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The 100th Anniversary - and Events to Mark it

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  • Re: The 100th Anniversary - and Events to Mark it

    ARMENIAN AUTHORS COMING TO UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN-DEARBORN

    Dearborn Press and Guide, MI
    Oct 6 2015

    Published: Tuesday, October 06, 2015

    By Teresa Duhl
    Special to the Press & Guide

    In Turkey, a 100-year-old Armenian woman, named Asiya, still resides
    in her family's hometown of Chunkush. Not far away, a new school was
    erected in 2014. The connection between this new school and Asiya
    brings the 100th anniversary of the Armenian Genocide into sharp
    focus. New York Times bestselling author Chris Bohjalian met Asiya
    when he visited Turkey in 2013. In two Washington Post op-ed pieces,
    he wrote about Asiya's story and the anger he felt when he saw the
    school for the first time.

    In 1915, Turkish and Kurdish killing squads rounded up the 10,000
    Armenians living in Chunkush. They took them to the very spot where
    the new school now stands, at the edge of a ravine about two hours
    from Chunkush. At the pit of the ravine is the Dudan Crevasse.

    Asiya's mother was among the Armenians taken. She stood at the edge of
    the ravine holding her infant daughter. What did she see? Her neighbors
    and family pushed or stabbed into the crevasse? Did she look around at
    the frightened faces next to her? Perhaps she closed her eyes. What
    sounds did she hear? Screams, shouting, gunshots, the thud of bodies
    thrown onto other bodies? Was Asiya crying in her arms? What did she
    feel? Fear, rage? Would it be possible to feel peace?

    One thing is certain, at the edge of the ravine, she waited for the
    force, whether bullet, bayonet, or boot, that would thrust her into
    the Dudan Crevasse below. She held her daughter and waited. She did
    this in the same space that, 100 years later, would be the home of
    a new, gleaming elementary school.

    But death did not come. One of the Kurds found her attractive, so he
    pulled her from the line. He married her and raised Asiya as his own
    daughter. Asiya and her mother were saved from death, but they also
    had to hide their Armenian heritage for the remainder of their days.

    Even in 2013, when Bohjalian first met Asiya, she would not speak of
    her Armenian heritage with him, he said.

    Bohjalian suggests the new school was built to cover up the mass
    grave and the larger history of Turkey's orchestrated slaughter of
    1.5 million Armenians.

    "I do not know the thinking behind the placement of the Yenikoy
    elementary school. But I have my suspicions. I would not be surprised
    if next year when I visit, the crevasse has been filled in: the
    evidence of a crime of seismic magnitude forever buried," he wrote
    in 2014.

    Whether the school has been erected out of genuine need or as a
    means of covering up the evil that took place at the Dudan Ravine,
    its existence is ironic. A school now marks the unmarked mass grave
    of 10,000 Armenians. An institution of knowledge serves as the symbol
    of a space where heinous acts of ignorance were perpetrated.

    "The irony, however, is this: It will no longer take complex directions
    or GPS coordinates to find the 10,000 dead at Dudan. All you will
    need to tell someone is to visit the Yenikoy elementary school. Go
    stand by the playground. The dead are right there," wrote Bohjalian.

    Though, as of yet, he has not made Asiya's story into a novel,
    Bohjalian has written 18 books, including one that focuses on the
    Armenian Genocide, "The Sandcastle Girls." He and eight other Armenian
    authors will present at the Book and Author Festival at the University
    of Michigan-Dearborn on Saturday.

    The festival is one of several events organized this year by
    the Armenian Genocide Centennial Committee of Greater Detroit to
    commemorate the 100th anniversary of the start of the Armenian
    Genocide. For Dearborn, the festival is at least the third
    commemorative event this year. In April, the committee hosted a
    remembrance at Edsel Ford High School featuring actor and author Eric
    Bogosian and journalist Robert Fisk. In May, the Catholicos Aram I,
    one of two pontiffs who rules the Armenian Apostolic Church, visited
    St. Sarkis.

    The Book and Author Festival is the result of a partnership between
    the committee and the university's Armenian Research Center. According
    to the university's website, It is the only Armenian research facility
    associated with an American university.

    The festival will take place from 9:30 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. at the
    university's Kochoff Hall. The morning session, which runs until 12:30
    p.m., will feature Michelle Andonian, Christopher Atamian, Robert
    George Koolakian, Marian Mesrobian MacCurdy, and Scout Tufankjian. The
    afternoon session begins at 1:30 p.m. and features Bohjalian, Matthew
    Karanian, Nancy Kricorian and Aline Ohanesian. Each session will
    include the authors' presentations, as well as a question and answer
    period and opportunity for book signings. Admission to the festival
    is free, but lunch must be ordered and purchased in advance. For more
    information on the festival, contact Gerald Ottenbreit at 313-593-5181.

