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Armenian Georgian Relations

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  • #41
    Re: Armenian Georgian Relations

    Losing Voice: Languages policies threaten wellbeing of Armenians in Georgia

    It is difficult to find a single Armenian in Akhalkalak who would speak the state language, Georgian, and would use it in everyday life. This Armenian-populated city is in the Samtskhe Javakheti province of Georgia. It has a population of about 350,000, of whom 62 percent are ethnic Armenians. Armenians constitute an overwhelming majority, 95 percent, in the Akhalkalak region that includes 64 villages, of which only six are Georgian-populated. The environment in Akhalkalak is Armenian: the names of shops and main streets are Armenian. Even Georgians here speak Armenian. Vladimir, 70, can be considered as an ethnic minority representative in this Armenian-populated town. He is an ethnic Georgian, who besides his mother tongue also speaks Russian and Armenian. In perfect Armenian he tells of how Armenians and Georgians have lived in peace and without any serious problems and continue to live side by side without any problems today. During Soviet times when Russian was also used in Georgia, Georgian was not so much required for the Armenians of Javakhk.

    Armenians there received their education in their native language and in Russian. They used Russian to communicate with state institutions in Soviet Georgia. The teaching of the Georgian language in Armenian schools in Georgian territory was not on a due level and was among extra subjects. Head of the local authorities (sakrebulo) of the Akhalkalak region, Khachatur Ayvazyan, remembers that they preferred playing football to Georgian classes. Russian was pushed to the background after the collapse of the Soviet order and Georgian became the state language of the newly independent Georgian state. The Russian language continued to be used only among national minorities. By force of the old tradition, an Armenian who doesn’t know the state language, resorts to Russian to write an application to state structures. The native language is used in applications and notes sent to officials who are ethnic Armenians.

    “I don’t know how to quit this situation. A villager writes in Armenian. What can I do? How can I possibly refuse to accept his application,” Akhalkalak regional administration head (gangebeli) Artur Yeremyan says. The Armenian official’s knowledge of Georgian is on a domestic level. He communicates with government members in Russian, and often, as he himself says, he stays after meetings to once again discuss the decisions and resolutions written in Georgian and improve his knowledge of the state language. The officials of the region who are ethnic Armenians know only the rudiments of Georgian and can only greet someone in this language or have some conversation around the table. The local authorities in Akhalkalak have 32 deputies. Only seven of them are ethnic Georgians, and they speak Armenian as fluently as their Armenian colleagues. The meetings of the local elected representatives of the sakrebulo are held in breach of the Georgian legislation, in Armenian. “It is unlawful,” deputy, co-chairman of the unregistered “Virk” party David Rstakyan says about their meetings. Official resolutions and protocols in the administrative building of Akhalkalak’s sakrebulo are in Georgian, Armenian and Russian. The local ATV12 and Javakhk television companies in Akhalkalak also broadcast in Armenian. The “Akunk” newspaper is also published in Armenian.

    Goga Khachidze, the representative of the presidential administration in Samtskhe Javakheti, thinks that in the course of time ethnic minorities will learn the Georgian language. One has to have patience and wait. He refers to the efforts of the government through programs of teaching of Georgian to ethnic minorities that are often assisted by international organizations. One of the Georgian government programs is related to advanced studies of the Georgian language at school. The study of the state language in Armenian schools became strict only in recent years. Georgian is taught beginning from elementary school, but local authorities are not content with the quality of teaching yet. Akhaltskha resident Manushak Kiloyan is in the tenth grade of the local secondary school. She says that she knows Georgian, but her knowledge of Georgian does not satisfy her in order to continue studies in Georgia. Therefore, she has decided to continue her studies in Armenia. The insufficient qualify of specialists of Georgian, as well as the Armenian environment does not allow Armenian pupils to have a good command of Georgian so that they can apply to higher schools in Georgia instead of going to Armenia. “Ninety percent of high school graduates go to Armenia to continue their education,” Artur Yeremyan says. “This phenomenon means that Armenians abandon the area,” head of the “A-Info” public organization Khachatur Stepanyan says.

    The Georgian government has not met the requests of Javakhk Armenians for a joint Armenian-Georgian university to be opened in Akhalkalak. Instead, as Khachidze notes, next year the president has pledged to give an opportunity to 100 applicants to enter Georgia’s higher schools without the knowledge of Georgian. David Rstakyan and his supporters are dissatisfied with the Georgian government’s policy. “We don’t feel government care towards national minorities,” he says. The mistrust of Javakhk Armenians towards their own state even more deepened as a result of the latest reforms in the education system, when headmasters of Armenian schools were dismissed from their jobs with explanations that they do not know the state language. Only seven headmasters of local schools passed the Georgian language tests, of whom only one was Armenian and he was from a Georgian-populated village. The results of the language tests of Armenian schools’ headmasters convinced the Armenians of Javakhk that the government instead of integrating them had decided to achieve their assimilation. They see the only solution in giving the Armenian language the status of a regional language.

