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Armenian Georgian Relations

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  • #31
    Re: Armenian Georgian Relations

    georgia will side with anybody that is strong and will protect them since they have the weakest military in the area (ya Armenia's army would crush Georgria's) anyway, we also fought against the Geogrians during the Abkasia war where we sided with the Abkasians. Our relationship with Georgria right is stable but not very loving
    Մեկ Ազգ, Մեկ Մշակույթ
    ---
    "Western Assimilation is the greatest threat to the Armenian nation since the Armenian Genocide."

    Comment


    • #32
      Re: Armenian Georgian Relations

      Originally posted by Mos View Post
      georgia will side with anybody that is strong and will protect them since they have the weakest military in the area (ya Armenia's army would crush Georgria's) anyway, we also fought against the Geogrians during the Abkasia war where we sided with the Abkasians. Our relationship with Georgria right is stable but not very loving
      They are the ally's of our enemys, if we go to war with the azeris they'll stab us in the back so fast we don't know what hit us so we don't need them we need to libarate Abkasia and make it back a hay terretorie


      Karo
      You should never argue with idiots because they will just drag you down to their level....then beat you with experience!!!!!!!

      "I disagree with what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it" Voltaire

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      • #33
        Re: Armenian Georgian Relations

        Turkey and Georgia are the parties interested in weakening of the Armenian influence in Javakh

        The return of the Meskhetian Turks becomes a problem threatening Armenia's security, for the Turkish ring is almost getting tightened around Armenia. In its first reading the Georgian Parliament passed the bill about the repatriation of Meskhetians (Meskhs), having lived in the South of Georgia and having been resettled in the republics of the Middle Asia in the middle of last century. Georgia starts to realize one of its major responsibilities to Council of Europe. According to these responsibilities the Meskhetian Turks are supposed to be completely repatriated by 2016.

        /PanARMENIAN.Net/ According to the bill those who are eager to return to Georgia must submit the relevant documents to the Embassy of Georgia in the countries of their current residence by January 1, 2009. The would-be citizen of Georgia is obliged to reject the citizenship of any other country, as well as to pass a test on the knowledge of the Georgian Language, History and Constitution.

        Today there are only 700 Meskhs living in Georgia. According to some assessments, the overall Meskhi population living on the territory of former USSR is about 260-280 people, and from 300.000 up to 750.000 living around the whole world. The origins of the Meskhetian Turks are extremely complicated and have two principle versions existing. According to the first - pro Turkish version, the 80% of them are descendant of ethnic Turks, and the 20% are descendants of native Georgians and Armenians (the Hamshenis; also known as Khemshils), who have adopted Islam in XVII-XVIII centuries and have changed their language. There is also the pro-Georgian version, which says that most of the Meskhetian Turks are descendants of Meskhetian Georgians, with a little touch of ethnic Turks and Azerbaijanis, as well as Armenian speaking Khemshils. The territory of historical Meskheti corresponds with the three regions in Georgia - the region of Adigeni, Akhaltsikhe, and Aspindza, included in the region of Samtskhe-Javakheti, and with a certain region in Turkey. A small group of Meskhetians lived in the East of Ajaria and the North-East of the modern Turkey.

        For the Armenians of Javakh the law on repatriation of the Meskhs is a reasonable threat and is fraught with rather negative outcomes. And though the speaker of the Georgian Parliament Nino Burjanadze assures that the repatriates will be settled around the whole territory of Georgia, a part of them, and most likely the largest part, will be settled in Javakh, and this is of great interest first of all to Turkey and Azerbaijan.

        If the Meskhetians (Meskhs) are settled in Akhaltsikhe, the demographic situation, which will be in Ankara's hands, will change very soon. In Turkey the number of Meskhetian Turks who are willing to return is rather large, and the presence of the very Meskhetian Turks will allow Turkey to hold the power over the region. Moreover, Samtskhe-Javakheti province of Georgia is strategically of great significance to Turkey, and according to one of the scenarios allocation of Turkish military base instead of the Russian one is anticipated. The Armenians from Javakh cannot stay indifferent towards the issue, as they are well-aware of what such neighborhood may lead to. It shouldn't be forgotten that Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan oil pipeline and Baku-Tbilisi-Erzrum gas pipeline go through Javakh, and Kars-Tbilisi-Baku railroad construction is also supposed to be carried out here. In this regard it is better to have a more obedient and quiet nation living by, than the Armenians and even the Georgians on this territory. It should particularly be underlined that in this issue Turkey's and Georgia's opinions somehow coincide with each other, as both countries are the parties interested in weakening of the Armenian influence in Samtskhe-Javakheti.

