community,” McCurdy said.

    He said TCA and TC-USA PAC were required by law to operate independently from each other since it is prohibited for an educational charitable organization such as TCA to be involved in political activities. Therefore, as an officer in both organizations, he was constantly careful to ensuring the independence of each organization.



    Turkey and US presidential candidates

    Asked about how the two main US presidential candidates viewed Turkey, McCurdy said they hadn't yet provided “a clear picture to the Turkish Americans, and the general American public, as to their vision for the future of relations with Turkey. However, Senator Obama, through statements, has endorsed the Armenian American position regarding the Armenian issue and the Nagorno-Karabagh issue. Senator McCain has not endorsed the Armenian American position. TCA has reached out to both presidential campaigns to request their positions on a number of issues of concern to Turkish Americans. We look forward to hearing from both Senator McCain and Senator Obama. As a legislator, Senator McCain has a pro-US –Turkish relations voting record.

    “Turkey's significance to peace in the region, particularly in regard to the war in Iraq and peace negotiations between Syria and Israel and Armenia and Azerbaijan cannot be overstated. It is clear that the 44th president of the United States will have to have a comprehensive policy towards Turkey. We hope that each of the candidates will realize the strategic and historical importance of US – Turkey relations.”

    McCurdy believes that in this election cycle the Turkish American community is finally beginning to flex its muscles. The Turkish American community has grown tremendously during the last 20 years. The number of Turkish Americans holding U.S. citizenship or permanent resident visas is estimated to range from 300,000 to 500,000. It is also a more affluent community than realized.

    “For the first time, political contributions by Turkish Americans to congressional, state and local candidates are being monitored due to the efforts of TC-USA PAC,” McCurdy said. “For this election cycle, Turkish Americans have organized more than 50 fundraisers for political candidates. As of today, Turkish Americans have raised more than $900,000 for congressional, state and local candidates. There is an excellent chance that Turkish Americans will have raised $1 million by the time of the election on Nov. 4. This amount does not reflect money contributed to the presidential candidates.

    “A strong vocal Turkish American community actively engaged in the U.S. political system will neutralize anti-Turkish rhetoric and will enhance the U.S.-Turkish relationship. Again, I want to say how privileged and honored I am to be involved in this movement of Turkish American empowerment through my work in the Turkish Coalition of America and the Turkish Coalition USA Political Action Committee.”

    One of the objectives of TCA is serving as a resource to the Congressional Turkish Caucus by encouraging more dialogue between caucus members, Turkish Americans and friends of the U.S.-Turkey partnership. McCurdy has found that many members are interested in learning more about Turkey and the partnership between the two countries. Since 2007 when TCA was founded the number of members in the caucus has reached 80, an increase of 18.

    “One interesting story that I would like to share with you is about the late Ahmet Ertegun. There is fascination on Capitol Hill about Mr. Ertegun, especially with members of the Congressional Black Caucus. Most people know that Mr. Ertegun was the founder of Atlantic Records, but few people realized that Ahmet was Turkish and played a key role in breaking down racial barriers in the nation's capital. In fact, in the 1940's when Ahmet's father was the Turkish ambassador to the U.S., the Turkish Embassy was the only official venue in Washington, DC, where blacks and whites could listen to music together. When this story is told, the perception of Turkey is changed for the good.”

    The TCA is not a lobbying group and it is proud of the broad range of programs it sponsors to foster understanding and build relationships between the Turkish American community and the general public, McCurdy said. Traditionally, the Turkish American community has not been engaged with their elected officials. As a result, there is a knowledge gap with many members of Congress regarding the concerns and the interest of Turkish Americans.

    “One of the missions of the TCA is to educate elected officials in order to close this gap. It is important to differentiate “lobbying” from “education.” Countless nonprofit organizations, like TCA, conduct education programs for members of congress.

    “Lobbying is defined when there is an effort to support or oppose specific legislation. As a non-profit charitable organization, TCA is permitted like other Turkish American organizations to undertake limited lobbying such as opposing the Armenian genocide resolution.”