    The Armenians of Javakhk invoke the European framework convention on the protection of national minorities which was partially ratified by Georgia which proceeded from the existence of conflicts in its territory. Article 10 of the convention enables regions where representatives of national minorities traditionally live or live in sizable numbers to use their mother tongue if they wish both within their communities and at state institutions. Referring to the convention, the Armenians that constitute a majority in the Samtskhe Javakheti region demand that Armenian be given the status of a regional language. Local authorities in the Akhalkalak region have already made a decision to apply to the country’s president and parliament to make changes in the country’s basic law and make a provision there for Armenian as a language with a regional status. Their demand concerns not only Samtskhe Javakheti, but also to the Azeri populated Kvemo Kartli region. The local Armenians think finding a solution to this issue requires urgency and is even overdue.

    “If no regional status is given to the Armenian language, Javakhk will be gradually losing Armenians,” Stepanyan says. “After our language is given that status, 80 percent of local Armenians will spare no effort to learn Georgian,” representative of Akhalkalak’s “United Javakhk” Democratic Union Artur Poghosyan says. If the regional status is given to the Armenian language, the Armenians of Samtskhe Javakheti can use their mother tongue along with the state language in the places of their residence, receive education in Armenian and they will not be dismissed from their jobs because they do not know Georgian.

    Mels Torosyan, who is an economist by training, does not speak Georgian. During the Soviet times he worked as an economist in Akhalkalak, now he edits the “Akunk” newspaper and represents the Union of Public Organizations of Samtskhe Javakheti. Recently, there was a vacancy for an economist in Akhalkalak, which was not entrusted to the experienced economist because he does not know Georgian. “They brought a Georgian,” he complains and tries to show by his example the discriminative attitude of the government towards ethnic minorities. “The road is the best means to learn a language,” says representative of the presidential administration in Samtskhe Javakheti Goga Khachidze. Last year, the 200-kilometer-long road from the Georgian capital Tbilisi to Akhalkalak was almost impassable and could be overcome only within 5-6 hours. The Georgian government has completed the Tbilisi-Akhalkalak section due to the Millennium Challenge Corporation’s funding and promises to complete the construction of a 50-kilometer road linking Akhalkalak to Armenia. Georgian authorities, through Khachidze, consider it a childish thing to demand that Armenian be given the status of a regional language. They are patiently waiting for Armenians to learn Georgian, while Armenians say it will take them years to do that. In the meantime, Javakhk, locals say, will be losing its Armenian population.

    Source: http://armenianow.com/?action=viewAr...4&IID=&lng=eng
    Մեր ժողովուրդն արանց հայրենասիրութեան այն է, ինչ որ մի մարմին' առանց հոգու:

    Նժդեհ


    Please visit me at my Heralding the Rise of Russia blog: http://theriseofrussia.blogspot.com/

    Comment


    • #42
      Re: Armenian Georgian Relations

      Havlabar: Armenian community in Tbilisi pays the price of urbanization

      News of the construction of an elite district in Tbilisi was uneasily met by the Armenian Diaspora of Georgia. The new district is to be constructed in Havlabar, the hilltop of the city and the home for the majority of 150,000 Armenians of Tbilisi. Havlabar, the historical area of Armenian habitation in Georgia is called “Little Armenia on the hill.” Mostly covered by private houses Havlabar is well known for its “Italian yards”, when families from several houses share the one yard. Traditionally here lived the Armenian craftsman and traders and some houses still bear the signs in Armenian language of the people living there. Houses constructed by the richest and famous Armenian dynasties like Mantashov and Aramiants still stand in the district.

      Despite the assurance of the Georgian authorities that the Havlabar residents will be offered enough compensation for their houses some people both in Tbilisi and Armenia see serious political motives behind the construction. Many Armenians believe that the destruction of Havlabar is another step by the Georgian authorities toward the extirpation of the history of Armenians in Tbilisi. Three years ago the largest Georgian Orthodox Church Holy Trinity was constructed in Havlabar and now next to the church is being constructed a seminary in the area which used to be the oldest Armenian cemetery “Khojivank.” Arnold Stepanyan, the head of the “Tbilisi Community of Georgian Armenians” non governmental organization in Tbilisi says as the cemetery was considered by the Georgian authorities to be old no reburial was organized and a great number of skeletons appeared during digging the foundation ditch.