        However, Georgia doesn't hurry to resettle the Meskhetian Turks in this region. Tbilisi's approach stands out with the fact that first of all Meskhetians are regarded as Turkicized Georgians, which serves as an attempt to ovoid the issue of the national minorities, which later may lead to big problems. Besides Tbilisi tries to settle the Meskhs all over the country and not concentrate them in the regions bordering on Turkey. In some sense it may be noted that here Yerevan and Tbilisi are of common opinion, but the whole question is how long Georgia will be able to resist the pressure form the West and Turkey; most probably not too long. The truth is however that perhaps when Saakashvili leaves the situation will change, but hardly to the better for the Armenian party, if not to the worse. The return of the Meskhetian Turks becomes a problem threatening Armenia's security, for the Turkish ring is almost getting tightened around Armenia.
        «PanARMENIAN.Net» analytical department

        Source: http://www.panarmenian.net/details/eng/?nid=772
        Մեր ժողովուրդն արանց հայրենասիրութեան այն է, ինչ որ մի մարմին' առանց հոգու:

        Նժդեհ


        Please visit me at my Heralding the Rise of Russia blog: http://theriseofrussia.blogspot.com/

        Comment


        • #34
          Re: Armenian Georgian Relations

          Georgian press: Dashnaks transfer Armenians from Armenia, Nagorno Karabakh, Russia, Syria and Iran in Javakhetia

          “Armenians living ion Javakhetia have recently started to falsify Georgia’s history. Armenian separatists of Samtskhe-Javakhetia, especially pro-dashnaksutyun organizations VIRK, Arshyalus, Parvana, Cavakhk, Unique Cavakhk introduce ancient Georgian territory Javakhetiya as a part of Great Armenia,” reads the article about Armenians actions connected with territorial claims in Georgia published in Palitra and New Seven Days newspapers, APA reports. Chief of Geyret party Alibala Asgarov told APA that the article written at the appeals of Georgian Young Patriots Union exposes separatist actions of Armenians. The article says that separatist organization Cavadkhkn National Freedom Movement makes aggressive statements addressing the state and Georgian people.

          “Armenian separatist strengthen anti-Georgian actions and transfer Armenians from Armenia, Nagorno Karabakh, Russia, Syria and Iran in the region of Ninosminda. Sectarian Russians living in the village of Gorelovka were obliged to leave the region due to the pressures of Armenian chauvinists. Armenian separatists have informal military units in the village of Gandza which pose threats to Georgia’s territorial integrity. Georgian leadership ignores all this since they have blood relations with Armenians, Georgians should prevent chauvinist spirit of Armenians,” the article says. Alibala Asgarov said that at the end of the article Georgian author mentions Armenians territorial claims against Azerbaijanis and come to the conclusion that Armenians are disgusting and betrayer.

          Source: http://en.apa.az/news.php?id=30823
          Մեր ժողովուրդն արանց հայրենասիրութեան այն է, ինչ որ մի մարմին' առանց հոգու:

          Նժդեհ


          Please visit me at my Heralding the Rise of Russia blog: http://theriseofrussia.blogspot.com/

          Comment


          • #35
            Re: Armenian Georgian Relations

            I'm all for normal relations with the Georgians but I do not trust the Georgians. You would think they would share a Christian camraderie but instead the side with the Turks for a few dollars. They should just do it an convert to Islam already. They constantly harrass Armenians and are testing their patience and they take that patience for granted but I can tell you that the Armenians in Javakh are preparing for a fight and I can tell you the Georgians will not win this fight.

            They are like our idiot, drunk cousins..although our relationship grows more distant by the day.

            If they move on Javakh they will f*ck themselves. If this happens, the Armenians, Abkhaz, Ossettes, will bury them.

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            • #36
              Re: Armenian Georgian Relations

              Ther existance it s our shadow, our dust,they are jalous, of everything that whe are, and that they would never be, georgia has allready 3 fronts, they want a 4 from the south??!!, and the azeri... the 80 years old country has teritorial claims too to georgia, that makes 5 front haha, I hope they know how to swim....i don t even talk about how they claim armenian churches to be georgian, by, erasing, letters and sybols, and living plain crosses on stone...the hell whit Georgians...

              Comment


              • #37
                Re: Armenian Georgian Relations

                Have you seen the Georgian flag?
                [July 9, 2007]

                On the morning of June 26 th all the residents of Akhalkalaki were asking each other the same question. “Have you seen the Georgian Flag?” By that morning the Georgian flag was already waving near the entrance of the 62 nd Russian military base located in Akhalkalaki, and at 7 AM the Georgian anthem could be heard under it.