    That same evening, the authors will gather for the Authors' Banquet
    at Pine Lake Country Club in West Bloomfield. Tickets for this
    event are limited and cost $60 per person. For information on the
    banquet, contact Gloria Korkoian at 313-730-6698 or Tamar Kadian
    at 248-723-5520. Fliers for both events are posted at the Armenian
    Genocide Centennial Committee of Greater Detroit Facebook page.

    http://www.pressandguide.com/article...3724202925.txt
    Hayastan or Bust.

    Comment


    • Re: The 100th Anniversary - and Events to Mark it

      TURKS RELEASE ANOTHER BOOK DENYING THE ARMENIAN GENOCIDE

      Posted By: adminPosted date: October 12, 2015in: News & Articles

      Turkey is editing history by publishing "historical" books that don't
      contain information about the genocide.

      Another book has been released within the scope of Turkey's state
      policy of denial of the Armenian Genocide with the title "The 100th
      Year of the Armenian Question: Claims, Lies and Truths".

      As reports ife.org.tr, the book contains 15 articles reflecting on
      the Armenian Question and Turkish-Armenian relations from the social,
      political and historical perspectives, writes ermenihaber.am.

      The book is obviously devoted to the provisions of the policy of
      denial.

      It is mentioned that the need for writing such a book emerged because
      "the Armenian Question is still current, as in the past, though 100
      years have already passed."

      The book was compiled by 15 authors

      http://www.ragmamoul.net/news-in-eng...nian-genocide/
      Hayastan or Bust.

      Comment


      • Re: The 100th Anniversary - and Events to Mark it

        Euractiv , EU
        Oct 16 2015

        Human Rights Court: Denial of Armenian genocide is not a crime


        The European Court of Human Rights ruled on Thursday (15 October) that
        a Turkish politician should not have been prosecuted for denying that
        the mass killing of Armenians by Ottoman Turkey in 1915 was a
        genocide.

        Switzerland had violated the Turkish politician's right to freedom of
        speech by convicting him for denying that the killing of Armenians by
        Ottoman Turks in 1915 amounted to genocide, the Court ruled.

        In a landmark free speech ruling, the ECHR judges ruled by 10 votes to
        seven that Dogu Perincek, chairman of Turkey's Patriotic Party, should
        never have been convicted of racial discrimination by a Swiss court
        for saying that the "Armenian genocide is a great international lie".

        Perincek was convicted and fined in 2007 after a series of press
        conferences on the topic, which the ECHR ruled was an infringement on
        his right to free speech.

        In its judgement, the court said Perincek's statements related to an
        issue of "public interest and did not amount to a call for hatred or
        intolerance ... and could not be regarded as affecting the dignity of
        the members of the Armenian community to the point of requiring a
        criminal law response".

        The court made a clear distinction with Holocaust denial, whose
        specific history meant it could always be "seen as a form of
        incitement to racial hatred" in certain countries.

        Its judges have earlier noted that the historical facts of the
        Holocaust, "such as the existence of gas chambers" were "considered
        clearly established by an international jurisdiction".

        Sensitive debate

        The events of 1915 are a highly sensitive issue both in Turkey and
        among Armenians in Armenia and in the diaspora. Muslim Turkey accepts
        that Christian Armenians were killed by Ottoman forces during World
        War One, but denies there was any systematic attack on civilians
        amounting to genocide.

        Perincek tweeted his reaction, presenting the case as part of a
        national struggle reaching back into the early years of the 20th
        century when the modern Turkish state emerged.

        "This is not a historical debate or legal dispute. This is a defence
        of the country. A fight for independence!" he said.

        The Strasbourg-based court said in a statement it had ruled that it
        was not necessary to criminally convict Perincek to protect the rights
        of the Armenian community.

        "The Swiss courts appeared to have censured Mr Perincek simply for
        voicing an opinion that diverged from the established ones in
        Switzerland, and the interference with his right to freedom of
        expression had taken the serious form of a criminal conviction," the
        court said.

        Perincek had been ordered to pay a number of fines, suspended for two
        years, and 1,000 Swiss francs in compensation to the
        Switzerland-Armenia Association for non-pecuniary damage.

        Decision left to international criminal courts

        The ECHR said it did not have the authority to rule on whether the
        Armenian killings were a genocide or not, which was a job for
        international criminal courts.

        It also accepted that "the dignity of the victims and the dignity and
        identity of modern-day Armenians were protected by Article 8" of the
        European Convention on Human Rights.