      “That was very insulting. The bones and gravestones, mostly Armenians were scattered all over the construction site. Only after Armenian organizations in Georgia interfered the gravestones have disappeared from the construction site during one night.” Stepanyan says the reconstruction of Havlabar was proposed by the president Mikhail Saakashvili personally and not recently. He says he saw the plan of reconstruction of Havlabar hang in the office of the president since he was elected. “Once I had a meeting with the president and saw the Havlabar master plan on the wall. I asked what this plan is and the president said that it would be a new business center of the city. When I asked where the Armenian population will move he changed the topic but then laughed off that the Armenian Diaspora will be financing the project.”

      Lamara Hambartsymyan’s family moved from Tbilisi to Yerevan 35 years ago, but her daughter Gayane got married and was back to Tbilisi. Now Gayane lives in Havlabar, in a house bequeathed by her grandmother. “We all worry what will be next,” says Lamara, “and we are concerned that the residents of Havlabar would share the fate of North Avenue in Yerevan, when the residents were forcibly kicked out to the streets and offered a pittance.” “But the issue of compensation is only part of the story,” Hambartsyumyan adds. “We (Georgian Armenians) are shocked by the fact that Havlabar would disappear in Tbilisi. In a few decades there will be not a single sign that the district was built and inhabited by the Armenians.”

      Ruben Ananikyan, another Havlabar resident expresses the utmost opposite opinion. Ahanikyan, the founder and the head of the non-governmental organization in Tbilisi “Inter ethnical tolerance” welcomes the construction of the new district and does not see in the urban project any manifestation against Armenians. He says that many houses in Havlabar lack elementary hygiene, like sewage or water supply. “No one is going to kick Armenians from the district. We were promised after the district is constructed people will get homes in the new buildings. During the construction people will be offered financial compensation to rent apartments somewhere in the city.”

      “All these talk of the ‘Georgian hatred towards Armenians’ is largely exaggerated. Havlabar is a problem for the city but only in terms of the old district. All countries worldwide have problems with the old dwellings of their cities. And Georgia is going to do what is done in all civilized countries- to destroy the old and construct the new.” Sergey Minasyan, the political analysts of the Caucasus Media Institute in Yerevan sees the merit of both opinions. “From the one side no one can deny that the construction in Havlabar is an urban project, followed by the reconstruction in other old and historical parts of Tbilisi, like Vake, Saburtalo or Sololaki. Havlabar could be called a façade of Tbilisi but since many houses there are uncared for it looks unattractive.”

      But the analyst says from the other side in the destruction of Havlabar there are some obvious political motives. He says in fact the elimination of Armenian historical presence has started in Georgia long ago, in 1920, when Armenian Soviet republic was created, then during Stalin’s rule which largely promoted the migration of Armenians from Georgia and then in 1990, during the rule of Georgia’s President Zviad Gamsakhurdia. Eduard Yedikiselov from Yerevan is anxiously waiting for the news from Tbilisi concerning Havlabar. In 2001 Edikiselov has founded in Yerevan the “Union of Tbilisi’s Armenians” to keep the culture and traditions of the Georgian Armenians. “Havlabar is a significant part of Armenian history in Tbilisi. The worse side of that story is that Armenians once compactly living in Havlabar will be dispersed. And no one could call the area ‘Armenian’ any more.”

      Source: http://armenianow.com/?action=printa...D=2494&lng=eng
      Մեր ժողովուրդն արանց հայրենասիրութեան այն է, ինչ որ մի մարմին' առանց հոգու:

      Նժդեհ


      Please visit me at my Heralding the Rise of Russia blog: http://theriseofrussia.blogspot.com/

      Comment


      • #43
        Re: Armenian Georgian Relations

        Georgia is turning to another turkic filth.


        The Vandalized Armenian cemetry of the town called Dusheti, in Georgia.


        The Armenian church of Akhalgori, is now 'Georgianized'...
        The Khatchkars (cross stones), specific of Armenian culture, are hammered, then covered by cement..


        The Vandalized Armenian cemetry of the town called Dusheti, in Georgia.


        Fresh inscriptions, imitating 'old georgian' style, are here to legalise the 'Georgianization'.. May 2003.


        Cultural Genocide is no shame for the Georgian state. Thus no hiding is necessary. Here, in the very heart of Tiflis, before the eyes of Western ambassies, a stone carver is fabricating historic proofs!

        You can see 100's of images of Georgia's turkish behaviour.
        http://www.djavakhk.com/galerie/disp...bum=44&stat=ok

        Comment


        • #44
          Re: Armenian Georgian Relations

          Georgians are filth.

          Comment


          • #45
            Re: Armenian Georgian Relations

            it depends some are good some are bad..

