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  • #11
    Originally posted by Jade View Post
    Ps: we watched it on BBC and the commentator would occasionally comment with the usual British sarcasm on the outfits or the quality of the songs etc, which made it all the more enjoyable!)
    The BBC commentator is Terry Wogan, an Irish DJ from BBC 2 Radio, famous now for 30 odd years, definitely the only reason the show is watched in the UK and he's completely unbiased as he is equally caustic in his comments about everyone and everything, but always with a smile !

    Comment


    • #12
      The majority of those who are upset with Serbia's victory seem to think that Ukraine deserved to win. I'm sorry, but if there are people who think that flamboyant and ridiculous piece of crap was worth voting for then there is no hope left for Eurovision. And the Armenian song was downright awful. I imagine its only support came from diaspora Armenians in various European countries.

      Why don't the Western European countries send more talented performers? Maybe it would get them out of their slump. For example, the United Kingdom could send Kate Bush. Though requesting for her to perform at that celebration of mediocrity known as Eurovision might be perceived as an insult nowadays.

      Comment


      • #13
        From The Times
        May 14, 2007
        Of course it’s all a joke – but do they know that in Sarajevo?
        Robbie Millen: Commentary

        Ukraine was robbed. Any fool who follows the Eurovision Song Contest must know that Verka Serduchka’s song Dancing Lasha Tumbai should have won.

        Silver tinfoil costumes, a meaningless catchy tune warbled in four languages, a transvestite front-erm-person — what could more encapsulate the glorious naffness of the competition? Yes, Ukraine was truly robbed by Balkan chicanery, and I’m as sick as a parrot.

        The Eurovision Song Contest is the gay world’s FA Cup. It is the only time that the BBC gives over three hours of primetime just so that the bars of Old Compton Street can fill up with gay boys and girls who want to shout derision and encouragement at big TV screens.

        What’s not to like about an event that is camper than a row of sequinned tents? On what other occasion could you thrill to Dmitry Koldun from Belarus, whose vivid spray-on tan left an orange fuzz on my TV set for more than an hour? And was there not fun to be had watching Kenan Dogulu who, despite the evidence of his own mirror, hip-wiggled and cavorted under the misapprehension that he was Turkey’s answer to Ricky Martin? (If he was the answer, the Turks misheard the question.)




        Did you not find yourself in awe of the curling tongs that created the iron-clad hairdos of the Serbian backing singers? Where else could you see such style as Germany’s Roger Cicero, who dressed like Frank Sinatra trapped in a snowstorm? And did you guess how many seconds before the Irish entry would go all Riverdancy? Let us honour Scooch too, who understood the spirit of the competition and sung appropriately off-key double-entendres about “blowing”. These moments — the time when taste runs for the hills — deserve to be televised.

        Of course, the event reveals some terrible regional backscratching. But who cares? We don’t want to win a contest in which Serbian hairdressers or the legions of continental David Hasselhoff fans have a vote. Eurovision isn’t about winning; it’s about the absurdity of our great continent set to tinny music and decked out in fabulous costumes.

        But one sobering thought. We in Britain regard it as a celebration of silliness, but does the rest of Europe? Nations unblessed with Woganian irony might regard Eurovision as a serious pop-cultural highlight. I have this terrible feeling that this year’s winner, Marija Šerifovic, is going to be the biggest thing in Sarajevo since Gavrilo Princip let loose his bullet on Archduke Franz Ferdinand.

        Perhaps that’s a good thing. The best jokes are the ones that not everyone is in on.

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        • #14
          Great article.

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          • #15
            Indeed it is!
            By the way Steph thanks so much for the info! I've been dying to find out who the BBC guy was Now I'll go and google him
            "In the practice of tolerance, one's enemy is the best teacher." Dalai Lama

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            • #16
              ????

              Turkey sent Armenia a political message via Eurovision?
              14.05.2007 19:19 GMT+04:00

              /PanARMENIAN.Net/ It attracted the interest of many that Turkey only gave the maximum 12 points to Armenian singer Hayko’s “Anytime You Need.” Musical tastes aside, most people believe this is a political message.

              “We are neighbors. We need to be friends. It goes to show how prominent a role music, friendship, and art play,” said Sezen Cumhur Onal, a celebrated music critic in Turkey. He believes the votes cast from Turkey for the Armenian contestant to be political and said there could not have been a better Mothers’ Day present.

              On the other hand, Alin Tasciyan an Armenian-Turkish journalist and acclaimed film critic believes that political messages given through the Eurovision song contest fall short, as the contest itself has no political significance. She does not believe it is possible for Armenia to receive so many votes from only the Armenian community in Turkey. “I do not believe it is a high probability Because the number of Armenian living in Turkey is not that high,” she said, Turkish daily News reports.

              Hayko with his song “Anytime You Need” took the 8th place in Eurovision 2007. He got 138 points. The highest 12 points he got from Turkey and Georgia.

              Comment


              • #17
                Originally posted by steph View Post
                The BBC commentator is Terry Wogan, an Irish DJ from BBC 2 Radio, famous now for 30 odd years, definitely the only reason the show is watched in the UK and he's completely unbiased as he is equally caustic in his comments about everyone and everything, but always with a smile !
                Hi Steph-

                We had a whole thread about the Eurovision contest last year and about how much a joke it is. The Northern/Western Europeans seem to regard it as a farce-high on the unintentional comedy meter- (much like some Americans regard "American Idol"), which I also feel it is. If I lived in the UK, I'd probably have my friends over, have a few brews, and watch in absolute amusement. I'm jeaous of you guys.
                General Antranik (1865-1927): “I am not a nationalist. I recognize only one nation, the nation of the oppressed.”

                Comment


                • #18
                  Originally posted by steph View Post
                  Turkey sent Armenia a political message via Eurovision?
                  14.05.2007 19:19 GMT+04:00

                  /PanARMENIAN.Net/ It attracted the interest of many that Turkey only gave the maximum 12 points to Armenian singer Hayko’s “Anytime You Need.” Musical tastes aside, most people believe this is a political message.

                  “We are neighbors. We need to be friends. It goes to show how prominent a role music, friendship, and art play,” said Sezen Cumhur Onal, a celebrated music critic in Turkey. He believes the votes cast from Turkey for the Armenian contestant to be political and said there could not have been a better Mothers’ Day present.

                  On the other hand, Alin Tasciyan an Armenian-Turkish journalist and acclaimed film critic believes that political messages given through the Eurovision song contest fall short, as the contest itself has no political significance. She does not believe it is possible for Armenia to receive so many votes from only the Armenian community in Turkey. “I do not believe it is a high probability Because the number of Armenian living in Turkey is not that high,” she said, Turkish daily News reports.

                  Hayko with his song “Anytime You Need” took the 8th place in Eurovision 2007. He got 138 points. The highest 12 points he got from Turkey and Georgia.
                  I hardly know what to write. More unintentional comedy perhaps?
                  General Antranik (1865-1927): “I am not a nationalist. I recognize only one nation, the nation of the oppressed.”

                  Comment


                  • #19
                    Originally posted by Joseph View Post
                    I hardly know what to write. More unintentional comedy perhaps?
                    The beauty of it all is that it does give us something to smile about.in an otherwise sh*tty world.

                    Comment


                    • #20
                      Originally posted by steph View Post
                      The beauty of it all is that it does give us something to smile about.in an otherwise sh*tty world.
                      Do you guys ever accidentally spit beer out of your nose from hysterics when you see the performances?

                      I imagine many unintentional Borats performing.
                      General Antranik (1865-1927): “I am not a nationalist. I recognize only one nation, the nation of the oppressed.”

                      Comment

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