        But it ruled that in the specific circumstances of the case, a
        democratic society should not have gone as far as prosecuting Perincek
        over his comments.

        "The context in which they were made had not been marked by heightened
        tensions or special historical overtones in Switzerland," the ruling
        said.

        "The Swiss courts appeared to have censured Mr Perincek simply for
        voicing an opinion that diverged from the established ones in
        Switzerland," it added.

        The ECHR's Grand Chamber ruling is final and binding on all Council of
        Europe members.

        Perincek's lawyer Laurent Pech has earlier said that his client
        "neither contested nor defended the massacres," but merely denied that
        the Ottoman authorities of the time had a genocidal intention.

        Armenia: Judgement is 'very good result'

        Even though the ECHR ruling went in Perincek's favour, it was welcomed
        by Armenia's government, which said that although the Turkish
        politician was exonerated, the court had recognised Armenians right to
        protection against hate speech.

        "It means that states in Europe can punish Armenian genocide denial if
        it is calculated to incite violence or racial disharmony," Armenia's
        prosecutor general Gevorg Kostanyan said in a statement.

        "The judgement is a very good result for Armenia and for Armenians," he added.

        That interpretation was backed by Geoffrey Robertson, the high-profile
        British lawyer representing Armenia, who said the ruling clearly
        stated Armenians had "a right to respect for their history".

        The Swiss authorities were indeed wrong to prosecute Perincek,
        Robertson added, but only because he was "a worthless provocateur".


        Background

        The European Parliament backed a motion earlier this year that calls
        the massacre a century ago of up to 1.5 million Armenians by Ottoman
        Turkish forces a "genocide".

        MEPs stressed the need for Turkey to recognise the Armenian genocide,
        so as to pave way for `genuine reconciliation'.

        Muslim Turkey agrees that Christian Armenians were killed in clashes
        with Ottoman forces that began on 15 April, 1915, when large numbers
        of Armenians lived in the empire ruled by Istanbul, but denies that
        this amounted to genocide.

        Some European and South American countries use the term to describe
        the killings, but the United States and some others, keen to maintain
        good relations with an important ally, avoid doing so. Germany has
        long resisted using the term `genocide' but the government recently
        changed its mind.


        Turkey is a candidate country to join the 28-nation EU but accession
        talks have dragged on for years with little progress.


        http://www.euractiv.com/sections/jus...t-crime-318582
        Hayastan or Bust.

        Comment


        • Re: The 100th Anniversary - and Events to Mark it

          xxxx the eu
          EuroTopics, EU
          Oct 18 2015

          Holocaust not more important than Armenian genocide


          The European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) has ruled that denying the
          Armenian genocide is not an incitement to racial hatred and should
          therefore not be punishable by law. With their decision the judges are
          making awkward comparisons, the centre-left daily Tages-Anzeiger
          complains: "The problem is not so much that a person who denies the
          Armenian genocide will now go unpunished. Far more worrying is that
          the ECHR is treating genocides differently. Those who deny the
          Holocaust are automatically inciting racial hatred, but those who deny
          the Armenian genocide don't necessarily do so with the intention of
          inciting hatred. This distinction is incomprehensible. Whether the
          Armenians and Turks will ever reconcile is questionable. The ECHR's
          ruling has weakened the position of the minority and therefore
          achieved nothing in terms of mediating between the two peoples."


          http://www.eurotopics.net/en/home/pr...enian-genocide
          Hayastan or Bust.

          Comment


          • Re: The 100th Anniversary - and Events to Mark it

            Originally posted by Haykakan View Post
            xxxx the eu
            EuroTopics, EU
            Oct 18 2015

            Holocaust not more important than Armenian genocide


            The European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) has ruled that denying the
            Armenian genocide is not an incitement to racial hatred and should
            therefore not be punishable by law. With their decision the judges are
            making awkward comparisons, the centre-left daily Tages-Anzeiger
            complains: "The problem is not so much that a person who denies the
            Armenian genocide will now go unpunished. Far more worrying is that
            the ECHR is treating genocides differently. Those who deny the
            Holocaust are automatically inciting racial hatred, but those who deny
            the Armenian genocide don't necessarily do so with the intention of
            inciting hatred. This distinction is incomprehensible. Whether the
            Armenians and Turks will ever reconcile is questionable. The ECHR's
            ruling has weakened the position of the minority and therefore
            achieved nothing in terms of mediating between the two peoples."


            http://www.eurotopics.net/en/home/pr...enian-genocide

            We should hire an international agent provocateur and go through the same process as that Turkish bastard did and test the whole morality of that decision.