            Comment


            • #46
              Re: Armenian Georgian Relations

              " BAGRAMYAN " ARMENIAN TERRORIST RATS IN WAR WITH GEORGIANS: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmrCJEELupA
              Մեր ժողովուրդն արանց հայրենասիրութեան այն է, ինչ որ մի մարմին' առանց հոգու:

              Նժդեհ


              Please visit me at my Heralding the Rise of Russia blog: http://theriseofrussia.blogspot.com/

              Comment


              • #47
                Re: Armenian Georgian Relations

                These dirt bags are threatening Armenia now. Keep this in mind while also consider that Georgia along with an armada of Muslim countries voted against Armenians. I have lost my moderation towards Georgians and Georgia. F*ck em. Let them drown in their own xxxx.

                http://www.armtown.com/news/en/prm/20080506/39671/

                AMBASSADOR OF GEORGIA: “IF ARMENIA VOTES AGAINST IN UN…”

                Tomorrow Georgia presents to the UN Chief Assembly discussion an article about the status of the refugees and violently displaced people living in Georgia. In this regard, today the Ambassador of Georgia in Armenia Georgi Saganelidze had a meeting with the journalists and called on the Armenian authorities to vote for the article. According to him the demand to adopt such article has been created after getting concerned by the aggressive activities of Russia. Russian side should be conscious of the fact that it does not have any partners in its aggressive policy making activities. Georgian side carries out active foreign political activities in order colleague countries vote for the article, notified Saganelidze. He said that according to their sources Russia is going to take initiatives against the adoption of the article. We heard that Armenian authorities are going to vote against it also. And we are concerned with that. In this regard we held discussions with Armenian authorities but we have not got any clarified response yet, he said. If finally Armenia votes against the document, then, I guess, it will decrease the level of reliability among our nations. I ask Armenian authorities and call on them to be wise and not to harm itself and its colleagues, he said.
                If I swallow anything evil
                Put your finger down my throat

                Comment


                • #48
                  Re: Armenian Georgian Relations

                  why should we care about the Georgians, their country is falling apart slowly anyway let's just make the most of it. We'll take the southern part and Russians take the north.
                  Մեկ Ազգ, Մեկ Մշակույթ
                  ---
                  "Western Assimilation is the greatest threat to the Armenian nation since the Armenian Genocide."

                  Comment


                  • #49
                    Re: Armenian Georgian Relations

                    Originally posted by skhara View Post
                    These dirt bags are threatening Armenia now. Keep this in mind while also consider that Georgia along with an armada of Muslim countries voted against Armenians. I have lost my moderation towards Georgians and Georgia. F*ck em. Let them drown in their own xxxx.

                    http://www.armtown.com/news/en/prm/20080506/39671/

                    AMBASSADOR OF GEORGIA: “IF ARMENIA VOTES AGAINST IN UN…”

                    Tomorrow Georgia presents to the UN Chief Assembly discussion an article about the status of the refugees and violently displaced people living in Georgia. In this regard, today the Ambassador of Georgia in Armenia Georgi Saganelidze had a meeting with the journalists and called on the Armenian authorities to vote for the article. According to him the demand to adopt such article has been created after getting concerned by the aggressive activities of Russia. Russian side should be conscious of the fact that it does not have any partners in its aggressive policy making activities. Georgian side carries out active foreign political activities in order colleague countries vote for the article, notified Saganelidze. He said that according to their sources Russia is going to take initiatives against the adoption of the article. We heard that Armenian authorities are going to vote against it also. And we are concerned with that. In this regard we held discussions with Armenian authorities but we have not got any clarified response yet, he said. If finally Armenia votes against the document, then, I guess, it will decrease the level of reliability among our nations. I ask Armenian authorities and call on them to be wise and not to harm itself and its colleagues, he said.
                    I beginning to find them more repulsive than Azeris and Turks... If we only had a real nation, we would have taken the current unique opportunity and made a strategic move - a blitzkrieg to the Black Sea.
                    Մեր ժողովուրդն արանց հայրենասիրութեան այն է, ինչ որ մի մարմին' առանց հոգու:

                    Նժդեհ


                    Please visit me at my Heralding the Rise of Russia blog: http://theriseofrussia.blogspot.com/

                    Comment


                    • #50
                      Re: Armenian Georgian Relations

                      Originally posted by Armenian View Post
                      If we only had a real nation, we would have taken the current unique opportunity and made a strategic move - a blitzkrieg to the Black Sea.
                      I am not sure if you are joking. Even Russia does not do that in todays political environment.
                      If I swallow anything evil
                      Put your finger down my throat

                      Comment

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