    A normal day for Lincoln McCurdy may include meetings with members of congress and telephone calls most of the day talking with leaders of the Turkish American organizations and communities throughout the United States. For example, this year TCA is coordinating a national effort for Turkish American organizations to invite their representatives in congress to annual Turkish Republic Day events. This year is of particular importance since it is the 85th anniversary of the Turkish Republic.

    McCurdy said he is also very involved in building bridges between the Turkish American community and other ethnic communities. One of TCA's programs is offering scholarships to educate students about Turkish history and heritage, and to build ties between minority communities and Turkish Americans. In one outreach program, he had the opportunity to work with Mexican Red Cross officials. In May of this year, TCA made a contribution to the Mexican Red Cross for the purchase of two ambulances as a goodwill gesture for the relief assistance Mexico gave after the 1999 earthquake that hit Turkey.

    Another part of his job is working with colleagues and public relations consultants in drafting bulletins for members of Congress, press releases and op-eds reflecting the Turkish perspective of important and sometimes controversial issues.



    McCurdy on McCurdy

    McCurdy said he feels privileged and honored in helping to empower the Turkish American community. “Turkish Americans are model immigrants and play a constructive role in American society,” he said. “Unlike other ethnic groups, Turkish Americans do not have an anti-whatever agenda. They understand the importance of U.S. national interests. Unfortunately, however, Turkish Americans as a group are not politically involved. Whether they like it or not, Turkish Americans carry a responsibility to ensure that the dialogue between the United States and Turkey is not negatively impacted by interest groups hostile to Turkey. Therefore, it is important that Turkish Americans educate other Americans about their perspective, especially in the political arena. Otherwise the vital relationship between the United States and Turkey could be seriously damaged.

    “Regarding the political scene, there are only two Turkish Americans who have been elected to office – both on the local level. No Turkish American has yet to be elected to national office. This year only one Turkish American is running for public office. It's been enjoyable to rally support across the United States for Rifat Sivisoglu who is running for the DuPage County Board in Illinois, outside of Chicago. Rifat has an excellent chance of winning.

    “My current work is also laying the foundation for a Turkish American to run for congress. When the first Turkish American, Oz Bengur, ran a few years ago, he didn't have the support of any national Turkish American political organization. Now, there are two national Turkish American political action committees that can help in fundraising for the next Turkish American congressional candidate. I predict we will have a Turkish American member of congress in five years.

    “I enjoy very much supporting the future leaders of the Turkish American community. Each year TCA gives out some 20 scholarships to Turkish American students who are interested in pursuing a career in public affairs or in journalism. It's very uplifting to associate with such talented young people.”

    Asked what he saw as not very enjoyable about his work, McCurdy replied, “Regarding the negative side, it is disheartening to have to counter claims against Turkey from groups that have an anti-Turkish agenda based on hatred and viciousness. It is foolish and dangerous to attempt to re-fight old wars, particularly World War I. I wish we could create an atmosphere of goodwill and understanding with the anti-Turkish elements in the United States so that differences can be resolved and there can be focus on building a better future for all people. I know that Turkish Americans are willing to do so, but extremists in the anti-Turkish camp, unfortunately, refuse to deviate from their agenda.”

    Leave a comment:


  • Joseph
    replied
    Originally posted by Cthulhu View Post
    Gotcha. So that's why my first post was removed.
    Exactly. Not much we can do about them but we try to carry on with our task of collecting evidence, articles, etc.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cthulhu
    replied
    Originally posted by Zane View Post
    In a published letter to the economist. "Dr." Norman Stone, states that the bulk of specialist of the Ottoman Empire in 1915 deny there was ever a genocide.
    Is it strange at all that most of the Ottoman Empire "specialists" are from Turkey?

    Leave a comment:


  • Cthulhu
    replied
    Originally posted by Joseph View Post
    We prefer not to advertise them.
    Gotcha. So that's why my first post was removed.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X