            .
            Politics is not about the pursuit of morality nor what's right or wrong
            Its about self interest at personal and national level often at odds with the above.
            Great politicians pursue the National interest and small politicians personal interests

            Comment


            • Re: The 100th Anniversary - and Events to Mark it

              Originally posted by londontsi View Post
              We should hire an international agent provocateur and go through the same process as that Turkish bastard did and test the whole morality of that decision.

              .
              Your own signature seems to address this issue in the sense that it has become a political issue and not a moral one. I think this decision speaks volumes about how we can expect to be received by the West as you can clearly see how corrupt that system really is. The point of this ruling is quite clear and that point is that only jjeewwss can be the victims of genocide and everyone else simply does not matter. The suffering of Hebrews is real suffering and everyone else is just making stuff up.... Recently we have seen some very clear indications from the west regarding our rejection by it. The absence of western presidents on April 24 in Armenia(except France) and now this ruling clearly show that we will not be welcomed with open arms into Europe. The hypocrisy here is quite outrageous but who is even talking about it?
              Hayastan or Bust.

              Comment


              • Re: The 100th Anniversary - and Events to Mark it

                I am really surprised that no one seems to care about this ruling.
                Hayastan or Bust.

                Comment


                • Re: The 100th Anniversary - and Events to Mark it

                  Originally posted by Haykakan View Post
                  I am really surprised that no one seems to care about this ruling.
                  They (Europe) sold us down the road so they could share in the spoils of the 1915 genocide committed against us. What you saw in the ruling was yet another confirmation of the selling out of the Armenian people's. It (the ruling & the court) was nothing more than a dog & pony show.
                  After a 100 years of the 2nd most studied genocide , this self serving ?court? couldn't figure out it was a genocide ???
                  Nothing but a dog & pony show.

                  Consider ... USA/Europe , are engaged in the criminal act of destroying Syria. Do you think this sickening excuse for a court is not also part and parcel a criminal institution designed to ligitemize the criminal behavior of Europe/USA ?
                  Fraudulence and criminality go hand in hand.
                  HARK

                  Comment


                  • Re: The 100th Anniversary - and Events to Mark it

                    "MY HOME, MY ARMENIA"

                    The Sunday Times (London), UK
                    October 25, 2015 Sunday

                    This 105-year-old man is one of the last survivors of the Armenian
                    genocide. The photographer Diana Markosianpresented him and other
                    survivors with images of the land they were forced to leave a century
                    ago and have not set foot in since

                    Movses Haneshyan, 105, approaches a landscape produced by Diana
                    Markosian. He pauses, looks at the image, and begins to sing:
                    "My home... my Armenia."

                    It's the first time Movses has seen an image of his home village,
                    Kebussieh, in Turkey, in a century. He fled in 1915 at the age of
                    five. He now lives across the border in the Republic of Armenia.

                    Markosian says that even though her subjects were very young at the
                    time of the genocide, they have powerful memories of the traumatic
                    events These beautifully composed pictures are a stark reminder of one
                    of the most controversial and disputed episodes of the last century:
                    the armenian genocide, which began 100 years ago. the tragic story of
                    the armenians is etched deeply on the faces of the people photographed
                    here. they can neither forgive, nor forget.

                    it is widely accepted that between 800,000 and 1.5m ottoman armenians
                    were killed as the ottoman empire crumbled - though the figure has
                    been fiercely disputed by successive turkish governments, who have
                    always denied that a genocide took place.

                    the campaign against the armenians started in the spring of 1915
                    and it quickly turned into mass murder. While turkey accepts that
                    deportations of armenians took place - they were suspected of colluding
                    with russia as the empire collapsed - it insists that killing happened
                    on both sides. they say there was no premeditation in the deaths,
                    no systematic attempt to destroy a people. it remains illegal in
                    turkey for journalists to call it a "genocide".

                    the european parliament recognises that a genocide took place, but
                    the Un won't go so far, calling it an "atrocity crime". neither the
                    british nor american governments describe it as "genocide".

                    For this project, the armenian-american photographer diana markosian
                    travelled first to the republic of armenia to meet some of the
                    remaining survivors. since the massacres began in 1915, she knew she
                    would find only a handful of people who witnessed the horrors.

                    tracking them down was a Herculean task, she says.

                    "the armenian government was unable to provide any information; it said
                    this was confidential. so i looked for armenian voter registrations
                    online to see who was born before 1915. i had a few dozen names and
                    the villages in armenia where they lived."

                    once she found them, she asked about their lives in their former
                    homeland - part of present-day turkey - from which they were expelled.

                    then she travelled into turkey to photograph the landmarks and villages
                    they described. born in moscow, but educated in the Us, markosian spoke
                    to the survivors in russian. she interviewed them at length about their
                    experiences and they were able to recall the events in great detail.