                “For years the Russian flag was waving there. To our eyes the Russian flag was so usual and familiar that the change was very manifest. Those who hadn't seen it yet, were going out of their ways to see it,” told us Akhalkalaki resident Varduhi.

                On June 27 Georgia's Deputy Defense Minister Levan Nikoleishvili and the commander of the Group of Russian Forces in Transcaucasia Mayor-General Andrei Popov signed an Act of Handover and Acceptance regarding the Akhalkalaki military base's handover to Georgia. As stated by Nikoleishvili, all the military installations of the base have been transferred to Georgian military forces.

                The deadline for withdrawing of the Russian military base was July 1 st , while the process of handover and acceptance was to begin on June 25th.


                On June 25th Georgian servicemen arrived at the Akhalkalaki first military neighborhood. And from that day the neighborhood, the subordinate facilities and control of entrances were transferred to the Georgian armed forces. The Russian division commander's staff will abandon the military neighborhood on the last day of the deadline.

                In the town everyone knew that on the night of June 25 th fifty Georgian servicemen arrived in Akhalkalaki. We were unable to properly verify this information from their commanders, since the Georgian soldiers denied us entry into the headquarters. We tried to converse with the servicemen guarding the entrance but the answer to all of our questions was the same: “For the time being we don't have permission to say anything.” As to why the Georgian soldiers arrived at night, one soldiers replied that it was necessary. During our time near the entrance, three “KAMAZ” trucks were transporting soldiers into the military base. The military relocation into the Akhalkalaki military neighborhood is continuing.


                Pedestrian entry into the neighborhood is still allowed, but the entry of vehicles is under strict control. One of the residents of the military neighborhood told us: “I always entered with Russian authorization documents and had no problems, but just recently they didn't let me enter and told me that with Russian documents I have to stop my car outside and pass on foot.”

                The residents of the military neighborhood are both confused and nervous. The events taking place are giving way to various conversations and rumors about the future of their apartments. “We are all waiting to see what will happen. Some say that they will displace us so their soldiers are moved into our houses, others say that Georgian citizens can continue to live here while Russian citizens, especially those that were provided with apartments, will be moved out,” says Anahit, a resident of the neighborhood.


                “We don't know whom they will bring; they say that a special detachment will be brought in, so we are all afraid. Will we be comfortable with the Georgians? Will we get along with them? For many years already we have lived with the Russians. We have always lived peacefully alongside them and have not had any discord with them,” continues another resident Shogher.

                One June 30th the electricity supply of the military neighborhood was cut off. Those residents who want to have electricity must pay 20 lari (about $12) in cash to have their power turned on and linked with a personal bill.

                The 62 nd Russian military base operated a secondary school, a kindergarten, a music school, a military hospital, an officers' school, a clubhouse and other important facilities. These facilities, like the military base itself, employed many local Armenians. At this time all of those facilities are closed. Naturally the workplaces are also closed. For example, 300 students have been transferred from the military base's Russian school to the Vladimir Mayakovski Russian school in Akhalkalaki, while the future of the teaching staff is yet unclear. They have remained without work.

                To be continued

                Christine Aghalaryan
                Akhalkalaki

                www.hetq.am

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                • #38
                  Re: Armenian Georgian Relations

                  Javakhk web site. Very nice list of Maps of Armenians and Javakhk


                  http://travel.javakhk.net/general_maps.html

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Re: Armenian Georgian Relations

                    Georgians are just backstabbing nation we shouldnt have any relations with them
                    Մեկ Ազգ, Մեկ Մշակույթ
                    ---
                    "Western Assimilation is the greatest threat to the Armenian nation since the Armenian Genocide."

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Re: Armenian Georgian Relations

                      ARMENIAN CHURCHES COLLAPSING IN GEORGIA


                      There were more than 600 Armenian Apostolic Churches in Georgia and now their number has sharply gone down. Those that survived are in a miserable state : half-collapsing or near to that. The only functioning church of the Armenian Apostolic Church in Tbilisi is St. George church. Havlabar’s St. Echmiadzin is under reconstruction now, St. Georgia church priest, Ter-Narek Ghushchyan, told Panorama.am. Despite the fact that the Armenian Apostolic Church was established in Georgia 16 centuries ago, it has no legal status. “We act de facto but the state does not recognize us with respective regulations and rights,” Ter-Narek said.


                      Source: http://www.panorama.am/en/society/2007/07/31/ekexeci/
                      Last edited by Lucin; 08-05-2007, 02:42 AM.

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