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Armenian cognates w/other languages

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  • Armenian cognates w/other languages

    jgk3 inspired me to start this thread, though i'm sure there's been one like it before.

    Originally posted by jgk3 View Post
    Obvious similarities in non-loan words anyone?

    Queen - Gyn
    Eat - Outel
    Cat - Gadou
    Cow - Gov
    Odor - Hod
    Door - Tur
    Foot - Votk
    Listen - Lesel
    Spanish

    *Lava-Leva
    *Naranja-Narinch
    *Gato-Gadu
    *Cinco-Hink (?)
    *Diez-Das
    *Ar,Er,Ir verbs- Al, El, Il verbs

    German

    Arsch/Esel(Ass/Donkey) -Esh/ Eshel esheg
    Tür-Tur
    Let's follow the cops back home and rob their houses.

  • #2
    Re: Armenian cognates w/other languages

    Semetic (Arabic/Hebrew)

    Shapat - shabat (sabbath)
    «Արթուն մնացէ'ք եւ աղօթք արէ'ք, որպէսզի փորձութեան մէջ չընկնէք:»

    Մատթէոս 26:41

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Armenian cognates w/other languages

      Originally posted by Post_Blue View Post
      *Naranja-Narinch
      That would be a loan word from Arabic which affected several languages of Asia and Europe, being so pervasive in English as to become the word for the colour Orange. The same applies to the root word for sugar and if I'm not mistaken, coffee.
      I was taught how to think.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Armenian cognates w/other languages

        Btw, if we keep this thread going long enough, we can turn it into an organized archive for all non-loan words in Armenian that share cognates in other languages (even though this has already been done by Armenian linguists, it would be fun to see what we can come up with).
        I was taught how to think.

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        • #5
          Re: Armenian cognates w/other languages

          I didn't really get the odor & hod connection.... like whats the common root? maybe if it was hodor and then the "h' was dropped, idk... i'm just not seeing it. Also the same for foot & votk and eat & oudel/tel.
          Let's follow the cops back home and rob their houses.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Armenian cognates w/other languages

            Originally posted by Post_Blue View Post
            I didn't really get the odor & hod connection.... like whats the common root? maybe if it was hodor and then the "h' was dropped, idk... i'm just not seeing it. Also the same for foot & votk and eat & oudel/tel.
            Well, if you take off the classical plural marker (ք - actually makes the word 'feet' and not foot) and transliterate «ոտ» classically, "vot" is really not that far off from 'foot'.
            «Արթուն մնացէ'ք եւ աղօթք արէ'ք, որպէսզի փորձութեան մէջ չընկնէք:»

            Մատթէոս 26:41

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            • #7
              Re: Armenian cognates w/other languages

              oh, thanks...
              Let's follow the cops back home and rob their houses.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Armenian cognates w/other languages

                Roots for words across languages don't have to look and sound exactly the same, the words go through a long series of phonological shifts as they are used century after century. For example, the gh sound in yegeghetsi was a shift, an Armenian phonological response to an l sound. I'm not entirely certain on what environment for l prompted a shift to "gh" at one time in the Armenian language's history, but the point is, it comes from the same root as Eglise in french and Iglesia in Spanish. There was apparently a process of fortition that occured on the s also for this word, which in Armenian produced the affricate sound ts at the end of the word.

                Still, once you are aware of these phonological (pronunciation) shifts, it is very easy to reconstruct certain Armenian words so that it is plain clear that they have cognates in other languages.

                Now, you be the judge, if a shift from l to gh is hard for many people to comprehend, perhaps having an h in the Armenian word Hod is not so odd when compared to odor in English, which is actually a word derived from French Odeur. I'm not exactly certain whether the Indo-European root had an h in the beginning or not, or something else, but the common characteristics of hod vs od-or, plus the fact that they share a very similar reference to smell, that neither have any indication of being loaned from Armenian to English or vice versa, is strong evidence that they both evolved from the same initial root.

                Ditto for Utel vs Eat. In Utel's case, which is even simpler than hod, the root of the verb is Ut. The only difference it has to its cognate in English is the backing of the initial vowel, an adjacent vowel pronunciation shift. The U and I sounds are high vowels, as in the tongue is relatively much closer to the palate or roof of the mouth when compared to other vowels, such as A, O or E. The only difference between U and I is that the tongue is front (closer to the front teeth) for I and back (away from the front teeth) for U. Shifts like these, even within the same language, are EXTREMELY common as languages evolve with new trends in pronunciation. Even if you compare Western to Eastern Armenian, you will find evidence for such shifts between the two.
                I was taught how to think.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Armenian cognates w/other languages

                  English
                  Bearest- Berek/Perek

                  Latin
                  Navalis-Nav

                  Thai
                  Dek'Chai-Degha (stretch?)

                  ----------------------------------------------------
                  Another stretch... do you think the name of a type of monkey called"Gibbon" has anything to do with "Gabik/Gabig?"

                  "Gib" becomes "Gab," an "ik/ig" is added on from bezdig/bezdik b/c gibbons are of the "lesser" apes, therefore "smaller" apes, and "ik/ig" is used to indicate small size in many words

                  Originally posted by jgk3 View Post
                  That would be a loan word from Arabic which affected several languages of Asia and Europe, being so pervasive in English as to become the word for the colour Orange.
                  Arabic took it from Sanskrit's "nāraṅga"
                  Last edited by ara87; 11-11-2008, 04:09 PM.
                  Due to budget cuts the light at the end of the tunnel has been turned off.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Armenian cognates w/other languages

                    Turkish

                    Chakootch = Moorj

                    Chakootch is in Turkish btw not Armenian.

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