                    "When i met movses, mariam and yepraksia, they guided me back to their
                    past. i told them i was travelling to their native lands, and they
                    asked me to help fulfil their wishes. movses gave me a hand-drawn
                    map of his village in turkey and asked me to find his church and
                    leave his image there. He hadn't seen his home in a century. When i
                    returned to his village, not too far from syria, i found everything
                    movses had described to me: the sheep, the fruit he remembered eating,
                    the sea. i even found his church, which is now in ruins."

                    movses fled his birthplace of kebussieh in 1915, aged five. He
                    remembers when ottoman soldiers entered his village. "i was with my
                    father, holding his hand. Half the road was covered with dead people."

                    Like movses, markosian's other subjects had personal requests to make.

                    "mariam asked me to bring back turkish soil, so she could be buried
                    with it. and yepraksia wanted help finding her older brother, from
                    whom she was separated after the genocide. i never found him, but
                    i did come back with a story for movses and a container of dirt for
                    mariam. When she opened it, she thanked me and said, 'you've brought
                    the smell of my village to me.'" once she had taken pictures of their
                    villages, markosian made large prints of them, brought them back to
                    armenia and photographed her subjects with them.

                    "they are still angry," markosian says.

                    "they witnessed deportation and death and now they face continued
                    denial of the genocide. i am not sure if they will ever forgive the
                    turks." n these pages Yepraksia gevorgyan, who is believed to be 110 -
                    she fled the massacres in 1915 with her family and no ID documents -
                    is pictured in present-day armenia, with a picture of the ruins of
                    the medieval armenian city of ani, which lies in modern turkey's Kars
                    province. her father was killed as they fled, and her mother died
                    shortly after they reached their destination. "I remember the river,"
                    she says. "I saw the turks kill the armenians, throwing their bodies in
                    the water" above Movses Haneshyan, 105, touches a picture of Kebussieh,
                    his former home in Turkey below Movses at home in armenia.

                    "Half the road was covered with dead people," he recalls above Mariam
                    Sahakyan, 101, was born in the village of Sason, in Turkey, in 1914.

                    when the genocide began the following year, the infant Mariam
                    and her family were sheltered by a local Kurdish family, before
                    they eventually fled to Syria in 1918. She later moved to armenia,
                    where she is pictured here below Mariam's family present her with
                    Markosian's picture of Sason. She had also asked the photographer:
                    "bring back soil for me to be buried in" Mariam, who now lives in
                    Armenia with her family, sits in front of the image of Sason
                    Hayastan or Bust.

                    Comment


                    • Re: The 100th Anniversary - and Events to Mark it

                      UK - Prince Charles greets Armenian President Serzh Sarkisian and
                      Catholicos Garegin II during an ecumenical service at Westminster
                      Abbey, London, 28Oct2015.

                      The service was part of worldwide events marking the 100th anniversary
                      of the genocide, which began on April 24, 1915 with mass arrests of
                      Armenian political leaders and intellectuals in Constantinople. Up to
                      1.5 million Armenian subjects of the Ottoman Empire were murdered or
                      starved to death in the following years.

                      The most important events marking the genocide centennial in and
                      outside Armenia took place on April 24, 2015. The Turkish government,
                      which strongly denies that the 1915 massacres constituted genocide,
                      tried to deflect the resulting international spotlight by holding its
                      annual commemoration of a major World War One-era battle on the same
                      day.

                      Ankara had traditionally celebrated the Turkish victory in the
                      1915-1916 Battle of Gallipoli on April 25. The Armenian government
                      condemned it for moving up this year's Gallipoli ceremony by one day.

                      Charles was among a host of mostly Muslim foreign leaders who took
                      part in the ceremony at Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's
                      invitation. His participation upset many in Armenia and its worldwide
                      Diaspora.

                      One of the likely reasons why Queen Elizabeth's heir apparent took
                      part in the Westminster Abbey service is his close rapport with Armen
                      Sarkissian, the Armenian ambassador to the United Kingdom who has
                      lived in London since the early 1990s. Sarkissian was instrumental in
                      Charles' 2013 visit to Armenia.

                      Statements by the press offices of President Sarkisian and Westminster
                      Abbey did not list any senior British government officials among those
                      who attended the service. Their apparent absence reflected the current
                      and previous British governments' refusal to recognize the Armenian
                      genocide.
                      Hayastan or Bust.

                      Comment

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